Streams

T.J. Raphael

Digital Content Editor of The Takeaway

T.J. Raphael appears in the following:

Takeaway To Do List: Obama's State of The Union

Monday, January 27, 2014

In advance of the State of the Union on Tuesday, we're creating a Takeaway to do list called "SOTU To Do,"—and we need your help. What should be on Obama's to do list? Tweet us @TheTakeaway using #SOTUToDo and we'll make our own, listener-sponsored to do list for the president. But first, Takeaway Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich examines the topics President Barack Obama will likely cover on Tuesday.

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Are E-Cigarettes Making it Cool to Smoke Again?

Monday, January 27, 2014

"The marketing of it is of particular concern because not only is it glamorizing and in some ways sexualizing e-cigarettes, there is a concern that it is going to renormalizing smoking," says Michael Eriksen, former director of the CDC's Office on Smoking and Health.

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How to Take the Plunge & Do What You Love

Monday, January 27, 2014

Last week, we discussed this piece of common advice given to young people: "Do what you love." It sounds very simple: Follow your passion, and the money will follow. But is that always the case? Our conversation about following your dreams sparked a lot of discussion. To explore this issue in greater depth, The Takeaway hears from Jey Born and his wife Betsy Thorleifson. Together they discuss how they are making a team effort as a couple to do what they love.

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Who Really Gets to Do What They Love?

Friday, January 24, 2014

It's become popular to insist that the key to a successful career is to simply "follow your bliss" straight into a profession that you're truly passionate about. For most people, is it really practical to do what you love? And if it's not, why are we giving this advice to our young people? Miya Tokumitsu, holds a Ph.D in art history. Her recent essay in Jacobin magazine breaks down why being told to "do what you love" isn't necessarily sound advice.

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Today's Highlights | January 24, 2013

Friday, January 24, 2014

Other Highlights From Today's Show: Governor Jerry Brown has declared a drought emergency for the state of California. What does this mean for cities like San Diego?...Our Movie Date team reviews this week's big release and gives their top picks for this year’s Sundance Film Festival ...The World Economic Forum will devote all of today to panels and talks on the threat of climate change. Is this a sign of things to come?

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Video Game Music Gains Recognition

Friday, January 24, 2014

A growing group of scholars from around the world have begun studying songs in video games. These so-called “ludomusicologists” had their first North American conference last weekend, in hopes of legitimizing this type of music in the academic world. Steven Reale, assistant professor of music at Youngstown State University, shares why this form of musical composition and new field of study is gaining recognition world-wide.

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The Clinton Machine Gears Up for 2016

Friday, January 24, 2014

Hillary Clinton has yet to declare her candidacy for the 2016 presidential race, but the Clinton machine is well-oiled and ready for action. Amy Chozick, reporter for Takeaway partner The New York Times, is the author of "Planet Hillary," the cover story in this week's New York Times Magazine. She explains how the Clinton campaign machine is gearing up for 2016.

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Enter Our SoupOrBowl Recipe Contest!

Friday, January 24, 2014

It's the Super Bowl, public-radio style: We're hosting the world's first-ever Soup or Bowl recipe contest. Enter your best recipe for soup (or something that can be served in a bowl) and compete for bragging rights and a chance to celebrate your dish with our head judge, The Sporkful's Dan Pashman.

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Dungeons & Dragons Turns 40-Years-Old

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Forty years ago this month, a game was introduced to the world that changed pop culture forever: Dungeons & Dragons. Helping The Takeaway to celebrate this milestone, and explain how Dungeons & Dragons withstood the test of time, is David Ewalt, author of "Of Dice and Men: The Story of Dungeons and Dragons and the People Who Play It," and John August, a D&D enthusiast and screenwriter behind “Frankenweenie,” “The Corpse Bride,” “Big Fish,” “Charlie's Angels,” “Go,” and many other blockbuster films.

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Why Do Some Childhood Memories Fade?

Thursday, January 23, 2014

New research out of Emory University has identified a crucial turning point in memory development. Scientists have found that by age seven, childhood amnesia begins to take effect, in which early memories are forgotten at a faster rate, and sometimes lost entirely. Joining The Takeaway to explain the science behind our childhood memories is Patricia Bauer, professor of psychology at Emory University and lead author on this study.

