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NPR Staff

NPR Staff appears in the following:

Aquarium Sculptors Create Coral For Conservation Awareness

Saturday, June 08, 2013

Colorful, fake coral gives aquarium visitors an eco-friendly glimpse inside a reef. At the National Aquarium in Baltimore, a new reef exhibit presents an artistic challenge to the coral fabrication team.

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John Mellencamp, Stephen King, T-Bone Burnett Make A Musical

Saturday, June 08, 2013

No, it's not the setup to a joke. John Mellencamp, Stephen King and T-Bone Burnett are the creative team behind Ghosts of Darkland County, a stage show based on a true story of small-town tragedy.

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Time-Traveling Serial Killer Hunts For 'The Shining Girls'

Saturday, June 08, 2013

Over the last 15 years, the South African writer Lauren Beukes has been a journalist, a screenwriter, a documentarian — and most recently, a novelist. Her new book is called The Shining Girls, a summer thriller about a time-traveling serial killer and the victim who escapes to hunt him down.

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Aoife O'Donovan: Digging Up Musical 'Fossils'

Saturday, June 08, 2013

The singer, best known as the voice of the alt-bluegrass band Crooked Still, is releasing her solo debut. It's full of songs from and inspired by the Irish folk tradition she grew up with.

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A Restaurant Brainstorms How To Afford Obamacare

Saturday, June 08, 2013

Restaurants face particular challenges adapting to the new health care laws. The CFO of one restaurant chain says it's not as simple as just cutting employee pay or raising prices to bring in the extra money needed.

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'Joker' Asks: Have You Heard The One About The Joke-Telling Poet?

Saturday, June 08, 2013

Andrew Hudgins is a prominent poet, but what he'd really rather be doing is telling jokes — the more daring, the better. His new memoir, The Joker, explores the way uncomfortable and taboo jokes create learning and communication, and the important role they've played in his life.

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Judy Blume Hits The Big Screen With 'Tiger Eyes' Adaptation

Friday, June 07, 2013

With the help of her son Lawrence Blume, Judy Blume has adapted her 1981 novel into a film. The widely beloved coming-of-age author speaks with NPR's Audie Cornish about turning the book into a movie, and how the themes in Tiger Eyes echo her own life.

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Finding An Anchor For A Life Set Adrift By A Shipwreck

Friday, June 07, 2013

Shengqiao Chen and Zehao Zhou met 20 years ago after a ship that was smuggling Chinese immigrants into the U.S. ran aground just outside New York City.

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A Latina Teen "Comes Out" As Black

Thursday, June 06, 2013

When Elaine Vilorio moved to the US as a young child, she encountered new notions of race. Now a high school senior, she talks about crafting an identity that's 'racially black and culturally Hispanic.'

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Chef Roblé Ali On Difficult Clients And Staying Skinny

Thursday, June 06, 2013

Chef Roblé Ali has prepared meals for big names, including President Obama and Michael Jackson. He climbed the ranks in the restaurant world and now, he runs his own catering service and has a reality TV show. He talks to guest host Celeste Headlee about serving clients with unusual tastes, and shares tips on hosting summer parties.

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Christian McBride: Music Is About People, Not Grammys

Thursday, June 06, 2013

The bassist has made the rounds with some of the best jazz musicians in the world, including Wynton Marsalis and Herbie Hancock. But for McBride, staying in the swing of things means reaching audiences. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks with McBride about his new album, People Music.

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The Force Is With The Navajo: 'Star Wars' Gets A New Translation

Wednesday, June 05, 2013

If you've ever wondered how to say "May the Force be with you" in Navajo, you're in luck. On July 3, a new translation of the 1977 classic will be unveiled on the Navajo Nation reservation in Arizona.

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'The Greatest Songs You've Never Heard,' Rescued From History

Wednesday, June 05, 2013

Three for a Song is a performing trio with a love for the 1930s, during which some of the greatest songwriters who ever lived wrote music that would enter the canon of American popular song. But the group has recently added a quirk to its repertoire: performing songs that were never popular.

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When (And How) Hollywood Goes To China

Wednesday, June 05, 2013

The Chinese moviegoing audience is too big for American studios to ignore. But getting a film shown there can mean making concessions to Chinese government officials.

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'Siamese Twins' Still Fascinate, Two Centuries Later

Wednesday, June 05, 2013

Born to Chinese parents, conjoined twins Eng and Chang Bunker became famous throughout the world as "Siamese twins." After years of being displayed at exhibitions, they settled in the mountains of North Carolina in the 1830s. NPR's Michel Martin learns more about their remarkable story from descendant Alex Sink.

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Book Explores Downfall Of An Indian-American Business Icon

Tuesday, June 04, 2013

Rajat Gupta was one of the wealthiest and most successful men in America. Why would he throw that away on an insider-trading scheme? A new book from financial journalist Anita Raghavan tries to uncover the motivations of a man who lost everything in the Galleon Group scandal.

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Hello Muddah, Hello Drama: The Brief Bloom Of Parodist Allan Sherman

Monday, June 03, 2013

Sherman worked a tight niche: classic songs rewritten to tickle a Jewish audience's funny bone. A new biography, Overweight Sensation: The Life and Comedy of Allan Sherman, explains how the performer's 1960s crossover fell in line with a collective awakening to ethnic identity in America.

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Authentic Early Jazz, From A 23-Year-Old 'WomanChild'

Monday, June 03, 2013

Vocalist Cecile McLorin Salvant and pianist Aaron Diehl, both in their 20s, have already racked up major industry prizes. They took radically different paths to get there, but on Salvant's new album, they find ways to honor old traditions as young people.

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Eleanor Friedberger Unashamed Of Her Favorite Sounds

Sunday, June 02, 2013

On her second solo release, the Fiery Furnaces singer mines the music of her birth decade. "I'm not embarrassed to say I love the sound of an Elton John record or I love the sound of a Carole King record," she says. "That's my taste."

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Why Some Schools Want To Expel Suspensions

Sunday, June 02, 2013

Research shows suspensions are disproportionately applied to minorities and give students a fast track to dropping out and to the juvenile justice system. The Los Angeles Unified School District recently instituted a ban on certain suspensions, but finding a viable alternative is a complex task.

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