Streams

T.J. Raphael

Digital Content Editor of The Takeaway

T.J. Raphael appears in the following:

The Trial That Unleashed Child Abuse Hysteria

Monday, March 10, 2014

The Retro Report documentary team looked back at a courtroom drama that dragged on for years, and produced a climate of mistrust between parents and preschool teachers during the mid-1980s. During the McMartin Preschool trial of the 1980s, the staff of a California preschool was accused of sexually abusing young children in horrific satanic rituals. The accusations set off wide-spread panic among parents in Manhattan Beach, California. Barbara Dury, contributing producer for Retro Report, looks back on the case.

Comments [2]

Ben & Jerry Take on Citizens United

Monday, March 10, 2014

Four years ago the U.S. Supreme Court made a blockbuster decision in the case of Citizens United, which dramatically changed the way political campaigns are funded. With the midterm election season about to get underway, The Takeaway speaks with the founders of the ice cream company Ben & Jerry’s—Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield—about money and politics in the post-Citizens United era and their campaign to reverse the Citizens United decision.

Comments [8]

Inside the Paralympics: Downhill Skiing

Monday, March 10, 2014

Ralph Green, the first African-American man to make the U.S. Paralympics Alpine Skiing National Team, says he's proudly representing both his country and his hometown of Brooklyn.

Comment

Who Really Benefits from Daylight Saving Time?

Friday, March 07, 2014

Most Americans will "spring forward" this weekend and lose an hour to daylight saving time. But daylight saving is hardly standardized in the United States, much less the world. In fact, some say it's "madness."

Comments [10]

Bionic Limbs Blur the Lines of Disability

Friday, March 07, 2014

Everyone has something they'd like to change about their bodies. At the same time, science and medicine keep breaking new ground in improving how human bodies function. Technology continues to improve how our bodies function, allowing people to achieve the impossible. Regan Brashear, producer and director of "Fixed: The Science/Fiction of Human Enhancement," discusses what these technological advances mean for those with disabilities.

Comments [4]

News Quiz | Week of March 07

Friday, March 07, 2014

Are you a newsie? Do you know what's happening from Washington to Hollywood to Pyongyang? Are you one of those people who always need to know? Do you listen to the news religiously, convinced that what you hear will give you an edge? Be smarter than your pals. Prep your dinner party factoids. Gauge your knowledge about what happened this week, as heard on The Takeaway.

Comments [2]

What Will Putin Do Next?

Friday, March 07, 2014

As the crisis in Crimea continues to escalate, the threat of a new balkanization is fostering a sense of insecurity across the West. Rodger Baker, vice president of Asia-Pacific analysis at the global intelligence research firm Stratfor, explores Russia's occupation of Crimea. Though the conflict can have long-term geopolitical impacts, there is also a great deal of fear emerging in the Crimean peninsula for ethnic minorities. Natalia Antelava, a reporter for the BBC, The New Yorker and PRI's The World, explains.

Comments [2]

Your Take: Signs of Spring!

Friday, March 07, 2014

Daylight saving time begins this Sunday, March 9 and as we turn the clocks forward, we want you to look forward too. What signs of spring are you seeing? Green shoots? What about the birds? What will convince you to pack away the winter woolies? We’re asking for your stories, your sounds and your sights of spring. Your photos that capture the first signs of the season can be sent here to our Facebook page , or by tweeting or instagraming us a photo with the hashtag #MySpringSign. We'll collect your pics and stories, and we’ll celebrate the arrival of spring here at TheTakeaway.org.

Comments [2]

History of the Paralympics and Superhuman Flow

Friday, March 07, 2014

The 2014 Paralympic Winter Games begin Friday in Sochi, with athletes representing more than 45 nations. Though it wasn't always this way, today the games are as elite in the sporting world as the traditional Olympics. A look at the history and culture of the Paralympics with Paralympic historian and author Dr. Ian Brittain. As these athletes compete over the next 10 days, the public will undoubtedly observe the highest levels of athleticism. What does it takes to have "flow" and physical abilities to their limits? Steven Kotler explains.

Comments [1]

Today's Highlights | March 06, 2014

Thursday, March 06, 2014

Also on Today's Show: An update on the trial of three Al Jazeera English journalists charged with spreading false news and belonging to a “terrorist group" with Reza Sayah, a Cairo-based CNN international correspondent. The three are among 20 journalists accused by Egyptian authorities of assisting the banned Muslim Brotherhood...How would Plato, one of the world’s greatest philosophers, reflect on the 21st century? Rebecca Newberger Goldstein, the author of "Plato at the Googleplex: Why Philosophy Won't Go Away," looks at whether modern-day civilizations are living up to the Greek ideals.

Comments [3]

Is the SAT Still the Right Metric to Test Student Aptitude?

Thursday, March 06, 2014

On Wednesday, College Board President David Coleman announced that SAT is getting re-calibrated. Its vocabulary words will be less arcane and more in alignment with what students encounter in college courses. The 9-year-old essay section will become optional, and will be scored separately.  The math questions will focus now focus on linear equations, functions, ratios, percentages and proportional reasoning.  There are other changes, too.  Julia Ryan, writes for and produces The Atlantic's Education Channel.  She's been following the changes to the SAT and weighs in on whether the SAT is still a good metric to test student aptitude. 

