Anya Kamenetz

NPR

Anya Kamenetz appears in the following:

A Key Researcher Says 'Grit' Isn't Ready For High-Stakes Measures

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

If you've followed education in the news or at the book store in the past couple of years, chances are you've heard of "grit." It's often defined as the ability to persevere when times get tough, or to delay gratification in pursuit of a goal.

Alongside growth mindset ...

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A #BlackLivesMatter Leader At Teach For America

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

When 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed by a police officer in Ferguson, Mo., last summer, Brittany Packnett felt that she had no choice but to get involved.

"I'm a North County kid," she said, referring to the region of St. Louis that includes Ferguson. "These are my ...

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Counting Poor Students Is Getting Harder

Sunday, May 10, 2015

Researchers, grant-makers and policymakers have long relied on enrollment numbers for the federally subsidized Free and Reduced-Price Lunch program. They use those numbers as a handy proxy for measuring how many students are struggling economically. The paperwork that families submit to show their income becomes the basis of billions in ...

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AltSchool Promises To Reimagine Education For the 2030s

Thursday, May 07, 2015

One of the hottest new startups in the Bay Area is a school. The AltSchool was founded by a former Google engineer and he's raised $100 million to build these for-profit microschools.

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A For-Profit School Startup Where Kids Are Beta Testers

Monday, May 04, 2015

At first glance, the warehouse in San Francisco's SOMA neighborhood could be the headquarters of any well-funded startup: exposed concrete, natural light, lots of Macbooks. Then you spot the 12- and 13-year-olds doing yoga in a glass-walled conference room.

It's a tech company, but it's also a private, for-profit middle ...

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Several Florida School Districts Cut (Way) Back On Tests

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Did you hear that?

It's the sound of hundreds of thousands of public school students in Florida breathing sighs of relief.

The state's largest school district, Miami-Dade County, just cut the number of district-created, end-of-course exams it will require from roughly 300 to 10. And even those 10 will be ...

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Delinquent. Dropout. At-Risk. When Words Become Labels

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Much of our recent reporting, especially from New Orleans, has focused on young people who are neither in school nor working. There are an estimated 5 1/2 million of them, ages 16 to 24, in the United States.

But what do we call them? The nomenclature has fluctuated widely ...

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The Largest For-Profit College Shutdown In History

Monday, April 27, 2015

The long-running story of the for-profit Corinthian Colleges has entered what looks like a final phase. As our colleagues at SCPR wrote:

"Corinthian Colleges will shut down all of its remaining 28 ground campuses, displacing about 16,000 students, less than two weeks after the U.S. Department of Education ...

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What If Students Could Fire Their Professors?

Sunday, April 26, 2015

"Welcome to Iowa State University. May I take your paper, please?"

A bill circulating in the Iowa state Senate would rate professors' performance based on student evaluations. Just student evaluations.

Low-rated professors would be automatically fired — no tenure, no appeals.

The bill's author, state Sen. Mark Chelgren, a Republican, ...

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To Get More Students Through College, Give Them Fewer Choices

Thursday, April 23, 2015

How many different flavors of jam do you need to be happy?

In 2000, a famous experiment showed that when people were presented with a supermarket sampler of 24 exotic fruit flavors, they were more attracted to the display. But, when the sample included only six flavors, they were ...

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Anti-Test 'Opt-Out' Movement Makes A Wave In New York State

Monday, April 20, 2015

Activists say that about 175,000 students refused to take federally mandated tests last week.

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Falling Through The Cracks: Young Lives Adrift In New Orleans

Saturday, April 18, 2015

On weekend afternoons, Craig Adams Jr. plays for tourists on the streets of the French Quarter.

He gigs with different bands, bringing whatever's needed: trumpet, trombone, saxophone — he plays six or seven instruments in all. There's a white plastic bucket on the sidewalk so people can drop in cash ...

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In New Orleans, A Second-Chance School Tries Again

Friday, April 17, 2015

Crescent Leadership Academy has a checkered reputation, but a new principal is trying to do right by some of the toughest — and most troubled — kids in the city.

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New Research Shows Free Online Courses Didn't Grow As Expected

Saturday, April 11, 2015

Remember the MOOC?

Just a few years ago, the Massive Open Online Course was expected to reinvent higher education. Millions of people were signing up to watch Web-based, video lectures from the world's great universities. Some were completing real assignments, earning certificates and forming virtual study groups — all for ...

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The Atlanta Cheating Verdict: Some Context

Wednesday, April 01, 2015

Today an Atlanta jury found eleven educators guilty of racketeering in a case that implicated dozens of schools and hundreds of educators. Their scheme: inflate scores on high-stakes standardized tests.

The case has drawn national attention, exposing widespread abuse and unethical behavior in the school district. Those convicted face ...

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Activists Stop Paying Their Student Loans

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Latonya Suggs says she borrowed thousands of dollars in student loans to attend the for-profit Corinthian Colleges but has nothing to show for it. Most employers don't recognize her criminal justice degree.

"I am completely lost and in debt," Suggs says. And now she's doing something about it: She's refusing ...

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Students From Troubled For-Profit Colleges Refuse To Pay Back Loans

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

A group of students met with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Tuesday to send a message: They won't pay back the loans they incurred attending troubled for-profit colleges.

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In Congress, New Attention To Student-Privacy Fears

Monday, March 23, 2015

Several efforts in Washington are converging on the sensitive question of how best to safeguard the information software programs are gathering on students.

A proposed Student Digital Privacy and Parental Rights Act of 2015 is circulating in draft form. It has bipartisan sponsorship from Democratic Rep. Jared S. Polis of ...

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Questions To Ask About Ed-Tech At Your Kids' School

Thursday, March 19, 2015

When a 4-year-old comes home from pre-K proudly announcing that she spent her "choice time" playing on the computer, what's a parent to do?

Among public school classrooms, 97 percent have at least one computer — a stat that dates back to 2009, light-years ago in technology time. More ...

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Six Things We Learned At South By Southwest EDU

Sunday, March 15, 2015

The NPR Ed team is back from Austin, where we connected with hundreds of educators and people excited about education at the annual South By Southwest Edu Conference. As with many conferences, there's just as much to be gained from conversations in the hallways and chance encounters as from the ...

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