Streams

Todd Zwillich

Washington Correspondent, The Takeaway

Todd Zwillich appears in the following:

Protests Continue in Egypt As Demands Grow for Morsi to Step Down

Tuesday, July 02, 2013

After millions took to the streets on Sunday, protests continue in Egypt where hundreds of thousands continue to demand the ouster of the democratically elected President Mohamed Morsi. Omar Khalifa is the director of Egypt’s O Media and was skeptical of President Morsi’s regime from the beginning. He's been participating in the protests in Egypt that he says are overwhelming in scale. Khalifa joins The Takeaway to discuss the protests and the possible next steps in Egypt.

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The Economics of Food: Cookbooks and Global Development

Tuesday, July 02, 2013

Having a large amount of diversity in our food can enrich our lives. But how come it's so hard to find cookbooks and restaurants that serve more exotic cuisines? Economist and author Tyler Cowen argues that it is global development and standardization that is keeping us from having a larger amount of options for food.

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Takeaway Host John Hockberry Checks in From Africa

Tuesday, July 02, 2013

Takeaway Host John Hockenberry is in southern Africa all this week and is looking at the economic realities on the ground there. In townships where the economy and putting food on the table are daily concerns, people in southern Africa are looking beyond symbolic leadership in the hopes of seeing real change.

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19 Firefighters Killed in Arizona Wildfire

Monday, July 01, 2013

Arizona resident and officials are reeling from the biggest loss of life due to a wildfire in 30 years. At least 19 firefighters died this weekend battling a wildfire in the Central Arizona town of Yarnell, located about 80 miles northwest of Phoenix. The fire started on Friday and spread rapidly amid high heat, low humidity and strong winds. Fernanda Santos, reporter for our partner The New York Times, has the latest developments.

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The Changing Mission of the All-American Paratroopers

Monday, July 01, 2013

The 82 Airborne Division, the Army’s rapid-response force for global crises, is undergoing training exercises aimed at improving its ability to handle chemical weapons attacks. Major General John W. Nicholson Jr., the Commander of the 82nd Airborne Division, sheds light on the paratrooper's changing mission.

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Nelson Mandela's Lifelong Friend Reflects on the Ailing Leader

Monday, July 01, 2013

Before John left for Africa, he sat down to reflect on the sentiments of South Africans as they prepare for the passing of one of history's greatest leaders and peace activists. Denis Goldberg was a co-defendant with Nelson Mandela at the Rivonia trial in the Pretoria Supreme Court in 1963.

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C.E.O. Pay Continues to Climb

Monday, July 01, 2013

What does an annual raise look like to the top 200 chief executives at public companies? Try more than 1 million dollars. In 2012, the median pay package for CEO's was $15.1 million, a 16 percent increase from 2011. New York Times reporter Gretchen Morgenson tells us how executive salaries have become sky-high.

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Millions of Egyptians Take to the Streets to Demand Morsi's Resignation

Monday, July 01, 2013

On the one year anniversary of the election of Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, hundreds of thousands gathered in Tahrir Square, and millions across the country, demanding his resignation. Michael Wahid-Hanna, a senior fellow at the Century Foundation, discusses the protests and the future stability of Egypt. And Dalia Ziada, an Egyptian blogger and activist, reports from Cairo on the unrest there.

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Special Session Marks Round Two in Texas Abortion Battle

Monday, July 01, 2013

Last Tuesday, Senator Wendy Davis filibustered her way to the national stage after spending nearly 11 hours speaking in order to block Senate Bill 5 from passing in the Texas legislature. But the very next day, Texas Governor Rick Perry announced he wasn’t giving up the fight just yet. Instead, the Governor called a special legislative session to take up the bill. Erica Greider is the senior editor at Texas Monthly.

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The Battle of Gettysburg, 150 Years Later

Monday, July 01, 2013

When Union and Confederate soldiers clashed at the Battle of Gettysburg, 150 years ago today, The Saturday Evening Post sent reporters to cover the fighting. Today, the Post is one of the few remaining publications that covered the Civil War, as the magazine began printing in 1821. Jeff Nilsson, director of archives for The Saturday Evening Post, remembers the battle and its legacy.

