Streams

T.J. Raphael

Digital Content Editor of The Takeaway

T.J. Raphael appears in the following:

Symbiotic Relationships & The Circle of Life

Thursday, August 22, 2013

When studying nature, we often focus on predatory relationships. But there are other kinds of relationships in nature as well. Some, like the suckerfish and shark, fall under the category of commensalism. Others, like coral and algae, are built on mutualism, or symbiosis. Katie McKissick, also known as “Beatrice the Biologist” online, explains.

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Are Bob Filner's Days in Office as San Diego Mayor Numbered?

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Last month, Bob Filner was accused of inappropriate conduct by 16 women. After intense public scrutiny, the democratic mayor of San Diego enrolled in two weeks of intensive behavioral therapy, which ended on August 10th. Sandhya Dirks, has been covering the Filner story for KPBS News in San Diego. She joins The Takeaway to discuss what the next steps for Filner may be.

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Fukushima Nuclear Plant Crisis Worsens

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Storage tanks at  the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant are leaking about 80,000 gallons of contaminated water. Bob Hernan, author of “This Borrowed Earth: Lessons from the 15 Worst Environmental Disasters Around the World”, explains how serious the leak is.

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Shooting Victim Speaks Out on Stop-And-Frisk

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

There's really no reason why young Brian Beutler is alive today. He was shot three times on a poorly lit street in Northwest Washington D.C. five years ago by two young black men who tried to steal his cell phone. In D.C., there is no stop-and-frisk policy. What he believes about the value of stop-and-frisk, and profiling, might just surprise you.

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After VRA Ruling, Florida Looks to Make Sweeping Changes Without Oversight

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

This week, we're looking at how the decision has already started to change voting laws across the United States. Today we look at Florida. Up until the Shelby County decision, five counties had to ask the Justice Department for permission before changing their voting laws. Gina Jordan, reporter for WLRN in Miami, says the state is now making sweeping changes without federal oversight.

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Opposition in Syria Claim Chemical Attacks Killed Hundreds

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Syrian opposition activists have accused the Syrian government of launching chemical weapons attacks and killing hundreds in areas close to the capital of Damascus overnight. The Syrian government has denied that chemical weapons were used earlier today. Ben Hubbard, Middle East correspondent for our partner The New York Times, discusses the latest details with us. 

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NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg's Legacy

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

New York City will soon be electing a new mayor, but the city's current mayor, Michael Bloomberg, has left an indelible mark on the nation’s largest city. After 12 years and three terms, he will move on in January 2014. Brian Lehrer, host of WNYC’s Brian Lehrer show, discusses Mayor Bloomberg's legacy. 

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Texas & The Voting Rights Act

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

This week The Takeaway is taking you on a tour of states that have started to change their laws since the Supreme Court found parts of the Voting Rights Act unconstitutional. Texas wasted no time changing its laws in the wake of the Court's ruling. Kate McGee is a reporter at KUT in Austin. She says that the battle over redistricting in Texas began years before the Supreme Court's.

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The RNC Versus CNN and NBC

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

The Republican National Committee voted unanimously last Friday to pull their partnership with CNN and NBC due to the networks' planned films focusing on Hillary Rodham Clinton. Kathleen Hall Jamieson explains the decision, and how it could affect the upcoming presidential election. Jamieson is the Director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Ex-Pakistani President Faces Murder Charges

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

Former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf has been indicted for the murder of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, who was assassinated in 2007. Joining us to discuss this is Akbar Ahmed, chair of Islamic studies at American University and Pakistan's former ambassador to the United Kingdom. Ahmed is author of the book "The Thistle and the Drone."

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New York City's Biggest Gun Bust

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

The city of New York hit a new record—yesterday 254 guns were seized, and 19 alleged smugglers were charged in what's seen as the city’s largest gun bust yet. Daniel Webster is Director of Johns Hopkins’ Center for Gun Policy and Research. He joins us to discuss what policy makers can do to curb the trafficking of firearms.

