Streams

Amy Pearl

Amy Pearl appears in the following:

Salman Rushdie: On Global Literature and ... the Yankees

Monday, April 26, 2010

During author Salman Rushdie's visit to The Leonard Lopate Show to talk up the PEN World Voices Festival, we asked him a couple of questions. Here's what he told us:

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Hot Licks for a Cold Season

Wednesday, January 13, 2010

Fiddler extraordinaire Mark O'Connor pulled together two great jazz/blues players -- virtuoso bassist John Patitucci and baby-faced guitarist Julian Lage -- for a three-night run at the Blue Note last week. The trio made their radio debut on WNYC's Soundcheck.

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Mmmmmm...Meat.

Friday, January 08, 2010

Wild game is showing up on more and more restaurant menus these days. The editor-in-chief of Field and Stream had some cabin-to-condo tips on preparing venison.

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Geraldo Rivera on the role of Hispanics in Shaping America

Monday, September 14, 2009

Award-winning journalist Geraldo Rivera details the evolving role of Hispanics in shaping America's future. The Great Progression: How Hispanics Will Lead America to a New Era of Prosperity features interviews with prominent Hispanics, including Ken Salazar, Antonio Villaraigosa, and Jennifer Lopez, and looks at the growing impact Hispanics are making ...

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Rod Blagojevich on his book "The Governor"

Monday, September 14, 2009

Former Illinois governor Rod Blagojevich offers an account of his arrest and the subsequent media storm that engulfed him after he was caught up in a political scandal this year. In his book The Governor, he describes his view of politics and government.

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Jeff Johnson on Discovering Your Personal Best

Monday, September 14, 2009

Jeff Johnson, BET correspondent and the author of Everything Im Not Made Me Everything I Am: Discovering Your Personal Best, discusses his new book and his documentary about Kurdistan.

Listen to the whole interview:

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Beth Fertig on Why Can't You Teach Me 2 Read?

Thursday, September 10, 2009

Beth Fertig, WNYC reporter and author of Why Can't You Teach Me 2 Read?, explores urban schools through the story of three NYC students who made it to high school without being able to read.

Listen to the whole interview:

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Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn on Developing Women

Tuesday, September 08, 2009

New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn offer a call-to-arms to challenge the oppression of women worldwide in their new book, Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide (Knopf, 2009).

Listen to the whole interview:

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Annette Bernhardt and Amy Carroll on Unprotected Workers

Thursday, September 03, 2009

A comprehensive new report reveals widespread abuse of low-wage workers in Chicago, Los Angeles, and New York. Annette Bernhardt, policy co-director of the National Employment Law Project and co-author of the new report, Broken Laws, Unprotected Workers, discusses the findings. Plus, Amy Carroll, supervising ...

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James Barron on 549 Stories

Friday, August 28, 2009

James Barron, New York Times Metro Section reporter, discusses his compilation of stories, The New York Times' Book of New York: 549 Stories of the People, the Streets, and the Life of the City Past and Present.

Listen to the whole interview:
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Rebecca Cammisa on Which Way Home

Monday, August 24, 2009

Director Rebecca Cammisa discusses her feature-length documentary "Which Way Home," which follows three unaccompanied children as they leave their homes in Latin America and travel through Mexico to the U.S. border in order to reunite ...

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Judith Matloff on Home Girl

Friday, August 21, 2009

Judith Matloff explains why, after 20 years as a foreign correspondent, she decided to put down roots in New York by buying a dilapidated brownstone on a rough block in West Harlem. She tells the ...

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103 Reasons the Back of Your Neck is All Sweaty and Gritty

Friday, August 21, 2009

The temperature was 103 degrees Friday afternoon on the Number 1 train platform at 72nd Street

The temperature was 103 degrees Friday afternoon on the Number 1 train platform at 72nd Street

Make no mistake, it's hot and sticky out there.

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Welcome to New York. Enjoy the Oysters

Thursday, August 20, 2009

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New York City is the former oyster capitol of the world. There was a time when New York Harbor had over 350 square miles of oyster beds, half of the world supply. Street-side oyster vendors were as popular as hot dog carts are today. Local oysters were a delicious treat, they cleaned the waterways and they bolstered aquatic wildlife. But oysters have since disappeared from New York Harbor, mostly because of human intervention. Now, there are new efforts to reintroduce them in Jamaica Bay.

Mark Kurlansky, the author of The Big Oyster: History on the Half Shell, and Jeffrey Levinton, distinguished professor of ecology and evolution at SUNY Stony Brook, visit The Brian Lehrer Show to talk about the history of oysters in New York Harbor, and plans to reintroduce them.

Listen to the whole show:

Andrea Bernstein: Let's start with a history. I'm very intrigued by this idea of oysters being sold like hot dogs.

Mark Kurlansky: Well, oysters are an animal that lives in brackish water, which is water that's saltier than fresh water but not as salty as the sea. Estuaries of rivers, places where fresh water dumps into sea water are the ideal climate. New Yorkers too easily forget that the five boroughs of New York City are at the magnificent estuary of the Hudson River and the estuary used to be full of oysters.

That means the East River and the Hudson and out in the harbor around Staten Island and Liberty Island and Ellis Island, which used to be called Big and Little Oyster Island. The coast of the Bronx, back when the Bronx had a non-industrial coast, and the Brooklyn coast into Queens and Jamaica...it was all full of oysters. There was this tremendous natural resource that was identified with New York so that, for centuries, if somebody said they were going to New York City, the typical response was 'Enjoy the oysters!' They were sold everywhere.

Bernstein: Until when?

Kurlansky: Until 1927 when the last bed was closed. A process began in the 1880's when they started understanding about germs. There were chronic epidemics in New York history and they never really understood the cause of them. Everybody sort of assumed that it must be caused by foreigners and immigration and poverty. Then they started understanding what really caused things like cholera and developed the ability to trace them. They kept tracing them to oyster beds. One by one, with each disease outbreak, a bed was closed. The last bed, which was in Raritan Bay between Staten Island and New Jersey, was closed in 1927. Then it was over.

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The Wisdom (or not) of Twitter

Wednesday, August 19, 2009

David Pogue, the personal technology writer for The New York Times, visited The Brian Lehrer Show to talk about his new book The World According to Twitter.

Listen to the whole intervew:

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UNDP Report Reveals Unemployment, Malnutrition in Arab World

Wednesday, August 19, 2009

Seven years ago, the United Nations conducted a study of human development in the Arab world. Now it has released a follow up and there’s not a lot of good news for the 330 million ...

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Dan Klores on Black Magic

Tuesday, August 18, 2009

In his documentary "Black Magic", filmmaker Dan Klores looks at how African-American players and coaches changed the game of basketball. The film won a Peabody and has just been released on DVD.

Listen to the ...

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Studio 360's Kurt Andersen on "Casino Economy"

Tuesday, August 18, 2009

According to Studio 360's Kurt Andersen, the economic crisis might have an upside. His latest book is called Reset.

Listen to the whole interview:

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Cracking Your Knuckles: Annoying But Doesn't Cause Arthritis

Friday, August 14, 2009

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Should you wait an hour after eating before you jump in the pool? Do you lose most of your body heat through your head? Dr. Aaron Carroll is the co-author of Don't Swallow Your Gum! Myths, Half-Truths, and Outright Lies ...

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Do The Right Thing 20 Years Later

Friday, August 14, 2009

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Spike Lee's 'Do The Right Thing' came out 20 years ago. Kai Wright, senior writer for The Root, and Dayo Olopade, political reporter for The Root, talk about the impact of the movie with Brian Lehrer.

Listen to the whole ...

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