New Precedent for the Press, Properties Around the World, Violence at Standing Rock

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President-elect Donald Trump gives a thumbs-up to the crowd as he leaves the New York Times building following a meeting, Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2016, in New York.
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  • Over the past few days, President-elect Trump has defied all norms of the presidential relationship with the media including criticizing a group of television anchors at a meeting earlier this week and then canceling and rescheduling a meeting with The New York Times. Former Executive editor of the New York Times Bill Keller talks about the precedent he is setting for this administration’s relationship with the media. 

  • After promising during the campaign that he would separate himself from the Trump Organization, Donald Trump tweeted on Monday that “it was well known that I have interests in properties all over the world.” Kenneth A. Gross, a partner at an international law firm who advises corporations and elected officials on ethics laws, examines the complexity of business ethics in the White House.

  • New Jersey Senator Cory Booker, who is being tapped as a future leader of the party, talks about the future of the Democratic Party after the stunning defeat of Hillary Clinton

  • South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley has been nominated for Ambassador to the United Nations. Nancy Soderberg, who held the same job under Bill Clinton, explains the position and this new development.

  • As part of our ongoing partnership with News Deeply, we hear from Fatima Askira, executive director of the Borno Women Development Initiative, who is working to rehabilitate women held by Boko Haram in Nigeria and helping them reintegrate into civilian society.

  • It has been a trying week for protesters at the Dakota Access pipeline, with conflicting reports of violence and police firing on protesters with water cannons in freezing weather. Tara Houska, a Brown professor and national campaigns director for Honor the Earth, shares her experience on the ground.

  • Almost 10 million children between the ages of 10 and 17 in this country are food insecure, meaning they don't have reliable access to enough nutritious food. Three teenagers from Portland, Oregon talk about their involvement in Home Forward, a service organization in the state.