Streams

Todd Zwillich

Washington Correspondent, The Takeaway

Todd Zwillich appears in the following:

Transit Workers in San Fran Temporarily End Strike as Talks Continue

Friday, July 05, 2013

Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) workers are back on the job—at least for now. BART and its unions reached an agreement late last night to extend current employment contracts for 30 days, which will be sending workers, who were striking since Monday, back on the job. Joining The Takeaway to discuss the strike and future negotiations—and what the situation is like on the ground for struggling travelers—is Dan Brekke, news editor at KQED.

Comment

Egypt: Is This a Coup or a Popular Revolution?

Friday, July 05, 2013

In the days following the ouster of Egypt's first democratically elected president, Mohamed Morsi, a mix of celebrations in support of the change, and demonstrations against it, have filled the streets. Joining us to discuss the situation on the ground and the way forward for Egypt is Mona Makram-Ebeid, a political science professor at the American University in Cairo and a former member of parliament in Egypt—a position she resigned on Saturday. Also on the program is Shadi Hamid, director of research at the Brookings Doha Center.

Comments [2]

Hotshot Firefighter Deaths Result of "The Perfect Storm"

Friday, July 05, 2013

Days after 19 firefighters were killed in a massive wildfire in Arizona, details are now emerging about how the Granite Mountain Interagency Hotshot Crew were overtaken by the flames and the conditions that rapidly changed that led to their deaths. Cindy Carcamo, staff reporter for The Los Angeles Times, and her colleagues got an exclusive on the first detailed explanation of what happened on Sunday. According to her report the Hotshot crew "suddenly were encircled by a dense cloud of smoke and flame." 

Comment

Is the Media's Reporting on Syria Based in Reality?

Friday, July 05, 2013

Patrick Cockburn, Middle East correspondent for The Independent, just returned from Syria and he views media reports on the country with a skeptical eye. In fact, Cockburn, a veteran foreign correspondent, says he can't think of any other war or crisis he's covered in which propagandist, biased or second-hand sources have been so readily accepted as fact.

Comments [1]

Olympians Of A Certain Age

Friday, July 05, 2013

Many of us see our golden years as a time when we can sit back, relax, and leave our strenuous days behind us. But for the athletes featured in the new documentary, "Age of Champions," the retirement years are anything but retiring. Profiling five athletes, "Age of Champions" celebrates swimmers, tennis players, basketball players, and pole vaulters, all of whom are between the ages of 72 and 100 years-old, as they compete in the National Senior Olympic Games.

Comments [1]

Renewed Call to Change Redskins Mascot Raises Questions About Global Brands

Friday, July 05, 2013

A call for the Washington Redskins to change their name is picking up steam again in Washington with the announcement last month that 10 members of Congress spoke out against the franchise’s mascot. But Redskins executives are adamant about maintaining the tradition inherent in their name and mascot, and say it would be incredibly difficult to change. Suzan Shown Harjo is a Native American activist who filed a lawsuit against the team in 1992, which was won and then later overturned. Gabe Feldman is the director of Tulane University’s Sports Law Program.

Comments [3]

Looking Ahead to the Next Steps in Egypt

Thursday, July 04, 2013

Did the protests undermined the elections that took place a year ago? Was Morsi not given the chance to carry out his leadership as the freely elected leader of Egypt? Will the military and Adli Monsour, chief justice of Egypt's Supreme Constitutional Court, be able to move the country in a new direction? Joining The Takeaway to examine these questions and to look at the next steps for Egypt is David Kirkpatrick, Cairo bureau chief for our partner The New York Times.

Comment

Egypt Brings New Challenges for U.S. Role in Middle East

Thursday, July 04, 2013

The ouster of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi and the start of an interim government could offer a new set of complications for the United States and it's role in the Middle East. Joining The Takeaway is David Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for our partner The New York Times. Sanger sheds light on the situation in Egypt and how it could affect the United States' strategic interests in the Middle East.

Comment

The New Movie Releases of July 4th Weekend

Thursday, July 04, 2013

Independence Day is of course one of Hollywood's favorite holidays. The box offices offer up some of summer's expected big hits. Hitting the theaters this weekend is Disney's "The Lone Ranger," the comedy concert film "Kevin Hart: Let Me Explain," and Steve Carell's kid flick "Despicable Me 2." Our Movie Date team, Rafer Guzman and Kristen Meinzer, weigh in with their reviews for this holiday weekend. 

Comment

Egyptian-Americans Weigh in on Nation's New Chapter

Thursday, July 04, 2013

For Egyptian-Americans, the definitions and ideas of freedom and independence are being tested as Egypt embarks on a new chapter. To reflect on this future, The Takeaway welcomes three Egyptian-Americans. Nancy Yousef is a professor of English at Baruch College. Sarah McGowan is an Egyptian-American who was born and raised in Dayton, Ohio, and Ahmed Soliman is a 37-year-old Egyptian-American attorney born in New York.

