Streams

Mary Ann Giordano

Mary Ann Giordano has been covering New York City since the Koch administration. She has been an editor at The New York Times for 10 years. Follow her @magiorNYT.

Mary Ann Giordano appears in the following:

What's Your Score?

Tuesday, August 07, 2012

SchoolBook has updated its schools data, and the pages for all public schools (that includes charters) now have the latest available information on: English language arts and math scores for grades 3 to 8; parent survey results; Regents exam results; graduation rates; SAT scores, and official public school enrollment, broken down by race.

Read More

Comment

Question of the Week (Decade?): Are Charter Schools Better?

Friday, July 20, 2012

Are charters really doing a better job educating the city’s public school students than the traditional public schools? That was the question of the week, after state test scores came out on Tuesday showing not only far greater proficiency in English and math by third through eighth graders who attend the city’s charters, but also far more improvement this year.

Read More

Comment

Week Ends With Uncertainty for 24 City Schools

Friday, July 13, 2012

The big news of the past week was a judge's decision to let stand an arbitrator's ruling that forbid the city from removing teachers from 24 schools that the city had been hoping to close. But with 55 days left until the opening bell for the 2012-2013 school year, there is confusion about just what's next for those schools. Also in the news: Korean "parachute children," Stuyvesant's cheating scandal and the lack of gym time in schools.

Read More

Comment

As Public School Costs Rise, Reports Draw Diverse Reactions

Friday, July 06, 2012

In a series of reports, SchoolBook, The New York Times and WNYC explored the rising cost of public school for parents of New York City schoolchildren — from the increased reliance on parents for everyday supplies to the growing phenomenon of extreme fund-raising at some city schools. Here is a recap of the reports, as well as readers' reactions to what they read and heard.

Read More

Comment

The Week That Was: Appealing a Turnaround Decision, Changing No Child Left Behind

Friday, July 06, 2012

Here's a roundup of the news that occurred this week -- including the city's comeback to an arbitrator's rejection of its "turnaround" hiring plans and the Obama administration's re-shaping of the No Child Left Behind law.

Read More

Comment

Questions on Special Ed? There's a Hot Line for That

Friday, June 29, 2012

One of the many big changes coming to the city schools next year is the revamping of the special education program, which calls for more inclusion classrooms, with special education classes reserved for only the most severely disabled students. Now comes word that the city is creating a hot line so that parents can easily reach education officials if they have questions or problems with their child's placement or services that can't be addressed by the school.

Read More

Comment

New Congressional Nominee Favors Subsidizing Private Schools

Thursday, June 28, 2012

Assemblyman Hakeem Jeffries, hot off primary night where he won the Democratic nomination for Congress, set off a controversy when he came out in favor of support for private and religious schools -- but not for vouchers.

Read More

Comment

On Final Day of Public School Year, Stuyvesant Reels Over Reports of Cheating

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

At Stuyvesant High School, the school year ended on a negative note, with widespread coverage of a suspected cheating scandal. More than 80 students are suspected of communicating via text message about exams, and an investigation is ongoing.

Read More

Comment

New City Budget Restores Money for Day Care and After-School Programs

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

The annual city budget dance has ended, and the City Council and Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg have waltzed to a deal for $68.5 billion that includes no tax increases, no firehouse closings, no widespread layoffs of teachers or others — and, in fact, slight increases to some services for children and families.

Read More

Comment

Conditional 'Yes' on Money for 24 City Schools

Monday, June 25, 2012

Last week ended with a flurry of news, in part because of the conclusion of the legislative session in Albany. But before departing for the weekend, the state Education Department slipped in a decision on providing $60 million in aid to 24 "turnaround schools" in the city. And this week -- the last week of public school -- starts with news of audits of an expensive kindergarten program for special-needs children, and more on the Horace Mann School sexual misconduct allegations. Oh, yes, and there are a few graduations.

Read More

Comment

Now That a Disclosure Bill Is Passed, What's Next?

Friday, June 22, 2012

Now that the legislative battle over disclosure of teacher evaluation data is over, what does the future look like? Some of the coverage of Albany's vote on the controversial bill, which would allow only parents to see the data related to their children's teachers, speculated that a fair amount of chaos lies ahead.

Read More

Comment

A Desk for Every Dropout, Every Hour, Every School Day

Thursday, June 21, 2012

Regents, heat, finals, heat, graduation, heat, and confusing end-of-year schedules are on the minds of city school parents, students and teachers this Thursday in June. So as a diversion, let's go to Washington, where a visual stunt on the National Mall tried to focus attention on the state of the nation's schools.

Read More

Comment

A Swimming Opportunity for Second-Grade Students

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

About 10 percent of second-grade students in the city are learning to swim because of a program developed by Adrian Benepe, the city parks commissioner, who was convinced that many drownings of city residents could be avoided. And what's the best way to configure middle school for children between the ages of 10 and 13? Those are some of the stories in news on this Wednesday.

Read More

Comment

Charter Schools Face Opposition to Plan for Special Needs Children

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Charter schools are under increasing pressure to admit and provide more services for children with special needs. This spring, they have been asking the Legislature for the authority to form coalitions, so they can pool resources that will help them fulfill their mandate. The bill seemed to be cruising along, but now the state teachers' union has thrown up a roadblock.

Read More

Comment

Aiming for School Diversity in Williamsburg, With Little Progress

Monday, June 18, 2012

How difficult is it to integrate a city school? Pretty tough, according to the latest article in The New York Times's "A System Divided" series, which has been examining the issue of segregation in the New York City public school system. Also in the news this Monday morning: a principal under fire, sexual misconduct, teacher evaluations and Pearson.

Read More

Comment

Walcott Pushes for Easier Firing in Sexual Misconduct Cases

Friday, June 15, 2012

The New York City schools chancellor, Dennis M. Walcott, is ramping up his efforts to accelerate discipline for teachers accused of sexual misconduct, holding a rare news conference Friday morning to again make his case and writing about the issue in an Op-Ed article in The New York Times.

Read More

Comment

Students Report Cyberbullying Is Pervasive

Thursday, June 14, 2012

Nearly 70 percent of some 10,000 students statewide told legislators they were victims of cyberbullying or knew someone who had been attacked on the Web. A legislator sees this as support for his bill to make cyberbullying a separate crime.

Read More

Comment

Horace Mann Case Prompts New Look at State Sex Abuse Laws

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

In the news this Wednesday, questions about the state's laws on sexual abuse in light of the allegations surrounding Horace Mann, and stalled progress in Albany to move against public schoolteachers who abuse students. Also, does the city know enough before implementing new special education policies citywide? What about parents? And a thief takes students' cellphones.

Read More

Comment

Romney's Education Plan Calls for More School Choices

Thursday, May 24, 2012

In all the months of Republican primaries and early campaigning, the topic of education rarely emerged. That changed on Wednesday when the presumed Republican nominee, Mitt Romney, announced his new education agenda.

Read More

Comment

Two Brooklyn Schools Examined for Cheating

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Allegations of cheating at two of the city's highest-performing public elementary schools have emerged, after teachers at the middle school that many of their students feed into noticed sharp discrepancies between student performance and their previous test scores.

Read More

Comment