Streams

T.J. Raphael

Digital Content Editor of The Takeaway

T.J. Raphael appears in the following:

News Quiz | Week of February 21

Friday, February 21, 2014

Are you a newsie? Do you know what's happening from Washington to Hollywood to Pyongyang? Are you one of those people who always need to know? Do you listen to the news religiously, convinced that what you hear will give you an edge? Be smarter than your pals. Prep your dinner party factoids. Gauge your knowledge about what happened this week, as heard on The Takeaway.

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Violence & Political Unrest Continues to Erupt in Ukraine

Friday, February 21, 2014

For the past few days, live video from Kiev's Independence Square has been streaming in real time, giving people around the world a first-hand glimpse at the scope and scale of the protests.

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Rosanne Cash on Seeking Inspiration

Friday, February 21, 2014

Rosanne Cash just released her first new album in four years, called "The River and the Thread." Seeking the inspiration for truly great songwriting, beyond Grammy's, pop hits and genre classics, has been a lifelong journey for Cash. The inspiration for her latest album came from a trip back to the South, which put her back in touch with her roots. Rosanne Cash discusses the process she went through to breathe life into her new music—and what she learned about herself along the way.

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The Most Memorable Olympic Heroes of All Time

Thursday, February 20, 2014

Back during the time of the ancient Greeks, the word "hero" was used in a very different way. For the ancient Greeks, it didn’t just describe someone who was victorious or noble. It also described people who stood out for unexpected acts—sometimes problematic ones too. Even today, what’s heroic at the Olympics isn’t sheer mettle or technique. David Wallechinsky, president of the International Society of Olympic Historians, has seen more than a few Olympic heroes in his years of watching the games.

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Kiev, a City Long Besieged Continues to Seethe

Thursday, February 20, 2014

At the center of the feud between protesters and the government, between Ukraine and the West, is Kiev—a city long steeped in political turmoil and significance.

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Young, Rich and Working on Wall Street

Thursday, February 20, 2014

Wall Street is a place that's hard to make your way into and even harder to find your way out of. Kevin Roose recently sneaked his way into a black tie Kappa Beta Phi event and wrote about this experience for New York magazine. He found that young inductees to Wall Street are entering a very different environment today than a decade ago. He explores this new generation of Wall Streeters, and the culture of fear and extravagance that accompanies the job.

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Today's Highlights | February 20, 2014

Thursday, February 20, 2014

Also on Today's Show: Since the foreclosure crisis, a growing number of specialty firms known as servicers have emerged...Could student loan debt be having adverse affects on the housing market? Housing experts say that fewer young people are buying homes and even for those who are trying, they are having a hard time getting loans...The men's hockey semifinals begin this weekend in Sochi, and the United States will face off against Canada, Sweden and Finland. As the world’s greatest players take to the ice, what chance does the U.S. stand?

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Union Radio Fades from the Airwaves

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

During the heyday of American unions, there were more than 250 programs produced or funded by labor unions. Elizabeth Fones-Wolf, history professor at West Virginia University and author of “Waves of Opposition: Labor and the Struggle for Democratic Radio, 1933-1958,” explains the history of a now lesser-known news source. The Union Edge is the only nationally syndicated labor program remaining. Its co-host and executive producer, Angela Baughman, explains how these newscasts have evolved.

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Today's Highlights | February 19, 2014

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Also on Today's Show: A new report out by the Congressional Budget Office shows that increasing the federal minimum wage would mean an increase in family income but also the elimination of some low-wage jobs...The top five in the world sounds pretty impressive everywhere from academics, to wealth or life expectancy. It's impressive everywhere except the Olympics. What is it like for an Olympic athlete to finish in fourth place?

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Kiev Burns as Protests in Ukraine turn Deadly

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Kiev is smoldering after a night of violent fighting between government forces and protesters. Dozens are dead and hundreds are injured in Ukraine's capitol city. Zenon Zawada, political analyst at Concord Capital investment bank and writer for The Ukrainian Weekly, is in Kiev and was at the protests last night. He gives us an update on the situation on the ground. John Herbst, former Ambassador to the Ukraine, weighs in on what the violence means for the future of Ukraine.

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Sir Ian McKellen Discusses Life on Stage & Screen

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Sir Ian McKellen stopped by The Greene Space at WNYC yesterday for a live lunchtime chat with a studio audience and our host John Hockenberry. He discussed his life and work in theater and on screen, from the Broadway stage play "Waiting for Godot," to X-Men and his friendship with Sir Patrick Stewart. Here you'll find selected audio and video clips of McKellen's interview, as well as a link to the full conversation.

