Inequality in the Trump Era, Scientific Censorship, Singing the Blues in St. Louis

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Coming up on today's show:

  • On Friday, the Trump Administration disclosed the financial statuses of its top officials, and the disclosure once again calls into question the interests of the administration. Steven Fazzari, a professor of economics and sociology at Washington University in St. Louis, joins The Takeaway to discuss where income inequality might be going under President Trump. 
  • A year and a half after the Ferguson Commission released their "Forward Through Ferguson" report, some activists say the city hasn't made enough changes. Amy Hunter, manager of diversity and inclusion for St. Louis Children's Hospital and a long-time activist from Ferguson, weighs in. 
  • Last night, South Carolina won their first NCAA Women's Basketball Championship, and tonight in the men's bracket, it's a battle against two No. 1 seeds. Mechelle Voepel, a columnist for ESPNW and ESPN.com, looks at the win by the lady Gamecocks, and explains what to expect from Monday night's game. 

  • Victoria Herrmann, managing director of The Arctic Institute, a Gates Scholar at Cambridge University, and a National Geographic Explorer, has found that under the Trump Administration, her citations are being deleted. She discusses the consequences of scientific censorship today on The Takeaway. 
  • Police and students clashed over the weekend in Caracas, Venezuela — authorities are trying to quell both domestic and international outcry after the Venezuela Supreme Court seized power from the National Assembly last week, effectively dissolving the elected legislature. Carolina Acosta-Alzuru, a journalism professor at the University of Georgia and a native of Venezuela, examines this growing political crisis.
  • It's been a year since the National Blues Museum in St. Louis opened its doors. The Takeaway tours the museum and talks to some of St. Louis' best blues artists, including Dion Brown, founding executive director of the National Blues Museum; Charles "Skeet" Rodgers, one of St. Louis' best blues musicians; and Uvee Hayes, a St. Louis-based blues and soul singer.