Streams

Farai Chideya

Political Contributor

Farai Chideya appears in the following:

Buy Me Some Crackerjack! It's Baseball's All-Star Game

Tuesday, July 14, 2009

The Takeaway previews Major League Baseball's All-Star game with Takeaway sports contributor Ibrahim Abdul-Matin. The game in St. Louis tonight sees the National League trying to beat the American League for the first time in 13 years. President Barack Obama will be throwing out the first ball before joining former Presidents George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, George H.W. Bush and Jimmy Carter in a video address to be aired during the pre-game ceremony.

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Sotomayor: Grilling the 'Wise Latina'

Tuesday, July 14, 2009

Yesterday was the first day of Sonia Sotomayor's confirmation hearings. Today the senators will get their chance to challenge the nominee on her rulings, speeches, and judicial philosophy. The Takeaway's Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich joins us with a look at the highlights.

If you missed Sonia Sotomayor's opening statement, here it is:

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Damned If You Do: Profiting in a Recession

Tuesday, July 14, 2009

While much of America remains mired in a recession, Goldman Sachs is booming. The investment bank just paid back the $10 billion loan it took from the federal government last year and today Goldman is expected to announce a $2 billion dollar profit in its second quarter earnings report. How did Goldman go from bust to boom so quickly? Joining The Takeaway with their analysis are Matt Taibbi, a contributing editor to Rolling Stone, who wrote a scathing article on Goldman's practices, and Graham Bowley, a financial reporter for The New York Times. Graham's article on Goldman's expected earnings set off a market buying frenzy.

For more, read Matt Taibbi's article Inside the Great American Bubble Machine, in Rolling Stone. Also, read Graham Bowley's article, For Goldman, a Swift Return to Lofty Profits, in The New York Times.

"The entire Wall Street knows that this bank isn't going to go under because the government just isn't going to allow it."
—Matt Taibbi of Rolling Stone on the high earnings of Goldman Sachs

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Marking the NAACPs Centennial Convention

Monday, July 13, 2009

The NAACP has gathered in New York for a six-day convention celebrating its 100-year anniversary. It’s an enormous affair with giants such as Cornel West, Reverend Jesse Jackson, and President Obama paying tribute to the accomplishments of the civil rights organization. The civil rights group was formed by a multi-racial coalition in 1909, sparked in 1908 by a deadly race riot in Springfield Illinois. Nearly a century later, Barack Obama launched his presidential campaign not far from where the riot took place. Looking at the challenges ahead and its past accomplishments we are joined by Melissa Harris-Lacewell. She is an Associate Professor of Politics and African American Studies at Princeton University.

Read about what was life was like for black Americans in 1909.

"Every civil rights organization ultimately wants to die. Because the goal is to have full equality. And if you have full equality then your institutional purpose is no longer important."
—Melissa Harris Lacewell on the anniversary of the NAACP

The Takeaway will be covering the convention all week long. Tomorrow we continue the conversation with the artists' take on the NAACP’s legacy. We’ll be joined by musical sensation DJ Spooky and poet Elizabeth Alexander.

 

 

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A Sherpa's View: Surviving the Congressional Hearings

Monday, July 13, 2009

As Judge Sonia Sotomayor takes the stand at the confirmation hearings this week, there's a lot of behind-the-scenes prepping. A "Sherpa"--named after local mountain guides who take foreign explorers up the Himalayas -- helps to guide Supreme Court nominees to the summit of gaining Senate confirmation. Joining The Takeaway is Jamie Brown, the Sherpa behind the confirmation of the last two successful Supreme Court nominations, Samuel Alito and Chief Justice John Roberts. She was also formerly a legislative affairs aid for the White House under President George W. Bush.

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A Talk with GM's Bob Lutz: New Cars, New Goals

Monday, July 13, 2009

On Friday General Motors emerged from bankruptcy after only forty days in Chapter 11. Now they’re trying to project the image of the “new” GM. What new cars will they roll out—and what are the company's chances of actually making a profit? Joining The Takeaway from Detroit is Bob Lutz, GM’s Vice Chairman. Lutz began his career in the auto industry in 1963 and he’s in charge of brands, marketing, advertising and communications for GM.

"Our goal is to get back to being a wholly-privately-owned company in two or three years — at the latest four years. And that's the government's goal too."
—GM vice-chairman Bob Lutz on the state of the company


Click through for a transcript of our discussion with Bob Lutz.

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Judging Against Sonia Sotomayor

Monday, July 13, 2009

The Takeaway talks to Nicholas Quinn Rosenkranz. He’s a professor of law at Georgetown University –and he’s a testifying against Judge Sonia Sotomayor at the Senate confirmation hearings this week.

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Cheney's Secret Program: Was It Constitutional?

Monday, July 13, 2009

To talk about Dick Cheney's CIA counter-terrorism program and the rights of the Executive Branch and Congress is Laurence Tribe, Carl M. Loeb University Professor at Harvard Law School.

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Cheney's CIA Secret Anti-Terror Program

Monday, July 13, 2009

Former Vice President Dick Cheney ordered the CIA to withhold information from Congress for eight years regarding a secret counter-terrorism program. C.I.A. director Leon Panetta told the Senate and House intelligence committees back in June about this and immediately put an end to the program. The program never became fully operational but details of it still remain classified. Joining The Takeaway is The New York Times National Security Reporter, Scott Shane.

