Streams

Scott Horton

a contributing editor to Harper's Magazine

Scott Horton appears in the following:

Guatnanamo Suicides Update

Thursday, May 29, 2014

New documents and testimony reveal more about three 2006 deaths at the detention center and a possible government cover-up.

Comment

WikiLeaks Around the World

Friday, December 03, 2010

Derek Stoffel, national reporter for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, discusses what the WikiLeaks cables have to say about Canada.  Then Scott Horton, contributing editor to Harper's Magazine and blogger for Harpers.org, talks about the leaked cables out of Madrid that reveal efforts by the U.S. State Department to obstruct criminal investigations involving Spain. And Time magazine Washington correspondent Massimo Calabresi talks about Julian Assange, the man behind WikiLeaks.

Comments [10]

"Suicides" at Guantanamo Bay

Wednesday, March 24, 2010

A new investigation in Harper’s magazine is raising questions about whether the deaths of a number of detainees who were held at Guantanamo Bay Prison should really be classified as homicides. We’ll talk to Scott Horton, Contributing Editor of Harper'sand professor at Columbia Law School. Read the article

Comments [6]

Alleged Cover-up of Prisoner Deaths at Guantánamo

Wednesday, January 20, 2010

Several soldiers who served at Guantánamo Bay in 2006 have alleged that the deaths of three Guantánamo inmates, previously ruled suicides by the U.S. government, were nothing of the sort ... and that the government has covered up the truth.

Comment

Following Up: The Memos

Friday, May 08, 2009

Scott Horton, law professor and a contributing editor at Harper's Magazine who writes their “No Comment” blog, update on the possibility of accountability of torture memo authors.

Comments [15]

Dodging Bullets

Friday, May 08, 2009

Scott Horton, law professor and a contributing editor at Harper's Magazine who writes their No Comment blog, explains why it may be very difficult for the Justice Department to prosecute the Bush Administration officials responsible for the torture memos. Plus, results of the bank stress tests; explaining the payroll tax; ...

Justice Deferred?

Wednesday, March 04, 2009

Scott Horton, a law professor and contributing editor at Harpers Magazine, where he writes the No Comment blog, talks about the recent Justice Department's release of memos detailing the Bush Administration's presidential powers.

Comments [21]