Streams

Todd Zwillich

Washington Correspondent, The Takeaway

Todd Zwillich appears in the following:

South Carolina and the Woe of Wilson

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

The House of Representatives passed a resolution Tuesday reprimanding South Carolina Congressman Joe Wilson for shouting "You lie!" to the president during his address to the joint session of Congress. While the congressman's outburst last week may not have been as loud as Kanye West's, it still shocked many, including Wilson’s wife, Roxanne. For a look into how the people of South Carolina are feeling about this episode as the repercussions drag on, we speak to Mark Quinn, host of South Carolina ETV and Radio’s public affairs program, The Big Picture.

Comment

A Team By Any Other Name

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

The regular baseball season is winding down, but the excitement for fans is far from over. Both the American and National League teams are making their big push for the playoffs and then (hopefully) a run at the World Series. The Takeaway's sports contributor Ibrahim Abdul-Matin gives us his picks for teams to watch.

Also on Ibrahim's agenda? For years, Native American groups have been trying to change the name of professional sports teams such as the Braves, the Cleveland Indians, and the Florida State Seminoles. Now, Native American activists are focusing on the Washington Redskins, and they are trying to take the case all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. Our very own sports contributor, Ibrahim Abdul-Matin, brings us up to speed.

Comments [3]

Changing Wall Street, One Regulation at a Time

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

Louise Story, finance reporter for The New York Times, joins us with a look at the changing banking regulatory regime in Washington. It's been a year since a complicated crisis of credit default swaps and failing banks threw the U.S. economy into a tailspin. Now Congress seems to want to crack down on the way Wall Street does business.

Comment

Unpacking the Health Care Debate

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

After over three months of bipartisan negotiations the U.S. Senate's Finance Committee is expected to unveil their much-anticipated plan for reforming the nations's health care system. The Finance committee has been working on the $880 billion proposal for months, but does not appear to have garnered any Republican backing despite the best efforts of the committee chair, Senator Max Baucus (D-Montana). Our own Todd Zwillich, long a denizen of Capitol Hill, and Time Magazine's Washington correspondent Jay Newton-Small talk us through the behind-the-scenes wrangling taking place in the halls of Congress.

Ever wonder how a bill becomes a law? Here's an explanation:

Comment

Union Yes! President Takes His Message to Workers

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

President Obama is traveling across the nation to rally people behind health care reform. One of this biggest stops happened yesterday, with a speech in Pittsburgh before hundreds of members of the AFL-CIO, the nation's largest labor union. The labor movement was one of now-President Obama's biggest supporters during his campaign. How does the group feel about the president, and his policies, eight months in? We talk with Cecil Roberts, the president of the United Mine Workers of America, and labor journalist Philip Dine about the current relationship between the president and workers.

If you missed the president's speech at the AFL-CIO convention, here it is:

Comment

Your Health Care Questions Answered

Tuesday, September 15, 2009

Yesterday, we asked listeners to send us questions about health care. From "insurance co-ops" to "sole proprietorship," our very own Washington correspondent and healthcare whiz Todd Zwillich addresses listeners' queries, conundrums, and confusion over health care reform.

Comment

Health Insurance Co-ops

Tuesday, September 15, 2009

This week, the Senate Finance committee is set to release the first draft of their health care bill. In fact, the proposed legislation was originally slated to be released today ... so what's holding things up? Here to explain the unfinished details is our own Washington correspondent, Todd Zwillich. Plus, this bill might contain plans for cooperative health insurance providers. Listeners asked us to explain what these companies look like, so we called up Peter Fallow, CEO of Group Healthcare Cooperative of Eau Claire, Wisconsin, and Timothy Jost, law professor and health policy expert.

Comments [1]

Answering Your Health Care Questions

Monday, September 14, 2009

Last week, President Obama addressed the nation before a joint session of Congress in an attempt to answer some questions and alleviate any doubts about his plan to overhaul the national health care system. Terms such as "co-ops," "public option," and "trigger option" are being thrown around, but not everyone understands what each of these terms mean.

To break it down for us is our Washington correspondent, Todd Zwillich, and Time Magazine Staff Writer Kate Pickert, who recently wrote a report including a glossary of health care debate terms.

Included in the report are the following definitions:

  • Health-Insurance Cooperative: Pools of people band together to collect premiums and pay health-care expenses without the help of the government or private insurance industry. These co-ops are nonprofit and owned and operated by members.
  • Health-Insurance Exchange: A government-administered marketplace or portal (via a website) where private or public insurance policies are sold.

 

Comment

Waiting on Washington: Health Care and Financial Regulation

Monday, September 14, 2009

Our Washington correspondent, Todd Zwillich, looks at the chances that Congress will reach an agreement on a health care bill this week. Then Louise Story, Wall Street and finance reporter for The New York Times, looks at what's next on Congress' agenda: reforming regulations on the financial sector.

Comment

Outbursts, Apologies and Incidentally, Health Care

Friday, September 11, 2009

The president laid out his plans for health care reform Wednesday night — or at least he tried to. He woke up Thursday morning to see that the headlines were stolen by an outburst from a little-known congressman from South Carolina. This morning we talk to our man on Capitol Hill, Todd Zwillich, and Jay Newton-Small, Washington reporter for Time Magazine, about apologies and how the latest uninsured numbers will shape the health care debate from here on out.

Comments [1]

Undecided Listeners React to President's Speech

Thursday, September 10, 2009

Last night President Obama used his bully pulpit to make a very specific pitch for health care reform before a joint session of Congress... and, incidentally, the watching American public. The Takeaway's Washington correspondent, Todd Zwillich, gives us the highlights. Before the speech, we spoke to some of our listeners who were unconvinced by the current state of the health care reform debate and the plans for reform promoted by Congress. Today, we check back in with Faith Dow of California, Brad Bynum in Oklahoma, and Troy Erickson from North Dakota, to see if the president won their support.

