Streams

T.J. Raphael

Digital Content Editor of The Takeaway

T.J. Raphael appears in the following:

Tennessee: The Innovation State?

Thursday, February 06, 2014

Could Tennessee be a model of future innovation and thinking? We explore how the state is revolutionizing both education and technology. From Chattanooga, Mayor Andy Berke, and Drew Belz, co-founder of Fancy Rhino, a creative agency, talk about the city's success in creating the fastest city wide internet in the country. And Dr. Janice Gilliam, president of Northeast State Community College, weighs in on the state's proposal to make community college and technical schools free for all Tennessee students.

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Is the Tobacco Lobby Losing its Grip?

Thursday, February 06, 2014

The biggest drug store in the country, CVS, announced this week that it plans to stop selling cigarettes in all of its stores across the country. What does this move mean for the tobacco industry? Are we witnessing the end of cigarette companies as we know them—or does this just signal a change in the market as we know it? Stanton Glantz, medical professor at the University of California, San Francisco, has been following the movements of the tobacco industry for years, and thinks CVS's decision is a significant one. 

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CVS Quits Cigarettes

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

The drugstore chain will stop selling cigarettes and all tobacco products at its more than 7,600 stores nationwide by October 1, 2014.

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Will True Democracy Ever Come to Egypt?

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Three years ago this month, protests in Cairo’s Tahrir Square reached a fever pitch—and the voice of the people was heard. But in the months and years since, Egypt’s future remains in limbo. At the end of January, news that interim military leader General Abdul-Fattah el-Sisi planned to run for the presidency left much of the world wondering if true democracy will ever have a place in Egypt. It's a question Jehane Noujaim and Karim Amer, the director and producer of the Oscar-nominated documentary  “The Square,” have grappled with.

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Turns Out Humans Only Feel Four Basic Emotions

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Conventional scientific understanding holds that there are only six classic emotions: Happy, surprised, afraid, disgusted, angry, and sad. That is until now. A new study finds that, in fact, we don't even have six emotions—but only four "basic" emotions: Happy, sad, afraid/surprised, and angry/disgusted. Dr. Rachael Jack of the Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology at the University of Glasgow, is one of the scientists behind this new finding. She joins The Takeaway to explain how we categorize emotions.

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Today's Highlights | February 5, 2014

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Other Highlights From Today's Show: Protests continue in Kiev, with opposition groups demanding changes to the Ukrainian constitution to limit the president’s powers. As MPs negotiate for the change, we look at the possible outcome of the upheaval...The March Against Fear aimed to unify and solidify the civil rights movement by marching from Memphis Tennessee to Jackson Mississippi. What actually happened, starting with the near fatal shooting of James Meredith, started a conversation among black activists.

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Keystone XL Pipeline: The Local Perspective

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Over the last few months, the Keystone XL pipeline has become a national controversy. While environmental groups protest the pipeline's expansion from Cushing, Oklahoma to Alberta, Canada, Congressional Republicans are pushing for the Obama Administration's approval. With the national debate in the headlines, The Takeaway hears from three reporters to examine the impact of the proposed pipeline. Mose Buchele, a state impact reporter for KUT in Austin, Texas; Katie Schubert, news director for KIOS Omaha, and Joe Wertz, a state impact reporter in Norman, Oklahoma, weigh in.

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In Search of a Stolen Stradivarius

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Earlier this week, Milwaukee concertmaster Frank Almond was walking to a car after a performance when his 1715 Stradivarius violin was stolen by a thief. A former FBI special agent discussed the world of high art theft and the history of stolen violins.

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Tea Party & House GOP Battle Over Immigration

Tuesday, February 04, 2014

The power of the Tea Party continues to divide and fracture House Republicans. House Speaker John Boehner has decided to stand strong and push forward with immigration reform, but the Tea Party has made it clear they will fight back against legislation. What is on the table for immigration reform this time around? And what is at the heart of the GOP split? For answers, we go to Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich.

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We're Having Another Heroin Epidemic

Tuesday, February 04, 2014

Some researchers are tying the rise in heroin use to tighter restrictions on prescription opiates like Oxycotin and Vicodin.

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Digital Divide Remains As Domains Enter New Era

Tuesday, February 04, 2014

About 1,000 new generic top-level domain names—the last bit of an internet address, such as the .org in TheTakeaway.org—are coming into existence. Cyrus Namazi, vice president of Domain Name System Services at ICANN, and Michael Froomkin, professor of law at the University of Miami, explain why the web is getting a new look. As the select few scramble to buy up new domains, many are left without any Internet access entirely. Michael Liimatta, co-founder and president of Connecting for Good, provides a snapshot of the digital divide.

