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Rhitu Chatterjee

Rhitu Chatterjee appears in the following:

Ear Wax From Whales Keeps Record Of Ocean Contaminants

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Layers of wax in the marine mammals' ears can be read like tree rings, scientists say, recording a whale's age and also information about pollutants in the water the whale swam through. Wax from a blue whale that washed ashore in 2007 contained surprisingly high levels of DDT.

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Meet The Olinguito, The Newest Member Of The Raccoon Family

Thursday, August 15, 2013

This cousin of the raccoon is the first new carnivore discovered in the Western Hemisphere in 35 years. Native to the Andes Mountains of Colombia and Ecuador where it's still living, the olinguito was actually first identified in a Field Museum specimen storage room in Chicago.

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Dolphins Recognize The Calls Of Long-Lost Friends

Wednesday, August 07, 2013

Scientists have known that dolphins recognize each other by the sound of each animal's signature whistle. But new research shows that dolphins remember and respond to these whistles for an incredibly long time — even after they've been separated from each other.

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Don't Blame Your Lousy Night's Sleep On The Moon — Yet

Friday, July 26, 2013

Over drinks in the light of a full moon, a group of Swiss sleep researchers recently realized they could put a bit of folklore about the moon's disruptive effect on sleep to the test. The answer surprised them and didn't quite win over some other scientists in the field.

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We Call Him Flipper. But What Do The Dolphins Call Him?

Monday, July 22, 2013

Dolphins, like humans, are part of complex social networks. And research now indicates that they use their unique whistle sounds to identify and communicate with each other. "Every time a dolphin heard its signature whistle, it called back, sometimes multiple times," one researcher says.

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Sickle Cell Anemia Is On The Rise Worldwide

Wednesday, July 17, 2013

The number of babies born with the life-threatening disease will climb by a third in the next 40 years, scientists say. The vast majority of sickle cell cases will occur in developing countries, which don't have the resources to treat deadly complications arising from the genetic disorder.

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Barking Up The Family Tree: American Dogs Have Surprising Genetic Roots

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

A few dog breeds indigenous to North America have genetic roots on the continent that stretch back 1,000 years or more. A study finds that their genetic lineages haven't changed much, despite an influx of European pooches.

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Farming Got Hip In Iran Some 12,000 Years Ago, Ancient Seeds Reveal

Monday, July 08, 2013

Archaeologists had considered Iran unimportant in the history of farming – until now. Ancient seeds and farming tools uncovered in Iran reveal Stone Age people there were growing lentils, barley and other crops. The findings offer a snapshot of a time when humans first started experimenting with farming.

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Pitch Perfect: Why Our Shoulders Are Key To Throwing

Thursday, June 27, 2013

Being able to throw stones with power and precision must have been fun for humans' early ancestors. It was essential, too, since we lack the the fangs and claws of other predators. A recent study suggests the ability to fire rocket fastballs depends on shoulder anatomy that chimps don't share.

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WHO Finds Violence Against Women Is 'Shockingly' Common

Thursday, June 20, 2013

The first comprehensive global study to be conducted finds that domestic violence kills many women and leaves others with long-standing physical and mental health problems, including sexually transmitted diseases and depression.

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Animal CSI: Inside The Smithsonian's Feather Forensics Lab

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

A keen eye and extensive knowledge of feathers allows forensic ornithologist Carla Dove (yes, that's her name) figure out from feather and bone fragments which type of bird crashed into a plane or was eaten by a snake. But the expertise has an uncertain future.

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Rule Would List All Chimps As Endangered, Even Lab Animals

Friday, June 14, 2013

Though the regulation proposed by the Fish and Wildlife Service would make it more difficult to use chimpanzees for research purposes, that may not be a problem, some scientists say. Scientific advances show the animals are less medically useful than previously thought.

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Fancy Feet: Wild Cheetahs Excel At Acceleration

Thursday, June 13, 2013

Cheetahs don't often hunt at their top speed, scientists are finding. Come mealtime, what matters most is the animals' ability to accelerate and to take tight corners.

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City Life Disrupts Daily Rhythm Of Birds

Monday, June 10, 2013

City life can be harsh on people. For example, it pushes people to work longer and sleep less. A new study suggests that city life can have a somewhat similar effect on birds too. It shows urban blackbirds wake up earlier and go to bed later than their forest dwelling cousins.

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Why You Have To Scratch That Itch

Friday, May 24, 2013

Itch can be a useful warning sign, or a maddening symptom with no cure. But the origins of itch have long been a mystery. Scientists think they've come closer to understanding the origins of itch in a molecule that makes mice scratch like mad.

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Why Humans Took Up Farming: They Like To Own Stuff

Monday, May 13, 2013

The appeal of owning your own property — and all the private goods that came with it — may have convinced nomadic humans to settle down and take up farming. So says a new study that tried to puzzle out why early farmers bothered with agriculture.

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This Bat Knows How To Drink

Tuesday, May 07, 2013

The Pallas' long-tongued bat has a neat trick at the tip of its tongue — tiny hairlike structures that fill with blood and stand straight out. This turns the tongue into a nectar-slurping mop at just the right time.

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