Streams

Jill Lepore

Professor of History at Harvard University and contributor to the New Yorker

Jill Lepore appears in the following:

The Secret History of the Man who Created Wonder Woman

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Wonder Woman's creator, William Moulton Marston, was influenced by suffragists, feminists, and centerfold pin-ups. 

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The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

Benjamin Franklin, who wrote more letters to his sister than he wrote to anyone else, was the original American self-made man; his sister spent her life caring for her 12 children. Historian Jill Lepore shows that Benjamin Franklin’s youngest sister was, like her brother, a passionate reader, a gifted writer, and an astonishingly shrewd political commentator. Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin brings Jane Franklin to life in a way that illuminates not only one woman but an entire world.

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Jill Lepore on the Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin

Tuesday, October 01, 2013

Benjamin Franklin, who wrote more letters to his sister than he wrote to anyone else, was the original American self-made man; his sister spent her life caring for her 12 children. Historian Jill Lepore shows that Benjamin Franklin’s youngest sister was, like her brother, a passionate reader, a gifted writer, and an astonishingly shrewd political commentator. Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin brings Jane Franklin to life in a way that illuminates not only one woman but an entire world.

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Guest Picks: Jill Lepore

Tuesday, October 01, 2013

Historian Jill Lepore came to the Lopate Show studios on October 1, 2013, to talk about her new book, Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin, about Benjamin Franklin's sister, Jane. She shared her guest picks with us.

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Privacy in an Age of Publicity

Thursday, June 20, 2013

Jill Lepore traces the history of privacy in America. Her article “The Prism” appears in the June 24 issue of The New Yorker.

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Transparency, Secrecy and Freedom: The History of Privacy and Democracy

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

As we learn more about the National Security Agency's secret surveillance programs and leaker Edward Snowden, The Takeaway is looking at freedom in America, and freedom's relationship to privacy. Jill Lepore, New Yorker staff writer and professor of American history at Harvard University, explores the relationship between privacy, government transparency and freedom in U.S. history.

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The World's First Political Consulting Firm

Friday, October 12, 2012

In the 1930's, married couple Clem Whitaker and Leone Baxter founded Campaigns, Inc., the world's first political consulting firm. In the ensuing 30 years, Campaigns Inc. pioneered tactics like the out-of-context quote, relentless pamphleteering, and what we now call opposition research, all techniques that are part of the modern campaign playbook. Bob talks to Jill Lepore, New Yorker contributor and author of The Story of America: Essays on Origins about Whitaker and Baxter's political legacy.

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Jill Lepore on "The Lie Factory"

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

New Yorker staff writer Jill Lepore discusses her latest article, “The Lie Factory,” about how politics became a business. Lepore is also the author of the new book The Story of America: Essays on Origins.

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American History XX: Jane Franklin Mecom

Monday, July 02, 2012

To celebrate the Independence Day we’re profiling forgotten, underappreciated, or just plain interesting American women who, in many cases, have been written out of the history books. For today’s installment of that series, American History XX, The New Yorker’s Jill Lepore fills us in on the life of Jane Franklin Mecom, Ben Franklin’s sister whom he corresponded with often, but eventually wrote out of his own autobiography.

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Mansion of Happiness

Thursday, June 14, 2012

Jill Lepore, professor of American History at Harvard University and staff writer at The New Yorker, discusses her new book, The Mansion of Happiness: A History of Life and Death, a history of American ideas about life and death from before the cradle to beyond the grave.

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Jill Lepore on the End of It All

Wednesday, June 06, 2012

When does life begin? When does it end? In the political climate of the twenty-first century, as candidates spar over abortion and death panels, everyone seems to have a different opinion. History tells a different story. The answer to life’s questions used to be easy. Early Americans imagined their lives to be ruled by destiny, by the whims of a puritanical God. Fast-forward a few decades, and the picture grows much more complicated.

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Past and Present With Jill Lepore

Monday, July 04, 2011

Jill Lepore, professor of American history at Harvard, staff writer at The New Yorker and author of The Whites of Their Eyes: The Tea Party’s Revolution and the Battle Over American History, discusses how four past historical moments have influenced the present political and social climate in the United States: the death of newspapers in 1765, the Karen Ann Quinlan right-to-die case of 1975, the Parrot Fever panic of 1930, and Clarence Darrow's defense in the 1898 right-to-strike case. 

