Streams

Daily Schedule

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  • 12:00 AM
    The Leonard Lopate Show
  • Feeding Frenzy

    Melissa Clark discusses how to make the most of this fall’s amazing produce selections. Tori Hogan suggests ways foreign aid can be improved to benefit more people. Tarun Tejpal discusses his novel The Story of My Assassin, based on real events. We’ll have our latest look at the economy and the election. Plus, our latest Backstory segment.

  • 02:00 AM
    BBC World Service
  • The world’s largest and oldest public broadcaster delivers on-the-ground reporting and in-depth analysis from every corner of the globe.

  • 05:00 AM
    Morning Edition
  • You know what that smooth jazz riff means: it’s your morning companion from NPR and the WNYC Newsroom, with world news, local features, and weather updates. Don’t start your day without it.

  • 09:00 AM
    BBC World Service
  • The world’s largest and oldest public broadcaster delivers on-the-ground reporting and in-depth analysis from every corner of the globe.

  • 10:00 AM
    The Brian Lehrer Show
  • By the Numbers

    Filmmakers Sarah Burns and David McMahon discuss the NYPD subpoena of outtakes from their new documentary (with Ken Burns) on the Central Park Five. Plus: what today’s jobs report means for the election; the consequences of Iran’s currency inflation; former astronaut Dr. Mae Jemison on interstellar travel; and following up on hydrofracking in the southern tier of New York State.

  • 12:00 PM
    The Leonard Lopate Show
  • Order in the Court

    Jeffrey Toobin, of The New Yorker and CNN, takes a close look at the Supreme Court’s often contentious relationship with the White House. Janet Wallach tells the story of America’s first female tycoon, Hetty Green. Louise Erdrich discusses her new novel, The Round House. Please Explain is all about cloud computing and data barns.

  • 02:00 PM
    Science Friday
  • Break through the rumors and confusion about “this study” or “that study” with Ira Flatow’s clear, weekly conversation about what’s happening in science.

  • 03:00 PM
    The Takeaway
  • Today's Takeaway | October 5, 2012

    Small Business Owners React to Jobs Report | Don't Mention It: Gun Violence | New Movie Releases: 'Taken 2,' 'Frankenweenie,' 'The Paperboy' | Toledo, Ohio Mayor Says Stop Bashing China | Lee Daniels on "The Paperboy"

  • 04:00 PM
    All Things Considered
  • A wrap-up of the day’s news, with features and interviews about the latest developments in New York City and around the world, from NPR and the WNYC newsroom.

  • 06:30 PM
    Marketplace
  • Marketplace is not only about money and business, but about people, local economies and the world — and what it all means to us.

  • 07:00 PM
    All Things Considered
  • A wrap-up of the day’s news, with features and interviews about the latest developments in New York City and around the world, from NPR and the WNYC newsroom.

  • 08:00 PM
    On The Media
  • Anatomy of a Publicity Stunt, The Problem with 'Muslim Rage', and more

    Breaking down David Blaine's latest publicity stunt, Nate Silver on predictions, and how the media got the "Muslim Rage" story all wrong.

  • 09:00 PM
    Soundcheck
  • Crying Time and Callers (the Band)

    On the heels of yesterday's look at sad music in movies, John explores different corners of the sad-song genre with Adam Brent Houghtaling, author of the book This Will End in Tears. Later, the Brooklyn-based band Callers offers up their sad song, ...

  • 10:00 PM
    Q
  • An energetic daily arts and culture program from the CBC. Formerly Q with Jian Ghomeshi.

  • 11:00 PM
    New Sounds
  • Hijaz

    For this New Sounds, hear a work by Michael Harrison, called "Hijaz."  The composition features the Young People’s Chorus delivering vowels, South Indian rhythmic and tabla syllables, and a universal prayer as the text.  Together with new music heavyweight/adventure cellist Maya Beiser, the versatile composer/percussionist Payton MacDonald (Alarm Will Sound, Super Marimba), and the composer Michael Harrison on just-intonation piano, the new work is intended to invoke a sense of pilgrimage.