Black History Month on WNYC

Email a Friend
Million Man March, Washington D.C. 1995

Black History Month on WNYC

WNYC marks Black History Month with specials every weeknight at 9pm on 93.9FM during the week of February 13th. The lineup includes “Historically Black,” a new three-part series from APM Reports and The Washington Post, hosted by Michele Norris and narrated by Keegan-Michael Key, Roxane Gay, Issa Rae, and Another Round podcast duo Heben Nigatu and Tracy Clayton. The specials were created in coordination with the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C., and explore compelling and personal stories of black history through interviews and archival sound and music.

Additionally, the New York Public Radio Archives has pulled together some of the department's leading preservation work, series and sonic artifacts concerning African-American history. You can explore it here. 


 

On Being

Listen Monday, February 13 at 9pm on 93.9FM, or stream online at wnyc.org

Where does it hurt? That’s a question the civil rights icon Ruby Sales learned to ask during the days of that movement. It’s a question we scarcely know how to ask in public life now, but it gets at human dynamics that we are living and reckoning with. At a convening of 20 theologians seeking to re-imagine the public good of theology for this century, Ruby Sales unsettles some of what we think we know about the force of religion in civil rights history, and names a “spiritual crisis of white America” as a calling of this time. Listen here.


Historically Black

Listen Tuesday - Thursday, February 14-16 at 9pm on 93.9FM, or stream online at wnyc.org

The Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. has opened up a world of stories that visitors are flocking to discover. To mark the September 2016 opening of the museum, The Washington Post invited people across the country to submit photographs of objects in their family that connect them personally to black history. APM Reports teamed up with The Post to create a series that spotlights some of those objects and the stories behind them.

Episode #1
Tuesday, February 14 at 9pm on 93.9FM

Featuring: An exploration on the question of black identity in America through the voices of people who, at one time or another, have had to answer the question: “What are you?” Plus, a feature on love among African American couples, including the history of marriage for black Americans and the time when it was illegal for slaves to wed. Hosted by Michele Norris. Narrated by Roxane Gay and Another Round podcast duo Heben Nigatu and Tracy ClaytonListen here.

Episode #2
Wednesday, February 15 at 9pm on 93.9FM

Featuring: African American women recall assisting NASA warplane designs during World War II, and the discrimination they faced in the process. A young woman and her father remember the Million Man March of 1995 and how the event changed his life. And a profile on Harlem Renaissance photographer James Van Der Zee who documented black New York for much of the 20th century. Hosted by Michele Norris. Narrated by Keegan-Michael Key and Roxane GayListen here.

Episode #3
Thursday, February 16 at 9pm on 93.9FM

Featuring: Members of a Tennessee family talk about their great-great-grandfather, a slave owned by his white, biological father. A profile on celebrated fiddle played Bill Driver, whose music often revealed the complicated nature of interracial mixing in the Jim Crow era. And a look at how William Hooper Councill became the first president of one of the oldest HBCUs in the country. Hosted by Michele Norris. Narrated by Issa Rae and Another Round podcast duo Heben Nigatu and Tracy ClaytonListen here.


State of Siege: Mississippi Whites and the Civil Rights Movement

Listen Friday, February 17 at 9pm on 93.9FM, or stream online at wnyc.org

Mississippi occupies a distinct and dramatic place in the history of America's civil rights movement. No state in the South was more resistant to the struggle for black equality. No place was more violent. Drawing on archival audio and groundbreaking research on the civil rights era, this special from APM Reports brings to light the extraordinary tactics whites in Mississippi used to battle integration and the lasting impact of that battle in American politics today. Listen here.