Streams

Jonathan Mahler

The New York Times

Mahler is a contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine and author of the book "The Challenge: Hamdan v. Rumsfeld and the Fight over Presidential Power" (2008).

Jonathan Mahler appears in the following:

The Ghosts of Super Bowl Halftime Shows Past

Monday, February 04, 2013

Millions of viewers got to see Beyonce do her thing on the big stage at yesterday’s Super Bowl halftime show last night. But the halftime show wasn’t always a showcase for solo-artists with attitude. Once upon a time, halftime at the Super Bowl meant one thing and one thing alone: Up With People.

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Activist New York

Tuesday, August 07, 2012

Sarah Henry, chief curator at the Museum of the City of New York, wraps up the Activism NY Facebook project from the MCNY and the BLS, and hears from listeners about New York City's activist past. New York Times Magazine contributor Jonathan Mahler, author of the article "Oakland: the Last Refuge of Radical America," discusses Oakland as a center of activism.

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Lessons from Penn State

Friday, July 13, 2012

Jonathan Mahler, contributing writer at The New York Times Magazine and author of the Kindle Single Death Comes to Happy Valley, talks about the findings of the Penn State report issued yesterday, and what they may tell us about other top athletic departments.

 Read the Freeh Report in Full Below

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WikiLeaks Exposes Attempted Deals to Transfer Inmates Out of Gitmo

Tuesday, November 30, 2010

While President Obama has received much criticism for failing to close the Guantánamo Bay prison camp in the first year of his presidency, new classified documents released by WikiLeaks reveal the attempted dealings between the administration and other governments to try and move detainees out of the detention center. In an article in The New York Times, reporter Charlie Savage details attempted deals with Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Lithuania and Albania, among other countries.

Currently 174 inmates remain at the facility: a third of them are from Yemen.

While President Barack Obama has received much criticism for failing to close the Guantanamo Bay prison camp in the first year of his presidency, new classified documents obtained by WikiLeaks reveal the backroom dealings between the administration and other governments to try and move detainees out of the detention center. In an article in The New York Times, reporter Charlie Savage reports on attempted deals with Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Lithuania and Albania, among other countries.

Currently 174 inmates remain at the facility, and a third of them are from Yemen.

We talk with Savage about the findings in the WikiLeaks documents. And Jonathan Mahler explains why it's been so difficult for the United States to transfer the detainees and move forward with closing the prison at Guantanamo Bay.

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George Steinbrenner and the Man Who Banned Him For Life

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

George Steinbrenner reigned as the owner of the New York Yankees for 38 years. In that time his team won seven World Series Championships, 11 American League pennants, 16 AL-East titles. But Steinbrenner was also suspended from baseball twice, one time for life. In 1990, "The Boss" was banned for life for paying a small-time gambler who was  paid $40,000 to dig up some dirt on hall-of-famer, Dave Winfield. Steinbrenner was reinstated in 1993, and went to win five more championships.

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James Patterson, Inc.

Friday, January 29, 2010

Even if you’ve never read one of James Patterson’s best-selling thrillers, you may have seen ads for his books on the subway or even on television. Sarah Crichton, Little, Brown’s publisher from 1996 to 2001, and now publisher of Sarah Crichton Books, an imprint of Farrar, Straus and Giroux, and ...

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9/11 'Mastermind' to be Tried in New York City

Friday, November 13, 2009

Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the self-described mastermind of the Sept. 11 attacks, and four other men accused in the plot will be prosecuted in federal court in New York City, a federal law enforcement official said earlier today.

Joining us to discuss the implications of this announcement on the president's promise to close Guantánamo Bay is Jonathan Mahler, contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine and author of the book "The Challenge: How a Maverick Navy Officer and a Young Law Professor Risked Their Careers to Defend the Constitution — and Won."

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The Future of Guantanamo Bay

Thursday, August 06, 2009

Jonathan Mahler, author of The Challenge, about the Supreme Court case Hamdan v. Rumsfeld, which ruled that detainees have the right to a federal trial, and Chisun Lee, a lawyer and a reporter for ProPublica, discuss the future of Guantanamo and President Obama's plans for the prison. ...

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A Step to Closing Guantanamo? A Detainee in New York

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

The first detainee from Guantanamo Bay prison to face civilian trial in the U.S. pleaded "not guilty" in a New York court on Tuesday. Ahmed Ghailani is charged with helping to coordinate the bombing of U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania. The transfer and trial of this detainee is viewed as an important step in the Obama administration’s plan to close Guantanamo Bay. The Takeaway talks to Jonathan Mahler author of The Challenge: Hamdan v. Rumsfeld and the Fight over Presidential Power about what this first trial means for the nation and the detainees.

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National Security: Obama's Plan for Guantanamo Bay

Thursday, May 21, 2009

This morning President Obama will deliver what the White House is calling a major national security speech. At least part of his speech will detail his plan to close the Guantanamo Bay Detention Center. But with Congressman, Senators and even FBI Director Robert Mueller lining up against the closure of Guantanamo, what can Obama possibly say? The Takeaway talks to Jonathan Mahler. He’s a contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine and author of the book The Challenge: Hamdan v. Rumsfeld and the Fight over Presidential Power.
"It's a diplomatic challenge. It's a political challenge. It's a national security challenge. And it's really an almost impossible situation for him."
—Writer Jonathan Mahler on the closing of Guantanamo Bay

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Khalid Sheikh Mohammed's last hearings at GITMO

Monday, December 08, 2008

"The CIA have admitted to waterboarding him, so you're going to have big questions about the admisability of evidence in federal courts."
— Jonathan Mahler on Khalid Sheikh Mohammed's trial

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Checks and Balances in the Post-Bush Era

Friday, November 14, 2008

Eight years of the Bush administration has caused changes in our system of checks and balances of power. Hear predictions of how the new President and a new Congress will redefine who’s in charge. Jonathan Mahler’s article in the Nov. 9 New York Times Magazine is "After the ...

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Imbalance of power

Thursday, November 06, 2008

When President-elect Barack Obama takes office in January, he'll take over a transformed executive branch with expanded power — more power than most presidents have had. New York Times magazine contributor Jonathan Mahler talks about what he sees as an imbalance of power between Washington's legislative and executive branches in his upcoming article about presidential power, called "After the Imperial Presidency."

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pentagon drops charges

Wednesday, October 22, 2008

The U.S. government has dismissed all charges against five prisoners held at Guantanamo Bay after the military prosecutor assigned to the cases resigned, saying the government had withheld evidence. Jonathan Mahler, author of "The Challenge: Hamdan v. Rumsfeld and the Fight over Presidential Power" explains what's likely to happen to the five detainees and what this means for the future of the controversial prison and court.

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Hamdan v. Rumsfeld

Monday, August 18, 2008

The Supreme Court case Hamdan v. Rumsfeld was two lawyers’ attempt to overturn the system set up to try the detainees at Guantanamo. Lt. Commander Charles Swift was one of those lawyers; he was defense counsel for detainee Salim Ahmed Hamdan, who had been Osama bin Laden's personal driver and ...

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