White Nationalism in The White House, Muslims for Trump, The Paris Attacks One Year Later

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A demonstrator poses for a photo in front of a wall of signs against President-elect Donald Trump during a demonstration in downtown Los Angeles on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2016.
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Coming up on today's show:

  • On the campaign trail, President-elect Donald Trump promised to cut off federal funding for so-called “sanctuary cities," a name given to 300 cities and local jurisdictions that have ignored policies that ask local law enforcement to target undocumented immigrants. Betsy Hodges, the mayor of Minneapolis, a place that's been called a "sanctuary city," looks at the proposed immigration policies of the president-elect. 
  • President-elect Donald Trump has named two of his first hires: GOP Chairman Reince Priebus will be chief of staff, and Stephen Bannon, a white nationalist figure, will have a West Wing office as chief strategist and senior counselor to the president. Meanwhile, The Democratic National Committee is reeling from Donald Trump's victory, and talking about who will lead the DNC.  Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich explains.
  • Since the Second World War, the U.S. has been both a keeper and defender of international order. But Jeet Heer, a senior editor at The New Republic, argues that the United States can no longer hold that position under a Trump administration. 
  • Our partners at the Retro Report documentary team explore how the 1985 "Live Aid" global concerts used to raise funds for the Ethiopian famine led to other successful social activism campaigns. Bonnie Bertram, a producer with Retro Report, weighs in. 
  • Yesterday was the one year anniversary of the Paris attacks. How do the French feel about their personal safety now, and the safety of their country as a new American leader takes office? For answers, we turn to Samuel Laurent, author of "Al-Qaeda in France."
  • Who are the silent Donald Trump supporters who turned out in droves to support their candidate on Tuesday? One of them is Asra Nomani, a Muslim woman, a former Wall Street Journal reporter, and a co-founder of the Muslim Reform Movement. She explains why she supports the president-elect.