Streams

Farai Chideya

Political Contributor

Farai Chideya appears in the following:

A Talk with the Pay "Overseer": What's Fair?

Thursday, June 11, 2009

The Obama administration has announced the appointment of a compensation czar who will regulate executive pay at seven of the largest companies getting TARP (Troubled Asset Relief Program) funds. He will also develop a compensation structure for 80 smaller companies. The man who is taking on that job is Kenneth Feinberg, a Washington, D.C. attorney who was in charge of the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund. He joins The Takeaway to tell us about his plans. (Click through to read the interview.)

"Let everybody know exactly what we're doing, why we're making these decisions, why we feel they're the right decisions, and let the public then decide for themselves with full disclosure." — Compensation overseer Kenneth Feinberg

Comments [1]

Is Iran's Ahmadinejad Getting Desperate?

Thursday, June 11, 2009

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad wrapped up his re-election campaign by accusing his opponents of conspiring with Israelis to discredit him. He went on TV to denounce them for lying, insulting him and being corrupt. The BBC's Jon Leyne is in Tehran to review the Iranian campaign and predict how fair or free the vote will be.

For more on Ahmadinejad and the Iranian elections, watch the video below.

Comment

How Gentrification Changes a City

Thursday, June 11, 2009

In the past 50 years, Denver has grown from a small city to a sprawling metropolitan region. With urban sprawl comes gentrification. The Takeaway caught up with Andres Duany, the founding member of the New Urbanism movement, to ask him about gentrification. How do you keep a neighborhood mixed, economically and socially?

Also, hear this bonus web-only interview we did with Duany on urban sprawl!

Comment

Waiting for the Train: A City Safari in Denver

Thursday, June 11, 2009

This week The Takeaway is examining Denver as a laboratory for how the American city and surrounding suburbs are changing. The so-called "new urbanists" are pushing for more walkable, mixed-use (and mixed price) communities. They are gathering in Denver this week for the Congress on New Urbanism.

Matt Dellinger, transportation writer, joins The Takeaway to talk about who he's met and what he's learned while on safari in downtown Denver.

Follow along on The Takeaway's Urban Safari series.

Comments [1]

You Call This a Government? The Mess in Albany

Thursday, June 11, 2009

On Monday New York State Senate Republicans staged a coup against the Democratic majority. In response, the Democrats refused to unlock the gates to the Senate chamber, and state business has come to a standstill. Rex Smith, Editor of the Albany Times-Union, joins The Takeaway with a look at the New York state government's chaos.

Watch footage from the floor of the Senate in the video below.

Comment

The Pay Czar: Setting the Pay Scale for Executives

Thursday, June 11, 2009

In response to criticism of outlandish executive pay, the government is now tightening the reins. Yesterday, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner announced the brand new position of "pay czar" and appointed Ken Feinberg, the Washington lawyer known for setting the compensation amount for families of the 9/11 victims. Now he turns his attention to setting a very different kind of monetary figure. To talk about this is Nell Minow, editor and co-founder of the Corporate Library, a think-tank that studies executive pay.

"Banking is different than many other industries in that the government is really compelled. It doesn't have an option. It's compelled to bail out the banks when they get in trouble or the whole economy and society collapse."
— Business professor Peter Morici

Comments [1]

Say Hello to the Millionth English Word

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

The English language is a rich and wondrous thing and just got its millionth word: Web-2.0. Global Language Monitor, which searches the internet for new words, claims that that is a word: it's been used 25,000 times, the GLM's standard for recognition. The firm says a new word is born on average every 98 minutes. Joining us from London is Lawrence Pollard, BBC Arts Correspondent.

Comment

Battle of the Brands: Do Attack Ads Work?

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

Consumers are spending less money, so companies are using increasingly aggressive advertising techniques to compete for dwindling dollars. Does bashing your competitors help or hurt? Advertising consultant Cindy Gallop joins The Takeaway to describe the fierce ad climate.

"It's the brands that project the most confidence in themselves that can sell themselves on their own merits, and not attack the competition, that will ultimately succeed."
— Advertising consultant Cindy Gallop on advertising in the recession

This Domino's commercial is an example of the battle of the brands. Take a look.

Comment

Menthol Cigarettes: An Issue of Health—and Race

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

Today the Senate is likely to pass a bill allowing the FDA to regulate tobacco. A similar measure passed the House in April. The bill bans all kinds of flavored cigarettes except menthol, which are disproportionately smoked by African Americans. Representative Donna Christensen, chair of the Congressional Black Caucus’ Health Braintrust, and Bill Robinson, Executive Director of the National African American Tobacco Prevention Network, join John and Farai with a look at how the bill may affect the health of African-Americans.

Comment

Oil Prices, the Stock Market and Your Pocketbook

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

The price of oil has risen to just over $71 dollars a barrel, which is a high point for the year. This is good news for a global commodity that has seen its prices drop by 100 percent in the past three months. But the price increase could hit American's pocketbooks hard. Mark Gregory, international business reporter for our partners the BBC, joins us with his analysis.

Comment

A Step to Closing Guantanamo? A Detainee in New York

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

The first detainee from Guantanamo Bay prison to face civilian trial in the U.S. pleaded "not guilty" in a New York court on Tuesday. Ahmed Ghailani is charged with helping to coordinate the bombing of U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania. The transfer and trial of this detainee is viewed as an important step in the Obama administration’s plan to close Guantanamo Bay. The Takeaway talks to Jonathan Mahler author of The Challenge: Hamdan v. Rumsfeld and the Fight over Presidential Power about what this first trial means for the nation and the detainees.