Comments [1]

Military Coup Staged in Egypt, Morsi Ousted as President

Wednesday, July 03, 2013

Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, who was elected democratically just one year ago, has officially stepped down from power. In addition to removing the president, the army has suspended the constitution and called for early elections.

Comment

Tensions in Egypt Intensify as Morsi Rejects Army Ultimatum

Wednesday, July 03, 2013

The situation in Egypt is quickly intensifying after President Mohamed Morsi rejected an army ultimatum to find a resolution to the protests. A ban on international travel has been placed on President Morsi and other Muslim Brotherhood members by security forces, and a senior aide to the president, Essam al-Hadded, has accused the military of staging a coup. Joining us on the ground in Cairo now is David Kirkpatrick, Cairo-bureau chief for our partner The New York Times.

Comments [1]

Key Requirement of Health Law Delayed Until 2015

Wednesday, July 03, 2013

The Affordable Care Act or Obamacare is President Obama's signature domestic law. The historic initiative could very well shape the narrative of his legacy. But the law is now partially on hold for one more year. Joining us to discuss this is Jeff Young, health care reporter at The Huffington Post.

Comments [2]

The Politics of Johnny Depp as Tonto

Wednesday, July 03, 2013

Johnny Depp plays Tonto, a Native America character, in the new Disney film “The Lone Ranger.” With Depp in the role, the long tradition of non-Native actors playing Tonto continues, which began back in 1933. But it’s not 1933 anymore—it’s 2013. Why does Hollywood still struggle in its depictions of Native peoples? Adrienne Keene is a blogger and activist with Native Appropriations, a website that examines the representations of native peoples in media. She joins The Takeaway to discuss her thoughts on the film, and the depiction of Tonto.

Comments [7]

Coping with Tragedy in Yarnell, Arizona

Wednesday, July 03, 2013

With the tragedy of the lost lives of 19 firemen in Yarnell, Arizona still fresh, many are wondering what they can do to help the community. Today, we're joined by Matt Moomaw, a former hotshot fireman from Colorado who now works as a therapist and is currently in the Yarnell community to offer support. Also on the program is Liz Kinney, Associate of the Wildland Firefighter Foundation. As the process of healing a community begins, Kinney and Moomaw examine the job of the hotshots and the next steps for Yarnell.

Comments [3]

First Same-Sex Married Couple Approved for Green Card

Wednesday, July 03, 2013

Just days after the Supreme Court delivered a legal milestone in the form of a ruling against the Defense of Marriage Act, Traian Popov and Julian Marsh celebrated a personal milestone. Friday was Julian's 55th birthday, and in the middle of a celebratory dinner, Traian got an email with some big news. His green card request had been approved—making them the first same-sex married couple to be approved to apply for a permanent resident visa. They join The Takeaway to discuss the news, and what it means for gay and immigrant rights.

Comments [1]

New Report Shows Church Shielded Funds From Clergy Victims

Tuesday, July 02, 2013

Timothy Dolan, the archbishop of New York, has long been considered one of the "good guys" of the Catholic Church. But new documents released this week by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Milwaukee paint a different picture of Dolan, who formerly served as archbishop there. Laurie Godstein broke this story yesterday. She is the national religion correspondent for our partner The New York Times and she joins The Takeaway to discuss these recent revelations.

Comments [1]

Snowden Pulls Request for Russian Aslyum

Tuesday, July 02, 2013

Edward Snowden remains in a transit area in the Moscow airport, but he has abandoned his request for asylum in Russia after Russian President Vladimir Putin said asylum would only be granted if Snowden ceases leaking classified information against the United States. Ellen Barry, Moscow Bureau Chief for our partner The New York Times, and Kimberly Marten, Political Science professor at Barnard College, join The Takeaway to discuss Putin's decision and the possible next steps for Snowden.

Comments [1]

Tulsa 2024: The Real Plan to Make OK the Home of the Summer Olympic Games

Tuesday, July 02, 2013

Tokyo, Rio, Athens, London and Sydney: What do these cities have in common? They’ve all hosted the modern Olympic games. And if Tulsa (yes, that Tulsa—the one in Oklahoma) has its way, it will soon join this prestigious list. Neil Mavis is spearheading the effort to make Tulsa the home of the 2024 Summer Olympic Games. And as he sees it, Tulsa isn’t just up for the task, it has more to offer than any other city in the world.

Comments [1]

The Yarnell Hill Wildfire Leaves Residents Displaced And In The Dark

Tuesday, July 02, 2013

It's been a devastating week for the residents of Yarnell, Arizona. The entire town has been evacuated after a raging wildfire destroyed hundreds of homes and took the lives of 19 firefighters. Yarnell Church Pastor Paul Jones, has been counting the seconds until he can reunite with his community and offer refuge for those needing relief. Pastor Jones joins The Takeaway to discuss the wildfire that is engulfing more than 8,300 acres.

Comment