Streams

Rob Stein

Rob Stein appears in the following:

Big Measles Outbreaks Worry Federal Health Officials

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Eight outbreaks of measles have infected at least 159 people so far this year, the CDC reports. All of the outbreaks were caused by people traveling internationally and bringing the virus back to the U.S. Communities that don't vaccinate children for religious reasons were hardest hit.

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FDA Ratchets Down On Prescribing Of OxyContin And Other Opioids

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

In the latest attempt to stem an epidemic of opioid painkiller overdoses, the FDA tightened prescribing guidelines. The drugs should only be used for patients with severe pain when other treatments have failed, the agency says, not for moderate pain.

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Microbe Transplants Treat Some Diseases That Drugs Can't Fix

Monday, September 09, 2013

When an especially nasty intestinal bug threatened 86-year-old Billie Iverson, an unusual transplant saved her. The medical solution, still experimental, was to replace her dangerous digestive bacteria with a healthier mix of microbes.

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From Birth, Our Microbes Become As Personal As A Fingerprint

Monday, September 09, 2013

Trillions of microbes live on and in the human body, tucked into very different ecosystems. Some like the dark, warm confines of the mouth. Others prefer the desert-dry skin of the forearm. The biggest and most active collection of microbes hangs out in the gut.

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How A Change In Gut Microbes Can Affect Weight

Thursday, September 05, 2013

Mice that got microbe transplants from obese humans gained more weight and accumulated more fat than mice that received microbes from lean humans. The findings, though preliminary, suggest a future path for obesity treatment.

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Kids' Use Of Electronic Cigarettes Doubles

Thursday, September 05, 2013

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 1.78 million students in the U.S. have tried electronic cigarettes. Their use has risen dramatically in just one year.

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Diverse Gut Microbes, A Trim Waistline And Health Go Together

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Lean people tend to have many more kinds of intestinal bacteria than obese people. Having too few species, regardless of your weight, appears to increase the risk for Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer.

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Brains Of Dying Rats Yield Clues About Near-Death Experiences

Monday, August 12, 2013

Researchers discovered what appears to be a momentary increase in electrical activity in the brain associated with consciousness. As the brain struggles to survive, it also struggles to make sense of many neurons firing in the survival attempt.

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Staying Healthy May Mean Learning To Love Our Microbiomes

Monday, July 22, 2013

Scientists are investigating the microscopic world that lives in and on our bodies. It's becoming clear that these tiny companions play a much more complex and important role in human health than thought. But we don't yet know enough about the microbiome to use it to prevent and treat disease.

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Gut Bacteria We Pick Up As Kids Stick With Us For Decades

Thursday, July 04, 2013

An experimental "gut check" test can tell us more about the bacteria that live inside us. By studying the way the microbial populations change over time, researchers think they may have a new tool for monitoring health.

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Scientists Grow A Simple, Human Liver In A Petri Dish

Thursday, July 04, 2013

The tiny organs created from stem cells aren't complete, but they act like regular livers when transplanted into mice, Japanese scientists say. Still, it will be years before the synthetic organs could help people with liver problems, even if further research all works out as hoped.

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Proposed Changes In Organ Donation Stir Debate

Monday, June 24, 2013

Donation after cardiac death involves removing organs minutes after life-support has been stopped for patients who still have at least some brain activity. Is that enough time to make sure a person won't recover?

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FDA Backs Off On Regulation Of Fecal Transplants

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Fecal transplants are being used more often to treat life-threatening bacterial infections. But the Food and Drug Administration worried that the still-experimental procedure put patients at risk. Now it is dropping plans to restrict transplants after doctors and patients complained.

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Girl's Need Breathes Life Into Debate Over Organ Allocation

Thursday, June 06, 2013

Sarah Murnaghan, 10, has been moved to the adult waiting list for lung transplants. Murnaghan's parents are thrilled for their daughter, who's clinging to life. But a federal judge's ruling is also raising a number of concerns.

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Disinfect All ICU Patients To Reduce 'Superbug' Infections

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Some states have started requiring hospitals to screen their patients for the drug-resistant bacteria known as MRSA. But a study that tested different approaches to reducing infections found that screening first wasn't the most effective approach.

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Research Reveals Yeasty Beasts Living On Our Skin

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

While studying microorganisms on humans is not new, tracking fungi is. In a census of sorts, scientists checked the skin of healthy volunteers. They found an expansive ecosystem of silent inhabitants.

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Stem Cell Milestone Revives Intense Ethical Debate

Thursday, May 16, 2013

Scientists in Oregon have achieved something that has eluded researchers for years. They have created stem cells that are tailored to individual patients, made from cloned embryos. That would open the door to treating many diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, diabetes, spinal cord injuries and many others. But researchers face ethical dilemmas.

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Scientists Clone Human Embryos To Make Stem Cells

Wednesday, May 15, 2013

The achievement is a long-sought step toward harnessing the potential power of such cells to treat diseases. But the discovery raises ethical concerns because it brings researchers closer to cloning humans.

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Parents' Saliva On Pacifiers Could Ward Off Baby's Allergies

Monday, May 06, 2013

Instead of rinsing off the pacifier when it falls out of your baby's mouth, new research suggests that sucking it clean for them could help keep them from developing eczema and asthma. Researchers say the harmless bacteria in parents' saliva works by stimulating the babies' immune system.

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Gut Bacteria's Belch May Play A Role In Heart Disease

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

When gut microbes break down certain foods like red meat and eggs, they produce a compound tied to risks for heart attack, stroke and death, a study found. The research could lead to new ways to prevent heart disease by shifting the mix of gut bacteria.

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