Streams

Rob Stein

Rob Stein appears in the following:

Mix Of Gut Microbes May Play Role In Crohn's Disease

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Research involving more than 1,500 patients suggests people with Crohn's may have too many of the types of gut bacteria that tend to rile the immune system and too few that reduce inflammation.

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Genetic Sequencing May Not Be Ready To Become Routine

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Sequencing someone's genetic code may seem a good way to raise warnings on health risks. But results can be a confusing mess of information that only leaves patients and doctors needlessly scared.

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Blood Test Provides More Accurate Prenatal Testing For Down Syndrome

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

A pregnant woman's blood contains enough fetal DNA for doctors to check whether the baby would be born with Down syndrome. A new blood test is safe and accurate, but it raises ethical concerns.

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Scientists Question Safety Of Genetically Altering Human Eggs

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Researchers say they can replace DNA in human eggs with genetic material from another woman to prevent devastating disorders in children. But big questions remain on safety and ethics.

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Flu Strikes Younger Adults Hard This Year

Thursday, February 20, 2014

Middle-aged and younger adults are being hospitalized at much higher rates than usual. Lower vaccination rates appear to be one reason behind the trend.

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Babies' Immune Systems May Stand Down To Let Good Microbes Grow

Wednesday, November 06, 2013

Parents of new babies know they get sick a lot. That may be because infants deliberately suppress their immune systems so that essential microbes have a chance to settle in. An immune suppression system in the blood of newborn babies could be key to building a healthy microbiome.

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Getting Your Microbes Analyzed Raises Big Privacy Issues

Monday, November 04, 2013

Scientists are asking people to contribute samples of their gut microbes to help figure out how those microbes affect human health. But ethicists say sharing that information, as well as the personal health data that make it useful to researchers, poses risks. That's especially true for children.

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Exploring The Invisible Universe That Lives On Us — And In Us

Monday, November 04, 2013

Bacteria aren't all bad for you. In fact, they may well be the reason you're healthy. Scientists are just starting to figure out the role that the microorganisms that live on the human body play in human health. We dive in to take a microbe's eye view of the hidden world of the human microbiome.

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FDA Seeks To Tighten Controls On Hydrocodone Painkillers

Thursday, October 24, 2013

The painkiller OxyContin is already classified as a Schedule II drug because of the "severe" risk of addiction. Now the Food and Drug Administration wants to move Vicodin and other painkillers containing hydrocodone to Schedule II as well, citing soaring rates of addiction and overdose deaths.

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Big Measles Outbreaks Worry Federal Health Officials

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Eight outbreaks of measles have infected at least 159 people so far this year, the CDC reports. All of the outbreaks were caused by people traveling internationally and bringing the virus back to the U.S. Communities that don't vaccinate children for religious reasons were hardest hit.

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FDA Ratchets Down On Prescribing Of OxyContin And Other Opioids

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

In the latest attempt to stem an epidemic of opioid painkiller overdoses, the FDA tightened prescribing guidelines. The drugs should only be used for patients with severe pain when other treatments have failed, the agency says, not for moderate pain.

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Microbe Transplants Treat Some Diseases That Drugs Can't Fix

Monday, September 09, 2013

When an especially nasty intestinal bug threatened 86-year-old Billie Iverson, an unusual transplant saved her. The medical solution, still experimental, was to replace her dangerous digestive bacteria with a healthier mix of microbes.

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From Birth, Our Microbes Become As Personal As A Fingerprint

Monday, September 09, 2013

Trillions of microbes live on and in the human body, tucked into very different ecosystems. Some like the dark, warm confines of the mouth. Others prefer the desert-dry skin of the forearm. The biggest and most active collection of microbes hangs out in the gut.

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How A Change In Gut Microbes Can Affect Weight

Thursday, September 05, 2013

Mice that got microbe transplants from obese humans gained more weight and accumulated more fat than mice that received microbes from lean humans. The findings, though preliminary, suggest a future path for obesity treatment.

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Kids' Use Of Electronic Cigarettes Doubles

Thursday, September 05, 2013

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 1.78 million students in the U.S. have tried electronic cigarettes. Their use has risen dramatically in just one year.

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Diverse Gut Microbes, A Trim Waistline And Health Go Together

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Lean people tend to have many more kinds of intestinal bacteria than obese people. Having too few species, regardless of your weight, appears to increase the risk for Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer.

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Brains Of Dying Rats Yield Clues About Near-Death Experiences

Monday, August 12, 2013

Researchers discovered what appears to be a momentary increase in electrical activity in the brain associated with consciousness. As the brain struggles to survive, it also struggles to make sense of many neurons firing in the survival attempt.

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Staying Healthy May Mean Learning To Love Our Microbiomes

Monday, July 22, 2013

Scientists are investigating the microscopic world that lives in and on our bodies. It's becoming clear that these tiny companions play a much more complex and important role in human health than thought. But we don't yet know enough about the microbiome to use it to prevent and treat disease.

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Gut Bacteria We Pick Up As Kids Stick With Us For Decades

Thursday, July 04, 2013

An experimental "gut check" test can tell us more about the bacteria that live inside us. By studying the way the microbial populations change over time, researchers think they may have a new tool for monitoring health.

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Scientists Grow A Simple, Human Liver In A Petri Dish

Thursday, July 04, 2013

The tiny organs created from stem cells aren't complete, but they act like regular livers when transplanted into mice, Japanese scientists say. Still, it will be years before the synthetic organs could help people with liver problems, even if further research all works out as hoped.

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