Streams

Todd Zwillich

Washington Correspondent, The Takeaway

Todd Zwillich appears in the following:

Remembering Mary Travers

Thursday, September 17, 2009

Terrance McKnight, host of Evening Music on WNYC, explores the musical legacy of Mary Travers. Mary is best known for her work with the legendary folk trio Peter, Paul and Mary. She died of leukemia yesterday at the age of 72.

Here's Mary singing with Peter and Paul on the folk classic, "Blowin' in the Wind":

You know, the only group ... that I can think of in recent memory that had as much earnestness about social justice and politics as Peter, Paul and Mary, was Fugazi. A punk band from Washington D.C., known to a lot of people in an underground way, and they're not even playing any more... I don't know that there's a band around today that uses music in an earnest way, as Peter, Paul and Mary did.
--Todd Zwillich

Comment

The Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission (Say it Five Times Fast)

Thursday, September 17, 2009

Today the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission conducts its first public meeting. The commission is a bipartisan commission tasked with finding the root cause of the nation's financial meltdown. Louise Story, finance reporter for The New York Times, explains why we need yet another commission and what this group is hoping to uncover that we don't already know.

Comment

Rep. Joe Wilson and the Race Conversation

Thursday, September 17, 2009

Despite hopes that electing our first black president would usher in a "post-racial" era, race has become a prominent issue in the Obama presidency. From overt cases – the Henry Louis Gates incident – to more coded and/or ambiguous examples – the "birther" movement, Representative Joe Wilson's outburst on the House floor – racial flare-ups have featured prominently in the first seven months of this, our first African-American-led administration. Now, the conversation about Wilson's yell last week has increasingly turned to its racial implications. Earlier this week, former President Jimmy Carter said Wilson's outburst was racist. (The White House disagreed.) For two perspectives on the way this conversation is playing out, we speak to Mark Anthony Neal, professor of African American Studies at Duke University, and Joe Hicks, talk show host for KFI Radio in Los Angeles, California.

Comments [16]

Will Move For Work

Thursday, September 17, 2009

As the unemployment rate climbs, more people are having to relocate in order to find work. Almost 20% of Americans who took new jobs in July moved in order to get them. The Takeaway's finance contributor Beth Kobliner talks about the challenges — and opportunities — of a national job search. We also hear from Jeff Gilbert, who moved last year from outside Detroit to Wyoming, Ohio to take a job as general manager of a commercial manufacturing company.

Comment

Folk Music Icon Mary Travers Dead at 72

Thursday, September 17, 2009

Mary Travers, better-known as "Mary" from the 60's folk trio Peter, Paul and Mary, has died of leukemia at the age of 72. Jack Grace, The Takeaway's music contributor, joins us with a look back at the life and legacy of one of America's most beloved folk heroes.

Here's Peter, Paul and Mary performing one of their most famous songs, "Puff the Magic Dragon":

Comment

EU Deems Third of Afghan Votes Suspect

Thursday, September 17, 2009

Preliminary tallies in the second-ever Afghan presidential election show incumbent President Hamid Karzai leading in the polls with 55% of the votes. But the cloud of suspicions about the election is not going away; yesterday, European Union monitors estimated that one third of the votes for Hamid Karzai are suspect. The Karzai campaign dismissed the EU findings, and the latest official results show that he has enough votes to win without a run-off — if the disputed votes are included. Rand Corporation's Christine Fair was an election monitor in Afghanistan and she joins us with a look at how the United States will respond to the mounting evidence of electoral fraud.

Comment

President to Honor Slain Soldier

Thursday, September 17, 2009

Today President Obama will award a posthumous Medal of Honor to Sergeant First Class Jared Monti. The nation's highest military honor will be given to Monti for his bravery. He was killed in Afghanistan in 2006 when he ran into enemy fire three times trying to rescue an injured comrade. Zachary Barnes served as a medic with the 10th Mountain Division in Afghanistan. He knew and served with Sergeant First Class Monti.

Comments [3]

Sports: The Race for Baseball's Best

Thursday, September 17, 2009

The race for baseball's Most Valuable Player is heating up, especially in the American League, where at least four different players are vying for the award. In the National League, it's pretty much all about a man named Albert Pujols. Can anyone defeat this monster of a player? Our sports contributor, Ibrahim Abdul-Matin, gives us his take on the MVP races in baseball.

Comment

EU Attempts Bank Bonus Reform

Thursday, September 17, 2009

Bonuses for bankers aren't just a Wall Street problem. Nations from the European Union — mostly led by France — are hammering out an agreement on reforming structures for giving out bank bonuses. The G20 meetings will take place in Pittsburgh in just a few weeks; the E.U.'s goal is to reach an agreement before then... and they hope to get the United States on board, too. Louise Story, finance reporter for The New York Times, has the details.

Comment

Breaking Down the Baucus Bill

Thursday, September 17, 2009

Democratic Senator Max Baucus finally unveiled his plan for health care yesterday. No Republicans have endorsed the bill in its current form, but that doesn't mean they won't. We'll look at what's in a proposal that has been a year in the making and what may or may not be altered to win over moderate Republicans. We speak to Trudy Lieberman, Contributing Editor for the Columbia Journalism Review and healthcare blogger for CJR.org; and Dean Rosen, health care advisor to former Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist.