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NC Leads the Way in Cutting Aid for the Jobless

Thursday, January 23, 2014

At the end of last year as the federal government allowed long-term unemployment benefits to expire for 1.3 million Americans, and North Carolina led the way in also reducing benefits. Paul Tine is a North Carolina state representative that voted for the unemployment cuts. Jaslyn Roberts is the career center director for Charlotte Works, a job training organization. Together they explain how things have changed in the state since benefits have been cut.

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Solving the Puzzle of China, the Web & Wyoming

Thursday, January 23, 2014

What do half a billion Chinese people, the Internet and Cheyenne, Wyoming have in common? One of the largest Internet failures in history. An Internet outage this week affected nearly every user in China—the country’s web traffic was mistakenly redirected to a company based in the Wyoming building. Jason Q. Ng is the author of "Blocked on Weibo: What Gets Suppressed on China’s Version of Twitter (And Why)." He joins The Takeaway to explain what went wrong.

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Syria's Peace Talks: A Complicated Patchwork

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Central to the Syrian peace talks is the question of how the international community should deal with President Bashar al-Assad, particularly as the evidence of war crimes continues to mount. Bente Scheller, author of "The Wisdom of Syria's Waiting Game: Foreign Policy Under the Assads," puts these talks into historical context. Marine Olivesi, a freelance reporter for PRI's The World, explores why the Free Syrian Army is no longer fighting with just Bashar al-Assad.

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Can You End Homelessness by Providing Homes?

Thursday, January 23, 2014

In 2005, Utah set out to end chronic homelessness within 10 years by providing each homeless person with an apartment and a social worker. As they inch closer to their deadline, it looks like the state could actually pull it off: The state says the homeless population has shrunk by nearly 75 percent since Utah started its initiative. Whittney Evans reports on local government for Takeaway affiliate station KUER. She joins the program to discuss how this program works.

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'Agony and Horror' in Ohio Execution

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

The case of Dennis McGuire has raised questions about the future of death penalty execution in the United States. Ohio officials executed McGuire last Thursday, through a new, two-drug, lethal injection protocol. Eyewitness accounts indicate that McGuire suffered excruciating pain before he died. David Waisel served as an expert witness for McGuire's defense team, and he testified that McGuire would suffer "pain and agony" before he died. By all accounts, he was right.

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General Wesley Clark on Putin, Ukraine & the NSA

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

More and more signs indicate that the 2014 Olympics will be not just a showcase of Russia's security forces, but a showcase for Russian President Vladimir Putin's broader ambitions in Europe. General Wesley Clark was the NATO Supreme Commander back in the 90's. In a wide ranging conversation, General Clark says Putin's ambitions with Ukraine were apparent more than two decades ago. Andrew S. Weiss, Vice President for Studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, also weighs in on the latest news coming out of Ukraine.

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The Magic of a Snow Day, Now and Then

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Though heavy snowfalls can conjure feelings of frustration for commuters, a bed of freshly packed snow can also bring back memories of days passed when thick snow meant a day at home from school. Todd Zwillich, Takeaway Washington Correspondent, gives us some of his best snow day memories. Lester Laminack is the author of the children's book "Snow Day!" When he's not writing books he's a professor of education at Western Carolina University. He joins The Takeaway to explain how snow days bring back childhood memories.

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A New Chapter for the Voting Rights Act?

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

A bipartisan group of lawmakers have introduced a new bill that takes up some of the issues identified in the Supreme Court’s June decision in Shelby Counter v. Holder. Joining The Takeaway to explain the aspects of the new bill are Erin O’Brien, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Massachusetts Boston, and Todd Zwillich, The Takeaway's Washington Correspondent, who has been following the politics behind the proposed update to the Voting Rights Act. 

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Drama Continues for Christie Camp

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

It looks like things may continue to worsen for New Jersey Governor Chris Christie before they improve. Hoboken Mayor Dawn Zimmer has revealed that the Christie administration held Hurricane Sandy recovery money hostage, tying the aid to her support for a real estate development project. Joining The Takeaway for an update on Bridgegate is New Jersey Public Radio reporter Matt Katz.

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Our Sleepy Sun?

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

While most meteorologists focus on weather patterns, we also know that the Sun's behavior plays a role in regulating winter temperatures. The word "sleepy" is being used about the Sun right now—the likes of which has not been seen for about 100 years. David Hathaway is Solar Astronomer at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center. He explains the latest solar cycle and what impacts it could have on climate change.

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