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Every Taco Tells a Story

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

Tacos predate the arrival of Europeans in North America, and over the centuries, they’ve evolved from a Mexican food staple to one of America’s greatest fusion cuisines. This week, Fronteras is airing a five-part series on the mighty taco. Kicking it off and giving a sneak peak to the Takeaway is David Martin Davies, a lifelong taco lover and news director of Texas Public Radio in San Antonio.

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Violent Confrontations Continue in Egypt

Monday, August 19, 2013

Within the last 24 hours in Egypt, a police convoy was targeted by militants in the Northern Sinai desert and at least two dozen police were killed. Charles Sennott is the vice president and editor-at-large of the Global Post. He joins The Takeaway to discuss what has transpired in the region since the Arab Spring that has enabled such violence to take root.

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New Report Shows More Oversteps By NSA

Monday, August 19, 2013

According to documents provided by Edward Snowden to the Washington Post's Barton Gellman, the NSA has overstepped its legal authority thousands of times since 2008. Gellman joins The Takeaway to discuss the latest NSA revelations, and the consequences for the Obama Administration and American citizens. Glenn Greenwald, The Guardian reporter who published Edward Snowden's leaks, found that his domestic partner was held for nearly nine hours under British anti-terror legislation at Heathrow airport on Sunday. David Anderson is the U.K's Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation. He joins the program to discuss British anti-terror laws and why Miranda was held.

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One Year Later, Undocumented Youth Program a Success

Monday, August 19, 2013

While Congress may be unable to pass the DREAM Act, or immigration reform, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program has been quite successful. Hareth Andrade discusses her experience with the program and what it means to the undocumented youth community. 23 year-old Hina Naveed is Pakistani. Here family moved here from Dubai in 2001. She shares her DACA experience as well.

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Experiments With a Tech-Free Summer Camp

Monday, August 19, 2013

Technology isn't stopping one Pennsylvania summer camp from trying to get kids to connect more deeply with nature and one another. The camp decided to conduct an experiment by letting its campers use gadgets as much as they wanted after the devices were away from the campers a period of time. Manoush Zomorodi, of WNYC's New Tech City, has followed the progress of this camp from initial withdrawal to the lessons learned after.

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Philadelphia Schools to Open On Schedule Despite Financial Woes

Monday, August 19, 2013

Until recently, it was unclear whether the Philadelphia school system would be able to open its doors in September. The superintendent of Philadelphia city schools said he would need $50 million to meet the minimum staff requirements needed to safely operate schools. Education reporter for our partner WHYY in Philadelphia, Kevin McCorry, joins The Takeaway to explain the school's financial crisis and how the city got there. 

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The History of the Voting Rights Act: The Origins of the Preclearance Provision

Monday, August 19, 2013

Gary May is the author of "Bending Toward Justice: The Voting Rights Act and the Transformation of American Democracy." In his book, he explores the origins of the Voting Rights Act and answers the question: Why wasn't the preclearance test applied to all states and localities in the U.S. rather than the selective ones of the Voting Rights Act?

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Can There Be a Peaceful Path Forward for Egypt?

Friday, August 16, 2013

Once more, Egypt is left to reckon with a deposed ruler, an unsettled populace, and now a shocking onslaught of violence that has left scores dead and many more wounded. Hugh Roberts is an Edward Keller professor of North African and Middle Eastern history at Tufts University, and the former director of the International Crisis Group’s North Africa Project. He joins us to discuss whether the country can recover from this level of conflict.

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NASA's Kepler Spacecraft Will Never Search for Planets Again

Friday, August 16, 2013

According to NASA, the Kepler Spacecraft a has identified and calculated the movements of more than 3,500 possible planets, but its search is over due to a malfunction. Matthew Holman is a Smithsonian Astrophysicist and lecturer at Harvard University. He was also a part of the Kepler team. He joins The Takeaway discuss Kepler and whether it will ever search the stars again.

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