Streams

T.J. Raphael

Digital Content Editor of The Takeaway

T.J. Raphael appears in the following:

Rep. Tom McClintock: "Congress Should Prosecute James Clapper"

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

NSA officials are mulling a possible amnesty for leaker Edward Snowden. In exchange for the safe return of the rest of the documents he took from the NSA, Snowden could come back to the U.S. and avoid prosecution. The White House yesterday said that it opposes amnesty, while officials in the NSA are split. One supporter of an amnesty deal is Congressman Tom McClintock, a Republican representing California's Fourth District, who joins The Takeaway to discuss a possible deal.

Comment

Syrian Refugees Face Harsh Winter Weather

Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Early winter storms are hitting parts of the Middle East with snow and freezing temperatures. For Syrian refugees, the bitter cold is only exacerbating life in make shift homes and refugee camps. Dr. Hammam Akbik, a Syrian-American doctor who works with refugees, just returned from Jordan last week. He explains the short term challenges ahead for Syrian refugees and the aid workers trying to help them.

Comments [1]

Um, the Supervolcano Under Yellowstone is Way Bigger Than Previously Thought

Monday, December 16, 2013

Not 20 percent larger, or 50 percent larger, but a full two and a half times bigger than earlier estimates suggested.

Comments [1]

Glenn Greenwald: The U.S. Is Not Safer Since 9/11

Monday, December 16, 2013

“I think what we did made the threat much, much worse, and at the same time, destroyed many of the freedoms that we’ve all been taught define what the United States is all about,” says the investigative journalist.

Comments [32]

Forget Detroit, Puerto Rico Is In Big Trouble

Monday, December 16, 2013

Though Detroit seems to be in dire straights with its recent bankruptcy filing, there might actually be another piece of America that’s even worse off: Puerto Rico. The U.S. territory is facing massive debt, a potentially crippling bond ratings cut, a gaping hole in its massive pension fund, and a towering unemployment rate bolstered by federal entitlements. Ingrid Vila, chief of staff to Puerto Governor Alejandro Garcia Padilla, joins us to discuss Puerto Rico's options.

Comments [3]

Wheels of Justice Slowly Turning at Gitmo

Monday, December 16, 2013

As Americans prepare to head home for the Christmas and New Year's holidays, the families of the victims of the 9/11 attacks will be keeping a close eye on the wheels of justice, which are slowly turning down in Guantanamo Bay this holiday season. A second set of pre-trial hearings for five Guantanamo detainees charged in the 9/11 attacks will be held this week. Carol Rosenberg, reporter for the Miami Herald, joins The Takeaway to give a sense of what we can expect to see.

Comments [1]

Hollywood Legend Peter O'Toole Dead at 81

Monday, December 16, 2013

Peter O'Toole, the Hollywood legend who was made famous in his title role in Lawrence of Arabia, died on Saturday at the age of 81. He was born in Ireland and raised in England, but he came to be known around the globe. "Ireland, and the world, has lost one of the giants of film and theater," said Irish President Michael Higgins. O'Toole's acting career began on stage in England as a teenager, later moving on to television roles in the 1950s and then the big screen. Today The Takeaway remembers Peter O'Toole.

Comments [1]

Ex-FBI Agent That Disappeared in Iran Actually on Rogue CIA Mission

Friday, December 13, 2013

More than 6 years ago, Robert Levinson, a former FBI agent, disappeared in Iran. He has been presumed to be a hostage of some kind, a designation that the U.S. government has not taken issue with. But now it turns out that Levinson may actually be a casualty of a CIA operation gone wrong. Tim Weiner is a former reporter for our partner The New York Times and author of "Legacy of Ashes: The History of the CIA" and "Enemies: The History of the FBI." He joins The Takeaway to discuss Levinson's case.

Comments [2]

Kim Jong Un Executes Uncle, Nation's Defacto No. 2

Friday, December 13, 2013

Dictator Kim Jung Un has executed his uncle, Jang Song Thaek—formerly the country's de facto No. 2 official. Earlier this week Kim Jong Un purged his uncle as an adviser and had him literally dragged out of a political meeting by military police. Yesterday the nation announced that he has been tried, convicted and executed for treason. Joining The Takeaway to explain what this decision means is Sokeel Park, Director of Research for Liberty in North Korea, an NGO working with refugees from North Korea.

Comments [1]

The Speaker of the House is Fed Up

Friday, December 13, 2013

What has gotten into John Boehner? The normally pliant Speaker looks like he has had enough of rigid Tea Party conditions and attitudes. He fears that these newest members of Congress, and the organizations that back them, are taking the GOP brand over the deep end—and he's fed up with it. Todd Zwillich, The Takeaway's D.C. Correspondent, helps us understand the sudden shift in Speaker Boehner's perspective.

