Streams

When the Amish Go High Tech

« previous episode | next episode »

Monday, September 30, 2013

Amish and Mennonite communities are often perceived as being "anti-technology," but their relationship with technology is more nuanced than that.  They examine what the technology is, what it offers and then decide whether to accept it in their lives.  Call it the "Amish Algorithm."

Hear from the Amish liaison who was crucial to helping these cutting-edge geneticists gain the communities' trust on this week's New Tech City, coming Wednesday.

That approach is evident at the Clinic for Special Children in Strasburg, Pennsylvania. Doctors and researchers work with residents of the nearby religious communities to diagnose and help treat genetic disorders like Maple Syrup Urine disease and Chicken Breast Syndrome, both fatal diseases if not treated.  Because these communities are closed and have smaller gene pools, rare genetic disorders like these have a high rate of occurrence; advances in technology help them save lives

Where do you draw the line when it comes to technology in your life?  Tell us @newtechcity #myline.

 

NYC Gets 'LEED for Broadband' and More Free Public WiFi

Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced two initiatives Monday he said will keep New York City's tech sector on an upward trajectory for years to come. 

Comment

News, weather, Radiolab, Brian Lehrer and more.
Get the best of WNYC in your inbox, every morning.

Comments [1]

I really enjoy your program and strongly approve that you have broadened your approach to include other forms of technology then IT.

Oct. 04 2013 02:59 AM

Leave a Comment

Register for your own account so you can vote on comments, save your favorites, and more. Learn more.
Please stay on topic, be civil, and be brief.
Email addresses are never displayed, but they are required to confirm your comments. Names are displayed with all comments. We reserve the right to edit any comments posted on this site. Please read the Comment Guidelines before posting. By leaving a comment, you agree to New York Public Radio's Privacy Policy and Terms Of Use.