The brave, curious, or wanna-be-health-care-wonks can read the full text of the Finance Committee bill (1.2Mb PDF).

Want to hear what Sen. Baucus thinks of his bill? Watch the video below:

Comment

Cleveland's Plan to Fight Foreclosures

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

Cities across the U.S. are facing devastating rates of foreclosure. As the numbers of vacant houses increase, another problem has cropped up: banks don't want to keep all those foreclosed properties. In Ohio, Cleveland's Cuyahoga County expects at least 13,000 new foreclosures this year, but state Treasurer Jim Rokakis has a plan – he wants to buy up bad mortgages and sell them back to homeowners in order to keep people in their homes. We ask Rokakis about his plan and speak to Dan Moulthroup, reporter with WCPN in Cleveland, and the host of Sound of Ideas.

Comment

Behind the Spin: What Americans Want

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

Frank Luntz is a long-time Republican operative: a virtuoso of the focus group, a pollster extraordinaire and a master of message. In his latest book, "What Americans Really Want...Really: The Truth About Our Hopes, Dreams, and Fears," Luntz asks what ordinary Americans want – not from their government, but from life. And the results are a little surprising.

Comments [1]

It's Official: Flu Shots for Everyone

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

Yesterday, Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius announced that U.S. drug regulators have approved a vaccine against the H1N1 virus, commonly known as "swine flu." The U.S. government has purchased 195 million doses of the vaccine and plans to give them out for free to anyone who wants it.  We talk to an expert who says this is one of the largest medical initiatives in the history of influenza: Dr. Richard Wenzel, chairman of the Department of Internal Medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University.

In addition to free flu vaccines, the federal government is partnering with Elmo to help stop the spread of H1N1:

Comment

Admiral Mullen: More Troops Necessary in Afghanistan

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

Admiral Mike Mullen, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, testified before the Senate Armed Services Committee yesterday seeking a second term. Although he repeatedly said that no final decision has been made on future troop numbers in Afghanistan, he was clear that more troops and more time will be necessary in order for a successful military outcome. We speak to Thom Shanker, Pentagon correspondent for The New York Times.

Comment

Sports: Olympic Bids and Baseball's Playoff Push

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

As Chicago tries to drum up support for its bid to host the 2016 Olympic Games, Paddy O'Connell, host of the BBC radio program Broadcasting House, joins us with a look at the challenges London is facing as the host of the 2012 Olympics. Closer to home, Major League Baseball's season is winding down, and teams from both the American and National Leagues are vying for slots in the playoffs. The Takeaway's sports contributor Ibrahim Abdul-Matin gives us the lowdown on some of baseball's most exciting pennant races.

Comment

Health Care and the States

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

Most of the debate on health care reform has focused on the federal government and the individuals who might get new coverage. But today we ask a different question: what are individual states looking for from reform, and what are they worried about? We talk to Joy Johnson Wilson, director of health policy at the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Comment

House Votes to Reprimand Rep. Joe Wilson

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

With a roll call vote of 240-179 mainly along party lines, the House of Representatives yesterday passed a resolution of disapproval of Congressman Joe Wilson (R-South Carolina). Wilson yelled "you lie" in the midst of President Obama's address to Congress last week; the House reprimand said that Wilson had committed a “breach of decorum and degraded the proceedings of the joint session, to the discredit of the House.” One of the “yes” votes on that resolution came from Rep. Laura Richardson (D-California), who joins us this morning. (click through for a full interview transcript)

For a refresher on Wilson's outburst watch the start of the ruckus below:

Comments [1]

A Can-Do Way to Keep Fruit and Veg

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

For many of us, saying 'so long' to summer is not an easy thing. But there is one way to capture the sunny season in a bottle – or a jar, at least. With the abundance of wonderful fruits and vegetables that are bursting out of our gardens and farmers' markets, canning offers a way to eat summer tomatoes in the dead of winter. We speak to Takeaway food contributor Kathy Gunst, author of "Stonewall Kitchen Breakfast" and "Stonewall Kitchen Winter Celebrations." We also talk to John Forti, curator of historic landscapes at the Strawberry Banke Museum in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

Click through for a recipe for Kathy Gunst's roasted tomato sauce

Comment

Is Somalia the Next Afghanistan?

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

The small East African nation of Somalia is once again becoming a big problem for the United States, this time in the fight against terrorism and al-Qaida. There is enough fear that the nation is becoming a breeding ground for terrorists that the United States launched a preemptive strike yesterday. American troops landed in Somalia and attacked a group of Islamic militants. We're joined this morning by Nick Childs, defense and security correspondent for our partners, the BBC.

Comment

Next (Small) Steps for NASA

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

NASA has long been the government agency meant to lead the charge to the future, at least in the public's imagination. A report to Congress from an independent body of experts has put NASA's future into question. In a hearing before the U.S. House of Representative's commmittee on science and technology, the panel said the Constellation program, meant to replace the aging space shuttle fleet and drive human space exploration, was "fatally flawed." To explain the issues that the experts found, where the problems come from, and where NASA might go from here is The Takeaway's go-to space expert, Miles O'Brien.

Comments [1]