Comment

Electronic Footprints: What Your Messages Say about You

Thursday, September 10, 2009

Call it Big Brother or call it being a conscientious employer, but there's a new kind of software that monitors your use of email and online messaging: how many messages you send, how often, and when. It's called Cataphora and it also looks at instant messaging, word processors, and keycard use, to find out how useful an employee you are. We talk with Cataphora's CEO, Elizabeth Charnock, along with Takeaway contributor Beth Kobliner, author of Get a Financial Life: Personal Finance In Your Twenties and Thirties.

Comments [2]

Detroit Health Care Townhall

Thursday, September 10, 2009

Our Washington correspondent, Todd Zwillich, finds himself far outside the Beltway today. He is in Detroit after attending a townhall held last night on health care reform. While the crowd was mostly Democrats and supported President Obama, they had a lot of tough questions about health care reform.

Comment

President to Congress: Give Me the Dang Ball

Thursday, September 10, 2009

Last night in front of a rare joint session of Congress, President Obama addressed the issue that has been on everyone's minds: health care reform. His speech was to-the-point, tackling issues such as insurance reforms, pre-existing conditions, malpractice insurance reform, and calling to task members of Congress for their failure to move more quickly. The president seemed to endorse much of the latest draft of a health care reform bill, one being circulated by Sen. Max Baucus, but hinted that he may be willing to pass the bill without bi-partisan support. For more we talk to our Washington correspondent Todd Zwillich as well as David Herszenhorn, the congressional correspondent for the New York Times, who was live blogging the speech.

In case you missed the presidential address, here it is in its entirety:

Comment

Bill Keller on Rescued Reporter Stephen Farrell

Wednesday, September 09, 2009

This morning New York Times reporter Stephen Farrell was rescued by military commandos during a raid in Afghanistan. A British soldier and Farrell's translator, Sultan Munadi, were killed during the rescue. Farrell and his translator were kidnapped on Saturday by a group of Afghan fighters calling themselves the Taliban while reporting on a story in the northern province of Kunduz. The story was kept quiet out of concern that media attention would worsen the situation, so most did not know of the kidnapping. For more of the back story, we talk to New York Times Executive Editor Bill Keller.

Comment

One Year On: The Fall of Lehman Brothers

Wednesday, September 09, 2009

All week long we are reviewing the year that was: the year that marked the beginning of the financial meltdown and the recession that we continue to live through. Today we are focusing on the $600 billion collapse of Lehman Brothers — the largest bankruptcy filing in U.S. history. It’s a moment that many believe sent the global economy into crisis. To get a sense of the forces leading up to that day we speak with a Lehman Brothers’ insider, former vice president of distressed debt and convertible securities at Lehman Brothers, Lawrence McDonald. He's the author of the new book, A Colossal Failure of Common Sense: The Inside Story of the Collapse of Lehman Brothers.

We also talk to our contributor Louise Story, finance reporter for the New York Times, about the collapse of Lehmann and the ensuing global financial crisis. Louise also tells us about the new spate of corporate mergers that could indicate the nation's economy is making the slow turn towards recovery.

Comment

China Fights H1N1, One Politician at a Time

Wednesday, September 09, 2009

China will be the first country in the world to start a mass vaccination program to inoculate their citizens against the threat of H1N1, commonly known as "swine flu." Shirong Chen, the BBC's China editor, explains that China learned valuable lessons from their experience with the SARS virus. He also offers an explanation for why China has opted to first inoculate the politicians and the participants in the National Day Parade.

Comment

Supreme Court to Consider 'Hillary, the Movie'

Wednesday, September 09, 2009

A relatively innocuous (albeit negative) documentary on Hillary Clinton released during the 2008 election season may lead to something bigger than itself.  Today, the United States Supreme Court will return from its summer vacation to hear a case instigated by the film. It is, in fact, the second time the case has been brought before the nation's highest court, but this time it comes with greater weight: the potential to overturn campaign finance laws that have existed for the last 100 years. To take us from the film to the court case we are joined by Nate Persily, law professor at Columbia University; and Adam Liptak, Supreme Court correspondent for our partner the New York Times. 

For more, read Adam Liptak's article, Supreme Court to Revisit ‘Hillary’ Documentary, in the New York Times.

Check out some of the documentary, Hillary: The Movie or watch part one below:

Comment

Jay-Z's Place in Hip-Hop Canon

Wednesday, September 09, 2009

Forbes estimates that Shawn Carter, better known as Jay-Z and the man behind such classic hip-hop songs as "Dirt Off Your Shoulder" and "Hard Knock Life," rakes in about $82 million a year. Admittedly, a lot of that annual income stems from his former day job as CEO of Def Jam Records and as the owner of the New Jersey Nets. But! The world mostly knows Jay-Z as a rap star. (And maybe as Beyonce's husband.) David Wall Rice, avid hip-hop listener and professor of psychology at Morehouse College, joins us to put the "best rapper alive" into a broader context. (Read Rice's latest blog post, "Jay-Z Grows Us Up," about the new album.)

Comments [12]

The President Talks to Congress, America

Wednesday, September 09, 2009

Tonight, the president will appear before a joint session of Congress—perhaps the grandest setting for such an event—and deliver a speech on the need for health care reform. Among those watching will be Congressmen and Senators, but far beyond the halls of Congress, he will also be addressing Brad Bynum in Oklahoma and Faith Dow in California. As Americans who are still unconvinced on health care reform, they are who President Obama really needs to convince in his speech.

We also talk to New York Times White House correspondent Sheryl Gay Stolberg about what might be in the president's speech tonight.

Comments [6]