Comments [1]

South Dakota Pleads for Farm Bill Extension

Friday, December 13, 2013

In October, an early blizzard killed tens of thousands of cattle in South Dakota and Nebraska. Ordinarily after this kind of turmoil farmers can expect disaster relief funding through the Farm Bill—but this year that relief is in limbo. Joining The Takeaway to discuss the importance of the Farm Bill is Gary Cammack, a South Dakota Republican state representative and a rancher who lost more than 100 of his own cows and calves in the storm. 

Comment

New Movie Releases: 'Saving Mister Banks' and 'The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug'

Friday, December 13, 2013

We’re well into December, which means that the Oscar contenders are taking over the theaters. Our Movie Date team is here to talk about two of those contenders today: The second installment in “The Hobbit” series called “The Desolation of Smaug,” and “Saving Mister Banks,” starring Emma Thompson and Tom Hanks. In addition to hosting the movie date podcast, Rafer Guzman is film critic for Newsday and Kristen Meinzer is culture producer for The Takeaway.

Comment

Gun Sales on the Rise a Year After Newtown

Friday, December 13, 2013

Tomorrow marks the one-year anniversary of the Newtown, Connecticut shooting spree at Sandy Hook Elementary. The desire to prevent a tragedy of this scope from ever taking place again is one shared by many Americans. But a year later gun laws are no stricter, and gun sales are on the rise. Robert Draper, contributing writer to The New York Times Magazine, writes about the legislative battle over gun control in this week's magazine.

Comments [2]

Seeking Kindness in the Wake of Sandy Hook

Friday, December 13, 2013

Families of those killed in the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre are asking people to mark the one year anniversary with acts of kindness. Today the Takeaway is joined by Colin Goddard, a survivor of the 2007 Virginia Tech shooting, and Megan Sullivan, sister of Alex Sullivan, a victim of the Aurora movie theater shooting. Together they discuss what kind of closure kindness can offer in the face of a severe trauma like a mass shooting.

Comments [3]

After Sandy Hook, Grade Schools Prioritize Safety

Friday, December 13, 2013

One of the things that ran through many of our minds after the tragedy of Sandy Hook was, "How could this happen—at an elementary school?" Now school doors have been locked. Shades have been drawn. Teachers are now equal parts protectors and educators. Joining The Takeaway to talk about the changing sense of safety and shelter in elementary schools is Lindsay Gerakaris, a fourth grade teacher at P.S. 124 in New York City.

Comments [3]

U.S. Cuts Off Non-Lethal Aid to Syrian Rebels

Thursday, December 12, 2013

The U.S. has long supported the effort that encourages the ouster of Syria's President Bashar al-Assad from power. Yesterday, the Obama administration announced that it would stop sending nonlethal aid—like food and medical supplies—to the moderate opposition in Syria, at least temporarily. Andrew Tabler, a senior fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy and author of "In The Lion's Den: An Eyewitness account of Washington's Battle with Syria," joins The Takeaway to discuss these latest developments.

Comment

Treating The Injured in the Wake of Typhoon Haiyan

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Typhoon Haiyan ravaged the Philippines last month, killing nearly 6,000 people and injuring more than 26,000. In the aftermath of the crisis, relief workers headed to the region to try and help millions of people affected by the storm. Dr. Selwyn Mahon, a disaster medicine fellow at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, reflects on his experience in the devastated city of Tacloban.

Comment

Digital Volunteers Map Destruction in the Philippines

Thursday, December 12, 2013

New crowdsourcing technologies are bringing humanitarian relief work to anyone with an internet connection. Hundreds of volunteers use the latest satellite photos, news reports, and easy opensource technology to update maps of disaster-affected areas with information about damaged roads and buildings. Dale Kunce is the senior geospatial engineer at the American Red Cross. He joins The Takeaway to explain how a legion of volunteer techies around the world helped with the typhoon relief process in the Philippines.

Comment

Desperately Seeking a Cure for Alzheimer's

Thursday, December 12, 2013

More than 5 million Americans suffer with Alzheimer’s disease and by 2050 that number is expected to nearly triple. All this week, our partner WGBH has been exploring efforts by leading researchers in labs around the country who are trying to find better treatments and ultimately a cure for Alzheimer's disease. The Takeaway talks with WGBH and WCAI senior reporter and editor, Sean Corcoran about his series: "Desperate for a Cure: The Search for New Alzheimer's Treatments."    

Comments [2]

Long-Term Unemployment Difficult to Change

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Long-term joblessness is up 213 percent, and some 1.3 million Americans are likely to see their unemployment benefits end this month—Congress has so far failed to include an extension to those benefits in any budget deal. Joining The Takeaway to weigh in on the state of unemployment in the U.S. is Cecilia Rouse, Dean of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University and a former member of President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers.

Comments [1]