Streams

Thanassis Cambanis

middle east correspondent

Thanassis Cambanis appears in the following:

'House of Stone': A Memoir by the Late Anthony Shadid

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Less than two weeks ago, Anthony Shadid, a foreign correspondent for The New York Times, died in Syria from an acute asthma attack. Shadid covered nearly two decades of Middle East conflict, won the Pulitzer Prize twice, and authored three books. "House of Stone," his final book, goes on sale today. 

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The Latest from Egypt

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Thanassis Cambanis, professor at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs, author of A Privilege to Die: Inside Hezbollah's Legions and Their Endless War Against Israeland blogger on Egypt for The Atlantic, joins us to discuss the latest from the Egyptian elections. Then Jehane Noujaim, Egyptian-American filmmaker, talks about her work in Egypt and her recent detention by Egyptian security forces.

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Hosni Mubarak Trial Begins in Egypt

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak arrived by helicopter this morning at makeshift Cairo court built specifically for trying him on charges of corruption and ordering the deaths of 800 protesters. Mubarak, who ruled Egypt for nearly 30 years before stepping down after 18 days of protests, pleaded not guilty. The 83-year-old, who has been ill, was wheeled into a cage to face trial with his two sons and other defendants.

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Hezbollah Chooses Lebanon's New Prime Minister

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

Hezbollah, the Shiite military group based in Lebanon, has chosen the country's next prime minister, Najib Miqati. Reaction to the new prime minister is divided, with about half the country supporting Hezbollah, and the other half mounting protests backed by caretaker Prime Minister Saad al-Hariri. Miqati tells the BBC, "I'm a moderate guy, I'm a moderate politician."

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Inside Hezbollah

Monday, November 29, 2010

Veteran Middle East correspondent Thanassis Cambanis discusses the cross section of people that make up Hezbollah—part standing army, part political party, and part theological movement. A Privilege to Die: Inside Hezbollah's Legions and Their Endless War Against Israel looks at the organization and the people it includes, and Cambanis follows a few Hezbollah families through the 2006 war with Israel in order to get a fuller understanding of the ideological and religious roots of the conflict in the Middle East.

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