Comments [14]

In the Crimea Crisis, the U.S. Turns the Screw

Thursday, March 06, 2014

Is the Ukraine crisis a reassertion of Russian pride and is Crimea becoming the symbol of Russia's reemergence as an empire in Eastern Europe? Many on Capitol Hill and in academia have long argued that the moment would come when Russia would try to get back some of what it lost after the fall of the Soviet Union—is this new crisis an "I told you so" moment from the voices in D.C. who never believed the Cold War is over? Todd Zwillich, Takeaway Washington Correspondent, and Michael Hirsh, Chief Correspondent for the National Journal, join The Takeaway to explain.

Comments [4]

Time to Rethink Solitary Confinement & Death Row?

Thursday, March 06, 2014

There are currently 80,000 people being held in solitary confinement across America. Many of these prisoners have been there for years or decades without any human contact. In an effort to understand what these prisoners are feeling, Colorado Department of Corrections Executive Director Rick Raemisch submitted himself to 20 hours of “administration segregation,” more commonly known as solitary confinement. Three Oscar-winners also took action to explore how prisoners are feeling behind bars. Documentarian Alex Gibney, narrator Susan Sarandon, and producer Robert Redford, coalesced to create “Death Row Stories.”

Comments [3]

Ann Druyan, Wife of the Late Carl Sagan, Reflects on 'Cosmos,' Now and Then

Wednesday, March 05, 2014

The original "Cosmos" aired in 1980 on PBS, and in just 13 episodes, astrophysicist Carl Sagan captured the hearts and minds of a generation. On Sunday, more than 30 years after the original series began, "Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey" will premiere. Hosted by Neil deGrasse Tyson, the new series pays direct homage to Sagan's original vision, in part because the original and the re-boot share an executive producer in Ann Druyan, wife of the late Carl Sagan. Today Druyan discusses the series and her life with Sagan.

Comments [5]

Inside the Intersection of Faith and Rhythm in Islam

Wednesday, March 05, 2014

The role of music within Islam has long been a source of deep controversy and debate in the Muslim world. Some Islamic scholars believe music is strictly forbidden, while others have found ways to incorporate music elements in their worship and spirituality. It's the intersection of faith and rhythm that Hisham Aidi charts in his new book, “Rebel Music: Race, Empire, and the New Muslim Youth Culture.” In "Rebel Music," Aidi explores the myriad ways practitioners of Islam around the world have used music to express their faith–and politics–in times of transition.

Comment

Today's Highlights | March 5, 2014

Wednesday, March 05, 2014

Also on Today's Show: On Tuesday, President Barack Obama submitted a $3.9 trillion budget that calls for spending cuts, more than $1 trillion in new taxes to slow borrowing over the next decade, and more than $55 billion in new spending...It looks like scientists have discovered a positive twist on the polar vortex: It’s killing destructive insects that cost the U.S. government and homeowners billions each year...A look at some workplace tips from Toyota’s factory productivity specialist that are surprisingly low-tech. 

Comments [3]

Here are the U.S.'s Options in the Ukraine

Wednesday, March 05, 2014

Russian forces in Crimea, violent protests in Kiev, escalating tensions between West and East. Here's a breakdown of the proposals Congressional leaders are crafting in response to the Ukraine-Russia crisis.

Comments [2]

China's Stake in the Ukraine-Russia Conflict

Tuesday, March 04, 2014

With Russia in the spotlight, China is watching the unrest in Ukraine from the sidelines. In recent years, China has invested a total of $10 billion dollars in Ukraine, and pledged $8 billion more last December. Jonathan Fenby, China director of the research company Trusted Sources, and Timothy Snyder, professor of history at Yale University, examine China's financial interests in the region, and the Chinese investment in the outcome of the Ukraine-Russia conflict.

Comments [2]

Your Carl Sagan Stories

Tuesday, March 04, 2014

Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson and host of "Cosmos 2014" will revisit the passion and evangelical energy of the late Carl Sagan by examining science, the unknown, and humanity's quest for understanding in what Tyson calls "the greatest story ever told." In many ways, the return of the "Cosmos" series is the return of the intellectual comet of Carl Sagan—he believed that the future was all about understanding science. Who is your Carl Sagan mentor today? Do you have a Sagan story? What would Dr. Sagan make of our world today?

Comments [7]

The Crimea Crisis: Views from Moscow & Ukraine

Tuesday, March 04, 2014

The international community is on edge as the crisis between Ukraine and Russia continues to develop. Today The Takeaway examines the crisis in Crimea from the Russian and Ukrainian perspectives. Dmitry Babich, political analyst for the Voice of Russia Radio, explains the view from Moscow. Representing the Ukrainian-American perspective is Borys Potapenko, former president and current vice chair of the Ukrainian Congress Committee in Detroit.

Comments [7]