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Syria: A Diplomatic Dance & the Music of War

Tuesday, February 04, 2014

Is America's approach to Syria failing? Nancy Soderberg, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, discusses Syria's future and the Obama administration's agenda. Each morning, Syrian composer Kinan Azmeh asks himself if everything is all right—he asks this of himself, his family and his friends. Yet sometimes there is no answer to that question, as his piece "A Sad Morning Every Morning" shows. He joins The Takeaway to discuss the relationship between war and music.

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The Takeaway Remembers Philip Seymour Hoffman

Monday, February 03, 2014

Philip Seymour Hoffman, called one of the most ambitious and widely admired U.S. actor of his generation, died yesterday in a Manhattan apartment at the age of 46. Hoffman struggled with substance abuse throughout his career, yet on the screen and off the screen he always kept audiences and critics coming back. Most knew Hoffman from his memorable acting roles in "Boogie Nights," "Almost Famous," "The Big Lebowski," and of course, "Capote," for which he earned an Academy Award. Today The Takeaway remembers Philip Seymour Hoffman.

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Pay-for-Play: Should College Athletes Be Unionized?

Monday, February 03, 2014

A group of football players at Northwestern University are attempting to organize and join a labor union. It’s the latest move in the complicated relationship between the NCAA and its athletes, some of whom believe they should be payed and protected as workers. Joe Nocera, columnist for our partner The New York Times, says these student athletes should be able to form a union. Former NCAA athlete Ibrahim Abdul-Matin agrees. Ibrahim is a former linebacker at the University of Rhode Island and an NCAA scholar-athlete.

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The Military's Encyclopedia of Ethical Failures

Monday, February 03, 2014

"The Encyclopedia of Ethical Failures" sounds like a whimsical title for a high-brow novel, but it is actually a very real bureaucratic laundry list of the wrong-doings of government employees. The infractions are sometimes pathetic, sometimes serious, and sometimes laughable—but they are true through and through, and they are extensive Gordon Lubold, a national security reporter for Foreign Policy has studied the encyclopedia at length. He walks us through the highlights of this report—from the funniest violations to the most egregious.

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Boston Mayor on Marathon Bomber, City's Future

Monday, February 03, 2014

Though much remains to be seen, the leadership of Boston's new leader, Mayor Marty Walsh,  has already been tested in the few weeks since he took office. As he settles into his new role, one of his biggest challenges will be leading the city back towards a place of security and safety following last year's marathon bombings, and focusing on issues of unemployment and under-achieving schools that continue to plague many of the city's neighborhoods. He discusses the challenges he'll face in reuniting the city.

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Punishing Drought Threatens California

Monday, February 03, 2014

A sandy drought has swept across California and is now threatening the state’s drinking water supply. The drips are coming to an end and people have been given notice all over the state to expect their supplies to be turned off soon. The main municipal water distribution system has announced it doesn't have enough water to supplement local supplies—so for the first time in history the spigot is being turned off. Dan Macon owns the Flying Mule Farm in Auburn, CA joins The Takeaway to discuss this punishing drought. 

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Excitement, Caution Surround Winter Olympics

Monday, February 03, 2014

The Winter Olympics are just four days away, and over the weekend thousands of excited athletes packed up their bags, skates, and skis, and boarded a plane for Sochi. Olympic optimism aside, much of the hype surrounding the games has been overshadowed by the threat of terrorist attacks, a fear that was amplified following the twin suicide bombings in late December that killed 34 people in the city of Volgograd. Joining The Takeaway from the ground in Moscow is Andrei Soldatov, investigative journalist and security expert.

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News Quiz: How Well Did You Listen This Week?

Friday, January 31, 2014

Are you a newsie? Do you know what's happening from Washington to Hollywood? Are you one of those people who always need to know? Do you watch or listen to the news religiously, convinced that what you hear will give you an edge? Be smarter than your pals. Prep your dinner party factoids. Gauge your knowledge about what happened this week, as heard on The Takeaway.

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An Inside Look at Death Penalty Decisions

Friday, January 31, 2014

Yesterday the Justice Department announced that it will pursue capital punishment for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the man accused of plotting and executing the Boston Marathon bombings. Should Tsarvaev be ultimately sentenced to death? It would mark the most significant death penalty case since Timothy McVeigh, the man behind the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing. Vicki Behenna, a former assistant U.S. attorney for Oklahoma, helped prosecute Timothy McVeigh. She joins The Takeaway to explain how the federal government pursues the death penalty.

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