Streams

Farai Chideya

Political Contributor

Farai Chideya appears in the following:

A Preview of Sotomayor's Confirmation Hearings

Monday, July 13, 2009

Today the Senate Judiciary Committee kicks off confirmation hearings for Judge Sonia Sotomayor. She is President Obama's first appointment to the U.S. Supreme Court, and if she is confirmed she will make history as the first Hispanic on the high court. Joining us for a preview of the confirmation process is Dahlia Lithwick. She is the senior legal correspondent for Slate and joins us from Washington, DC.

"There's not much on the record that's going to hurt her. She really is, like it or not, a pretty pedestrian moderate, technical, mainstream, fairly moderate liberal judge. She's basically David Souter."
—Dahlia Lithwick, senior legal correspondent for Slate, on Sonia Sotomayor

For more on Sonia Sotomayor, watch the video below.

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Sotomayor's Senate Confirmation Hearings Begin

Monday, July 13, 2009

Today is opening day of Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor. The Takeaway talks to Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich on what to expect. (Todd will tweet live from the hearings, so follow them on TheTakeaway's Twitter feed.)

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Remembering the King of Pop

Friday, June 26, 2009

Michael Jackson, the King of Pop, died yesterday afternoon at the age of 50. Details of his death will not be known until a full autopsy is done. But what we do know is the legacy he has left behind. His career spanned over 40 years, and his musical importance ranks with Sinatra, Elvis and the Beatles.

Joining us in remembering the King of Pop are Chuck D from legendary hip hop group Public Enemy, Brian Raftery, Contributing Writer for SPIN Magazine, and, Farai Chideya, journalist and friend of The Takeaway.

"I think of Michael Jackson as a brilliant artist and entertainer, and all those other issues about the plastic surgery or the child molestation, they're irrelevant to me."
— Chuck D. on Michael Jackson

Click through for a transcript.

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[Web Special] Michael and the American Imagination

Friday, June 26, 2009

Just months after our President proved that you can be born black in America and achieve the highest heights, the life of Michael Jackson offers a very different narrative: he is someone whose cultural legacy shaped his success, but did not provide a path to inner peace.

Michael Jackson seemed crushed under a weight of identity: black, man, star, brother, father and son. Add philanthropist, media-victim and manipulator, accused pederast, primate owner, fashionista and dancer. Owner of, and now perhaps a returnee to, Neverland.

Back in 2003, I wrote a piece asking what happened to the brownskinned boy who stole my heart and those of girls my age across the world. Why did he shed his color, and the sincerity of his smile? Continue reading ...

Read More

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U.S. and China Heat Up the Global-Warming Debate

Friday, June 12, 2009

Top climate change officials from China and the U.S. met this week in Beijing to hash out a pre-Copenhagen plan for cutting greenhouse gas. The two countries are the world’s top two greenhouse gas emitters, according to the Brookings Institution. Together, they account for more than 40 percent of annual emissions. Any solution to the greenhouse gas problem may require both countries to transition to low-carbon economies.

Just back from a trip to China is Assistant Energy Secretary David Sandalow, who joins The Takeaway to discuss how talks are going. Click through for the full transcript of the interview.

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Stanley Cup: Will the Red Wings Cheer Up Detroit?

Friday, June 12, 2009

With the auto industry in crisis, Detroit residents are looking to their NHL team, the Red Wings, to bring a smile to their city. Tonight the Red Wings battle the Pittsburgh Penguins for hockey's Stanley Cup. The Takeaway talks to Red Wings fans Michele Rastelli and Jason Dritsan about the city's hopes for a win.

Highlights from Game 6:

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Urban Planning and the Environment

Friday, June 12, 2009

For the last twenty five years, America has built-up the suburbs. But now Americans are beginning to rethink whether these communities are environmentally sustainable. Joining The Takeaway is James Howard Kunstler, one of the urban thinkers gathering in Denver this week for the Congress for New Urbanism. He’s the author of "The Long Emergency: Surviving the Converging Catastrophes of the 21st Century."

"We have a railroad system at every level in this country that the Bulgarians would be ashamed of. We have to do better. And if we don't we're not going to be going anywhere."
— Author James Howard Kunstler on changing the American landscape

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South Africa: HIV Infections May Be Declining At Last

Friday, June 12, 2009

The news out of South Africa this week indicates there's something for the HIV-stricken country to celebrate. A new report says that HIV infections among young teens are down. In addition, the Western Cape is seeing fewer transmissions because more males are using condoms, and in the last three years the number of HIV infections has stabilized. Is the march of HIV slowing down?

The Takeaway is joined by Dr. Ernest Darkoh, a global health expert known for revolutionizing Botswana's HIV treatment program, to deconstruct the data. Click through for the full transcript of the interview.

Also, check out some intriguing data visualizations of HIV infection rates plotted against life expectancy, from gapminder.org.

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Social Media in Iran Elections

Friday, June 12, 2009

Iran’s media operate under the tight control of a special government court. But many Iranian voters are turning to social media technology to express their views and debate political ideas.

Pooria Jafereh, a journalist with BBC Monitoring, a service of the BBC that listens to media in different countries, joins The Takeaway with a look at the influence of media on this election. We also speak to Afshin Molavi, Senior Fellow at the New America Foundation and author of “Soul of Iran: A Nation’s Journey to Freedom." Also joining the discussion is Shappi Khorsandi, a stand-up comedian and author of "A Beginner's Guide to Acting English," to talk about the comedic aspects of Iranian politics.