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Past and Present with Jill Lepore: Darrow and Labor Rights

Thursday, May 26, 2011

Jill Lepore, professor of American history at Harvard, staff writer at The New Yorker and author of The Whites of Their Eyes: The Tea Party’s Revolution and the Battle Over American History, concludes her stint as our weekly guest for the month of May. She will discuss how four past historical moments have influenced the present political and social climate in the United States.

Today's historical moment: The 1898 right to strike case and Clarence Darrow's defense.

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Past and Present with Jill Lepore: Parrot Fever Panic of 1930

Thursday, May 19, 2011

Jill Lepore, professor of American history at Harvard, staff writer at The New Yorker and author of The Whites of Their Eyes: The Tea Party’s Revolution and the Battle Over American History, continues her stint as our weekly guest for the month of May. She will discuss how four past historical moments have influenced the present political and social climate in the United States.

Today's historical moment: The Parrot Fever Panic of 1930

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Past and Present With Jill Lepore: The Politics of Death

Thursday, May 12, 2011

Jill Lepore, professor of American history at Harvard, staff writer at The New Yorker and author of The Whites of Their Eyes: The Tea Party’s Revolution and the Battle Over American History, is our weekly guest for the month of May. She will discuss how four past historical moments have influenced the present political and social climate in the United States.

Today's historical moment: The Karen Ann Quinlan right-to-die case of 1975.

Comments [4]

Past and Present With Jill Lepore: The 1765 Death of Newspapers

Wednesday, May 04, 2011

Jill Lepore, professor of American history at Harvard, staff writer at The New Yorker and author of The Whites of Their Eyes: The Tea Party’s Revolution and the Battle Over American History, is our weekly guest for the month of May. She will discuss how four past historical moments have influenced the present political and social climate in the United States.

Today's historical moment: The death of newspapers in 1765.

Comments [2]

Backstory: The Second Amendment

Thursday, January 13, 2011

The shooting in Arizona that resulted in the death of 6 people and the injury of 14 others, including Representative Gabrielle Giffords, has prompted a new round of soul-searching about one of the most contentious topics in American politics: gun-control. Both Representative Peter King (R-NY) and Representative Carolyn McCarthy (D-NY) have announced intentions to introduce new gun control legislation in Congress, but many the powerful National Rifle Association (NRA) lobby maintains that the right to bear arms is enshrined in the Bill of Rights and should not to be changed. Harvard University History Professor and New Yorker contributor Jill Lepore explains that the 2nd amendment was not always interpreted as the right to bear arms in the literal sense. She'll trace the history of this contentious amendment through its drafting to the present--and, along the way, will explain how the right to bear arms is inextricably linked with the unique way in which murders have been carried out on American soil.

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The Big Picture: Jill Lepore and Matt Taibbi

Wednesday, November 03, 2010

For the final installment of our election series The Big Picture, contributing editor for Rolling Stone Matt Taibbi and New Yorker staff writer Jill Lepore discuss the results of Election Day—what happened at the polls, who won and who lost, and the state of the country. Taibbi’s new book Griftopia: Bubble Machines, Vampire Squids, and the Long Con That Is Breaking America, unravels the story of financial crisis. Lepore’s new book The Whites of Their Eyes: The Tea Party's Revolution and the Battle over American History looks at American history according to the far right.

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Speeches of Inaugurations Past

Monday, January 19, 2009

Before Calvin Coolidge’s 1925 inaugural speech was broadcast via radio, inaugurals were usually only read in the newspaper. We look at inaugural speeches of the past, how they’ve evolved, and what tends to make a speech successful or not. Jill Lepore’s article in the Jan. 12, 2009 New Yorker

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Historical Romance

Monday, January 05, 2009

We discuss literary trends of the 18th century. Jane Kamensky and Jill Lepore’s new novel, Blindspot, is a sendup of historical romance set in 1764 in Boston.

Event:
Jane Kamensky and Jill Lepre will be reading and signing books
Mon. Jan. 5 at 7 PM
...

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