Streams

Rob Manning

Rob Manning appears in the following:

Classroom Views: Learning Gets Loud in Portland

Thursday, March 20, 2014

This week, we're taking a close-up look to see how learning actually happens in real schools across the nation. Today we go to Earl Boyles Elementary School in Portland Oregon—a school that's been experimenting with how to teach young students with poor English language skills how to read and write proficiently. Oregon Public Radio reporter Rob Manning provides a glimpse inside the classrooms of Earl Boyles.

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From Shop Class To Shipyard: Oregon's Plan For Industrial Interns

Friday, November 29, 2013

Manufacturers in Oregon want to hire high school students. But they don't want the kinds of high school students that colleges are after — the kind who have amazing test scores and will spend hours perfecting essays. They want teenagers who want to paint, weld and work with their hands. The hope is that those teens will turn into enthusiastic workers in an industry where the current workforce is headed toward retirement.

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Study: Portland's 'Blue Line' Attracts Most Investment Of U.S. Transit Projects

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

OPB

The Blue Line — TriMet’s light rail route from Gresham to Hillsboro  — attracted the biggest real estate investments of any surface transit system in the country, according to a new study. But the study also finds that rapid bus lines can garner similar returns -- and cost far less than light rail.

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The Issues at Hand: Education Reform Over the Next Four Years

Tuesday, January 22, 2013

Shortly following the November elections, a Gallup poll revealed that 68 percent of Americans believe that President Obama will improve education in his second term. Education reporters Beth Fertig and Rob Manning explain whether the optimism is warranted.

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Why STEM Education Needs the Arts, Too

Tuesday, January 15, 2013

The national agenda on competitiveness and investing in education is centered on the acronym STEM, which stands for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. It is these subjects that officials say need to be stressed in public schools to drive the future of the United States economy. But some educators, including John Maeda, think there is a spelling problem here.

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