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In Australia, a Rise in Attacks on Indian Students

Friday, June 12, 2009

Demonstrators are protesting in Sydney and Melbourne, Australia, where dozens of assaults against Indian students have been reported in the past year. Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd says any racist attacks are “deplorable.” Gautam Gupta, a student who was attacked, says the authorities have been too slow to respond, so he’s set up the Federation of Indian Students of Australia to protect Indian students. He joins The Takeaway from Melbourne to talk about the rise in ethnic tensions.

Watch footage from the protests below.

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Summer Movies: "The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3"

Friday, June 12, 2009

The latest summer blockbuster, which opens today, features a train in a starring role. It’s a remake of the 1974 film "The Taking of Pelham One Two Three," which starred Walter Matthau and the New York City subway. The New York Times film critic A.O. Scott offers his takeaway on the 2009 remake of "The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3." (This one stars Denzel Washington and John Travolta.)

Watch the trailer for the 2009 take on "Pelham" below.

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Denver's Design for the Future: The "New Suburbia"

Friday, June 12, 2009

In Denver, Colorado, a group of urban planners and architects gather this week to debate urban design. How can suburbia and downtown get closer? Joining The Takeaway from Denver is Ellen Dunham, the Director of the Architecture program at Georgia Institute of Technology and the co-author of "Retrofitting Suburbia: Urban Design Solutions for Redesigning Suburbs".

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Riding the Rails: Upgrading Transportation in Denver

Friday, June 12, 2009

Like many cities, Denver is struggling to connect its suburbs to its downtown, and to create a new kind of city center. Continuing our series on the New Urbanism, The Takeaway talks to Matt Dellinger. He talks about the city's light rail project and the attempt to design and define new communities.

Follow along on The Takeaway's Urban Safari series.

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Ideology or the Economy? Iranians Head to the Polls

Friday, June 12, 2009

It’s election day in Iran. President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad is facing a tough challenge from Mir Hossein Mousavi, a moderate former prime minister. Outsiders may see this as an ideological choice for Iranians, but in fact there are basic pocketbook issues at stake. The economy is in serious trouble, with unemployment at 17 percent and inflation over 23 percent, according to Iran’s Central Bank. Joining The Takeaway to take a look at the election are Afshin Molavi, a Senior Fellow at the New America Foundation, and author of “Soul of Iran: A Nation’s Journey to Freedom,” and Radman Rabii, a Mousavi supporter.

"These elections have exposed serious rifts within the ruling leadership, but they've also excited the public like no other election before."
— Afshin Molavi, senior fellow at the New America Foundation, on Iranian elections

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Holocaust Museum Shooter: A History of Hate

Thursday, June 11, 2009

An 88-year-old white supremacist walked into the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. yesterday with a rifle, fatally shooting a security guard. The alleged shooter, James von Brunn, is believed to have a long history of anti-Semitic beliefs.

Joining The Takeaway is a man whose organization tracks threats and attacks by hate groups, Mark Potok, Director of the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Intelligence Project.

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Hate Crimes: The Holocaust Museum Shooting

Thursday, June 11, 2009

An 88-year-old white supremacist with a rifle walked into the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, fatally wounding a security guard. The gunman was identified by law enforcement officials as James W. von Brunn, who embraces conspiracy theories involving Jews, blacks and other minority groups and has waged a personal war with the federal government. Jack Levin, Professor of Sociology and Criminology at Northeastern University joins The Takeaway to talk about the shooting and the trends in hate crimes.

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The Human Cost of Zimbabwe's Troubles

Thursday, June 11, 2009

The Prime Minister of Zimbabwe, Morgan Tvangirai, is in Washington this week to meet with President Obama. He’s here to garner support for Zimbabwe’s power-sharing “Unity” government. What's the real state of the country, politically and economically? The BBC Mike Thomson has just returned from an undercover reporting trip to the country, and joins The Takeaway to talk about Zimbabwe's troubles, and the orphans who suffer the price.

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Is Obama's Body Language Friendly or a Power Play?

Thursday, June 11, 2009

When Obama meets with top leaders and government officials, he often puts an arm around their shoulders. To some, this could be seen as a friendly gesture, but to others it's a power play. What does a politician's body language really mean? Joining The Takeaway to decipher this for us is Karen Studd, a teacher of movement analysis at the Laban Institute of Movement Studies, who is an Associate Professor of Dance at George Mason University.

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An Experiment in Teacher Pay: $125,000 Starting Salary

Thursday, June 11, 2009

The average salary for middle-school teachers is $46,000, according to the Department of Labor. But a charter school in New York’s Washington Heights will be paying a salary of $125,000, trying to find out if better pay means a better education. Zeke Vanderhoek, the founder and principal of the charter school The Equity Project (TEP) joins The Takeaway to talk about the school. The Takeaway also has Joe Williams, Executive Director of Democrats for Education Reform, to talk about whether paying teachers a high salary would improve public schools in the long run.

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A Talk with the Pay "Overseer": What's Fair?

Thursday, June 11, 2009

The Obama administration has announced the appointment of a compensation czar who will regulate executive pay at seven of the largest companies getting TARP (Troubled Asset Relief Program) funds. He will also develop a compensation structure for 80 smaller companies. The man who is taking on that job is Kenneth Feinberg, a Washington, D.C. attorney who was in charge of the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund. He joins The Takeaway to tell us about his plans. (Click through to read the interview.)

"Let everybody know exactly what we're doing, why we're making these decisions, why we feel they're the right decisions, and let the public then decide for themselves with full disclosure." — Compensation overseer Kenneth Feinberg

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