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Why Your Late 30s Are the Best Time for Breakthroughs

Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Albert Einstein once said that "a person who has not made his great contribution to science before the age of 30 will never do so." Genius may have come early for Einstein, but according to a new study from the National Bureau of Economic Research, most scientists don't achieve their first big breakthrough until their late thirties. David Shenk, author of "The Genius in All of Us: New Insights Into Genetics, Talent, and IQ," discusses the study and its implications.

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Today's Highlights | February 18, 2014

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Also on Today's Show: Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro ordered the expulsion of three U.S. consular officials whom he accused of conspiracy and meeting students involved in anti-government protests. In a speech broadcast on national TV, President Maduro warned that there would be a more armed response...Yesterday at the Sochi Olympics, Meryl Davis and Charlie White won America's first ever gold medal in ice dancing. The Takeaway explains why America fell off the map in ice dancing. 

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Will the Pope Change his Mind on Divorce?

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

For 500 years, the Catholic Church denied communion to parishioners who divorce and remarry. But this week, Pope Francis may chart a new course, breaking ranks with his predecessor, Pope Benedict XVI, who refused to allow for pastoral discretion on the issue. James Carroll is the author of "An American Requiem: God, My Father, and the War that Came Between Us" and "Toward A New Catholic Church: The Promise of Reform." He examines the choices facing Pope Francis regarding marriage and the future of the Catholic Church. 

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Reimagining the Politics of Evangelical Christians

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

After generations of Evangelical Christians moving further towards the right, many found that their partisan politics were pushing people away. Now, a new generation of young leaders are calling for change and more moderation. Brandan Robertson, founder of The Revangelical Movement, an organization that promotes an alternative Evangelical perspective and Krista Tippett, host of On Being, join us to discuss the changing face of Evangelicals. 

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Talks Resume on Iran Nuclear Deal

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Talks have resumed in Vienna between Iran and six world powers to try and cement a nuclear deal. Iran's foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif, has insisted that Iran has the political will to reach a deal. Such optimism contrasts with remarks from Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, who has poured cold water on these talks and said they would likely fail to deliver an agreement. Thomas Erdbrink, Tehran Bureau Chief for our partner The New York Times, weighs in on whether or not a deal can be reached.

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How "Network" Predicted Today's Media Culture

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

"Network," the 1976 film directed by Sidney Lumet, won four Academy Awards that year. But almost 40 years later, more significant than any of its accolades is the lasting statement the film made about the television industry—it seems to have seen into the future of our media culture. Dave Itzkoff, culture reporter for our partner The New York Times, is author of a new book on the classic film. It's called “Mad As Hell: The Making of Network and the Fateful Vision of the Angriest Man in Movies.”  

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A Nail in the Coffin for Organized Labor?

Monday, February 17, 2014

In Tennessee, a vote was held over the weekend that many believe could be a nail in the coffin for organized labor. Workers at Volkswagen’s Chattanooga plant voted against joining the United Auto Workers union—the move was opposed every step of the way by the state's governor and other members of the GOP. Kristin Dziczek, director of the Industry & Labor Group at the Center for Automotive Research, joins The Takeaway to describe why this vote caused such a fight. Andy Berke, the Mayor of Chattanooga, also weighs in.

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'Crimes Against Humanity' Rampant in North Korea

Monday, February 17, 2014

Urgent action is needed by the international community to address wide-ranging "crimes against humanity" in North Korea, a scathing 400-page report released today by the United Nations (U.N.) has found. The U.N.'s Commission of Inquiry on Human Rights in North Korea details "unspeakable atrocities" committed in the country and a wide array of "crimes against humanity" that arise from "policies established at the highest level of State." Michael Kirby, Chair of the Commission of Inquiry on Human Rights, joins The Takeaway to explain the Commission's findings.

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Today's Highlights | February 17, 2014

Monday, February 17, 2014

Also on Today's Show: Over the weekend, Olympians broke records and broke down. Mary Pilon, sports reporter for our partner The New York Times, is on site at the Sochi Games and fills us in on the highs and lows. The Takeaway's Olympic series, "How Do They Do That?," continues. Resident Olympic Physicist Eric Goff, and Curt Schreiner, a three-time Olympian and director of the Saratoga Biathlon Club, gives us the ins and outs of the grueling sport.

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