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Connecting the Voices of Democracy

Friday, June 28, 2013

Today, the overarching symbol of democracy is popular discontent—from Turkey and Bulgaria, to Brazil and again this weekend in Egypt, the language and the time zones may change, but the voice of their protest is increasingly the same. According to Columbia University Professor Alfred Stepan, these protests are a direct reflection of the levels of democratic consolidation in the countries at hand.

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New Mexico County Bans Hydrofracking

Friday, June 28, 2013

While industry experts point to hydrofracking's possibilities for U.S. energy independence, some are extremely concerned about the consequences for the environment, particularly ground water. For that reason, Mora County, New Mexico recently became the first county in the nation to ban hydraulic fracturing. Carrie Jung, reporter for KUMN, spoke with the county's commissioner, and discusses why the county decided to ban the practice.

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The New IVF: Genetic Material From 3 People

Friday, June 28, 2013

Normally babies are created with genetic material from two people—something that could soon change. According to The Gaurdian, the UK government is pushing "ahead with plans that would allow doctors to prevent major childhood diseases by creating IVF babies that have genetic material from three people." Doug Turnbull, Director of Welcome Trust Center for Mitrochondrial research at Newcastle University, pioneered the new IVF procedure and discusses this three person IVF treatment and the UK government's plans.

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Senator Angus King Leaning Towards Treason On Snowden

Friday, June 28, 2013

While Edward Snowden waits for his application for asylum in Ecuador to be processed, we bring the story back to American soil. Why was the leak such a big deal, and how can we maintain both security and privacy in its wake? Senator Angus King sits on the Senate Intelligence Committee and joins us to discuss how lawmakers intend to move forward. 

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New Movie Releases: 'The Heat,' 'White House Down,' '20 Feet from Stardom'

Friday, June 28, 2013

Every Friday The Takeaway looks at the new films set to open up at the box office. In this week's look, our resident Movie Date Podcast team—Rafer Guzman, film critic for Newsday, and Kristen Meinzer, Culture Producer for The Takeaway—discuss the new releases "The Heat," "White House Down" and "20 Feet from Stardom."

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Immigration Legislation Clears the Senate, Heads to House to Meet its Fate

Friday, June 28, 2013

We are one step closer to adopting the most significant immigration overhaul in the nation’s history—the Senate passed the reform bill yesterday in a 68-to-32 vote. Now it is headed to the Republican-controlled House of Representatives to meet its fate. But Diana Furchtgott-Roth, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, thinks the economic benefits of the Senate's plan may be too good to pass up.

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President Obama's Trip to Africa Draws Protesters

Friday, June 28, 2013

President Obama heads to Senegal, South Africa and Tanzania this week for a trip that will focus on trade and investment relations. But not everyone in these countries is excited about his trip.  Lerato Mbele is a South African journalist and co-host of BBC's Newsday. She reports from Johannesburg on President Obama's mixed reception and how it compares to the "Obamania" of 5 years ago.

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A Step Forward for Immigration Reform

Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Yesterday the Senate got behind a plan to increase security along the US-Mexico border. In a 67-27 vote, Senators agreed to double the number of agents along the border and finish 700 miles of fencing—a plan with a price tag of roughly $40 billion over the next 10 years. Todd Zwillich, Takeaway Washington Correspondent, is with us to discuss this development.

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Supreme Court Sidesteps Affirmative Action Ruling

Monday, June 24, 2013

The U.S. Supreme Court seems to have avoided a big decision in the affirmative action case, Fisher vs. The University of Texas. The Court essentially issued a non-ruling, sending the case back to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals to rehear the case. To find out what this sidestep means, we welcome Kareem Crayton, professor of law at the University of North Carolina Law School.

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Farm Bill Killed by Bipartisan Opposition in the House

Friday, June 21, 2013

Yesterday, in a bipartisan vote, the House of Representatives rejected all $940 billion dollars worth of the farm bill. Democrats opposed the bill because it cut food stamps for low-income families by $20.5 billion over a decade. On the other hand, Republicans were upset that the bill didn't cut enough. The result was 195 yeas and 234 nays. The Takeaway’s Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich reports on the surprising defeat from Washington D.C.

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