Comment

Uighur Detainees Put Palau on the Map

Wednesday, June 10, 2009


View Larger Map

The tiny South Pacific island state of Palau has agreed to temporarily resettle 17 Chinese Muslims being held in Guantanamo Bay prison. The men are ethnic Uighurs from China's north-western Xinjiang province; they were cleared for release four years ago by U.S. authorities but have had nowhere to go. They can't be returned to China for fear they'd be mistreated and their resettlement in the U.S. faced fierce political opposition. Palau's current President, Johnson Toribong, said his country was “honored and proud” to take the detainees. We speak to Palau’s former president Tommy Remengesau, who stepped down in January, about the island's decision.

(Click through for transcript)

"It’s the long-term ramifications. What is the view of the very people we’re trying to invite to Palau as tourists? What will they think of Palau if they know that we are hosting Guantanamo Bay detainees?"
— Former Palau president Tommy Remengesau on the hosting of Guantanamo Bay detainees

Comment

Score! The NBA and NHL Finals with Ibrahim Abdul-Matin

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

In hockey and basketball, the finals continue. The Pittsburgh Penguins grabbed a 2-to-1 victory over Detroit on the ice, forcing a Game 7 in the NHL's Stanley Cup finals. Meanwhile in the NBA, Orlando finally found its Magic touch, winning 108-104 over the Lakers last night. They'll face off in Game 4 on Thursday. We’re getting all the details — and predictions — from The Takeaway sports contributor Ibrahim Abdul-Matin.

Watch highlights from Game 6 of the hockey final in the video below.

Comment

Pakistani-Americans Keeping an Eye on the Swat Valley

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

Pakistan's Swat Valley has gone from a popular summer vacation destination to a place of horror. An estimated two million people have been displaced as the Pakistani army battles Taliban militants in Swat, while Pakistani immigrants in America watch the situation anxiously. The Takeaway is taking the pulse of the Pakistani-American community with Mohammed Razvi. He’s the Executive Director of the Council of People’s Organization, a nonprofit organization serving the South Asian Community.

Comment

Taking on the Taliban

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

Yesterday a suicide bombing at a luxury hotel in northwestern Pakistan killed 11 people in what the U.N. condemned as a "heinous terrorist attack." In response to such acts, Pakistani villagers are taking up arms against the Taliban in what's being described as a grassroots rebellion. Yesterday the Pakistani army launched a major offensive to support the grassroots rebellion. Joining us now from Pakistan is Chris Morris, the BBC's South Asia correspondent Islamabad who has been covering this ongoing fight.

Comment

We Have A Winner! Deeds Wins Va. Governor Primary

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

State Senator R. Creigh Deeds won Virginia's three-way Democratic primary for governor Tuesday. Deeds’ win over former Democratic National Committee chairman Terry McAuliffe was something of a surprise. What is the political future of this "purple" state? The Takeaway talks to Beverly Amsler, morning anchor for WVTF radio in Roanoke, Virginia.

Comment

I Will Not Repeat My Crime, I Will Not Repeat My Crime

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

White-collar criminals tend to receive different sentences from violent offenders, but a judge in New York gave a guilty executive a really different sentence. He required the former senior vice president to write a book about the nature of his crime. And this isn't a first for the judge: he also made a lobbyist write a tome on his offenses. Judge Ricardo Urbina of the U.S. District Court in Washington joins us this morning to explain his take on justice, restitution, and reform. Judge Urbina is also the judge who ordered the Bush administration to release the 17 Uighurs held at Guantanamo in October of last year. We talked with Judge Urbina about this morning's news that the small Pacific island nation of Palau will resettle these 17 Uigurs.

Comment

City of the Future? Denver's New Urbanism

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

This week The Takeaway looks at how cities are reinventing themselves for a world that doesn't depend on cars. Transportation writer (and Takeaway Contributor) Matt Dellinger is in Denver, CO, a town that has epitomized American urban sprawl. But Denver wants to reinvent itself and as the host city for the Congress on New Urbanism, the city is well on its way to streamlining its infrastructure. Also joining the conversation is Denver Mayor John Hickenlooper, to discuss how his city is reshaping itself.

Above is the 3-minute video that won the Congress for the New Urbanism's 2009 video contest. It's called "Built to Last" and it is from filmmakers First + Main Media from Julian, CA and Paget Films from Buffalo, NY (John Paget, Dr. Chris Elisara, and Drew Ward).

Follow along on The Takeaway's Urban Safari series.

Comments [1]

Don't Ask, Don't Tell — Except in Britain

Tuesday, June 09, 2009

The U.S. Supreme Court said Monday that it will not review the Pentagon's controversial "Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell" policy, which requires U.S. service members to keep their sexual orientation under wraps. In 2000, the UK armed forces integrated gay and lesbian service members nearly overnight with some surprising results. The Takeaway talks to Retired Lieutenant Commander Craig Jones of the British Royal Navy. He was a fierce advocate of British military integration.

Comments [1]

Free Care for Kids: Can Shriners' Hospitals Be Saved?

Tuesday, June 09, 2009

In 22 cities around the country, Shriners' Hospitals for Children provide top-of-the-line care to anyone under the age of 18 for absolutely free—they accept no government funding or insurance payments. But the organization's endowment has been devastated by the economic crisis, and the membership is voting in early July on a proposal to close six hospitals. Parents of patients at the threatened hospitals are signing petitions and holding fundraisers to try and save the hospitals. Bob Houden, spokesperson for the Shriners Hospital in Erie, Pennsylvania, which could be closed, and Laura Marinucci, the parent of a Shriners patient who founded Save our Shriners, join The Takeaway to talk about this potential latest casualty of the recession.

Comment