Streams

Daily Schedule

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  • 12:00 AM
    BBC World Service
  • The world’s largest and oldest public broadcaster delivers on-the-ground reporting and in-depth analysis from every corner of the globe.

  • 05:00 AM
    Morning Edition
  • You know what that smooth jazz riff means: it’s your morning companion from NPR and the WNYC Newsroom, with world news, local features, and weather updates. Don’t start your day without it.

  • 09:00 AM
    BBC World Service
  • The world’s largest and oldest public broadcaster delivers on-the-ground reporting and in-depth analysis from every corner of the globe.

  • 10:00 AM
    The Brian Lehrer Show
  • SCOTUS Cases; State of Cancer Treatment; SAT Prep; Frugal Flying

    This week the Supreme Court docket includes challenges to the same-sex marriage cases of DOMA and Proposition 8. New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman explains what the outcomes might mean for New Yorkers. Plus: John Katzman of the Princeton Review on acing the ACT and SAT; an update on the state of cancer treatment; and what data tells us about how to travel on the cheap.

  • 12:00 PM
    The Leonard Lopate Show
  • Electronic Trash, The Bronfman Haggadah, "The Flick" on Stage, and Manhattan's Grid

    Flat-screen televisions and monitors are harder to recycle than their older counterparts. On today’s showwe'll find out what’s happening to this new kind of trash. Edgar M. Bronfman and illustrator Jan Aronson talk about their new version of the Haggadah. Annie Baker talks about her latest play, “The Flick,” along with actor Matthew Maher. And, we’ll hear the little-known story of John Randel, Jr., the man who invented Manhattan’s street grid in the 19th century.

  • 02:00 PM
    Fresh Air
  • The Peabody Award-winning program features Terry Gross’ fearless and insightful interviews with big names in pop culture, politics and the arts.

  • 03:00 PM
    The Takeaway
  • Gay Rights and Religion, Cyprus, and the Genetic Info You Didn't Ask For

    Growing Up with Gay Parents | Cyprus Lawmakers Hope for Bailout | The Genetic Information You Didn't Ask For | Are Gay Rights More Akin to Civil Rights or Religious Rights?

  • 04:00 PM
    All Things Considered
  • A wrap-up of the day’s news, with features and interviews about the latest developments in New York City and around the world, from NPR and the WNYC newsroom.

  • 06:30 PM
    Marketplace
  • Marketplace is not only about money and business, but about people, local economies and the world — and what it all means to us.

  • 07:00 PM
    All Things Considered
  • A wrap-up of the day’s news, with features and interviews about the latest developments in New York City and around the world, from NPR and the WNYC newsroom.

  • 08:00 PM
    Studio 360
  • Virtual Choirs & Marriage in the Movies

    This week in Studio 360, we meet Eric Whitacre, the rock star of contemporary choral music, who has a secret to his success: forming choirs online. We look for marital advice from the movies, but film historian Jeanine Basinger raises a cautionary note: a marriage isn’t good drama, or funny, ...

  • 09:00 PM
    Soundcheck
  • When The Circus Came To Soundcheck; The Waterboys

    In This Episode: The Scottish-led, Dublin-based band The Waterboys have been making a unique blend of Celtic folk rock since 1983. They set the poetry of W.B. Yeats to music in our studio.

    Plus: The Ringling Bros & Barnum Bailey Circus has set up the proverbial big top at Barclays Center in Brooklyn. The circus’ composer, Michael Picton, talks about creating music for the show. And historian Janet Davis of University of Texas-Austin talks about the sound of the "golden age" of the circus

    Later: From “Tears of a Clown” to “The Show Must Go On,” the Soundcheck team puts together a playlist of circus-related pop music.

  • 10:00 PM
    Q with Jian Ghomeshi
  • A hip, energetic daily arts and culture program hosted by writer and musician Jian Ghomeshi, one of Canada’s foremost tastemakers.

  • 11:00 PM
    New Sounds
  • Choral Music Without Words

    Hear choral works that make use of a choir for color and texture, rather than the delivery of a text on this New Sounds.  From violinist and composer Timba Harris, listen to an album length suite of pieces about the Cascade Mountains at the time of Mount St. Helens’ eruption in 1980.  His “neXus I: Cascadia” features a big choir and minimal strings and electronics, depicting a monarch butterfly, black bear, and the flora and fauna in the in the Pacific Northwest affected by the eruption of the volcano. Also, listen to a work without words written for vocal octet Roomful of Teeth, called “AEIOU,” by Ecstatic Music Festival founder and composer Judd Greenstein. Plus, the vocal ensemble, New York Polyphony, makes over the medieval into something modern with their remix of a Gregorian chant piece.  And more.