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Are Kids Naturally Racist?

Monday, July 13, 2009

Every Monday, The Takeaway focuses on the family. Today, author Jeremy Adam Smith joins us to talk about his young son and discuss the provocative question of whether parents unconsciously raise kids to be racists. He is the author of “Daddy Shift: How Stay-at-Home Dads, Breadwinning Moms, and Shared Parenting Are Transforming the American Family."

Click through for a transcript of this interview.

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Geting to Know Sotomayor

Monday, July 13, 2009

Today the confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Judge Sonia Sotomayor begin. To find out more about the nominee, we talk to Margarita Rosa, the Executive Director of Grand Street Settlement in New York who first met Sonia Sotomayor when they were undergrads at Princeton. We are also joined by Ellen Chapnick, Dean of the Social Justice Program at Columbia Law School and a Lecturer–in-Law. She co-taught a class with Sonia Sotomayor and has known her since the late 1990’s.

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This Week's Agenda with Marcus Mabry and Jonathan Marcus

Monday, July 13, 2009

This week in The Takeaway's Monday agenda: the Senate confirmation hearings of Sonia Sotomayor, the health care debate continues, bank earnings out this week may cause some controversy and Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner is in Europe and the Middle East. The Takeaway is joined by Marcus Mabry, the International Business Editor for The New York Times. Also joining the show is the BBC's Diplomatic Correspondent Jonathan Marcus.

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Tales of a Traveling First Family

Monday, July 13, 2009

The Obamas arrived back home this weekend after a two-week trip through Europe and Africa. Michelle Obama with her mom and two kids joined the president in Moscow, and from there went to Italy and Ghana. While the president's schedule was widely publicized, The Takeaway looks at what the rest of the family was up to. Lynn Sweet, who writes the column The Daily Flotus for Politics Daily and is Washington Bureau Chief for the Chicago Sun-Times, talks about what the first family did on the trip.

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A Preview of Sotomayor's Confirmation Hearings

Monday, July 13, 2009

Today the Senate Judiciary Committee kicks off confirmation hearings for Judge Sonia Sotomayor. She is President Obama's first appointment to the U.S. Supreme Court, and if she is confirmed she will make history as the first Hispanic on the high court. Joining us for a preview of the confirmation process is Dahlia Lithwick. She is the senior legal correspondent for Slate and joins us from Washington, DC.

"There's not much on the record that's going to hurt her. She really is, like it or not, a pretty pedestrian moderate, technical, mainstream, fairly moderate liberal judge. She's basically David Souter."
—Dahlia Lithwick, senior legal correspondent for Slate, on Sonia Sotomayor

For more on Sonia Sotomayor, watch the video below.

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Sotomayor's Senate Confirmation Hearings Begin

Monday, July 13, 2009

Today is opening day of Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor. The Takeaway talks to Washington Correspondent Todd Zwillich on what to expect. (Todd will tweet live from the hearings, so follow them on TheTakeaway's Twitter feed.)

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Remembering the King of Pop

Friday, June 26, 2009

Michael Jackson, the King of Pop, died yesterday afternoon at the age of 50. Details of his death will not be known until a full autopsy is done. But what we do know is the legacy he has left behind. His career spanned over 40 years, and his musical importance ranks with Sinatra, Elvis and the Beatles.

Joining us in remembering the King of Pop are Chuck D from legendary hip hop group Public Enemy, Brian Raftery, Contributing Writer for SPIN Magazine, and, Farai Chideya, journalist and friend of The Takeaway.

"I think of Michael Jackson as a brilliant artist and entertainer, and all those other issues about the plastic surgery or the child molestation, they're irrelevant to me."
— Chuck D. on Michael Jackson

Click through for a transcript.

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[Web Special] Michael and the American Imagination

Friday, June 26, 2009

Just months after our President proved that you can be born black in America and achieve the highest heights, the life of Michael Jackson offers a very different narrative: he is someone whose cultural legacy shaped his success, but did not provide a path to inner peace.

Michael Jackson seemed crushed under a weight of identity: black, man, star, brother, father and son. Add philanthropist, media-victim and manipulator, accused pederast, primate owner, fashionista and dancer. Owner of, and now perhaps a returnee to, Neverland.

Back in 2003, I wrote a piece asking what happened to the brownskinned boy who stole my heart and those of girls my age across the world. Why did he shed his color, and the sincerity of his smile? Continue reading ...

Read More

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U.S. and China Heat Up the Global-Warming Debate

Friday, June 12, 2009

Top climate change officials from China and the U.S. met this week in Beijing to hash out a pre-Copenhagen plan for cutting greenhouse gas. The two countries are the world’s top two greenhouse gas emitters, according to the Brookings Institution. Together, they account for more than 40 percent of annual emissions. Any solution to the greenhouse gas problem may require both countries to transition to low-carbon economies.

Just back from a trip to China is Assistant Energy Secretary David Sandalow, who joins The Takeaway to discuss how talks are going. Click through for the full transcript of the interview.

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Stanley Cup: Will the Red Wings Cheer Up Detroit?

Friday, June 12, 2009

With the auto industry in crisis, Detroit residents are looking to their NHL team, the Red Wings, to bring a smile to their city. Tonight the Red Wings battle the Pittsburgh Penguins for hockey's Stanley Cup. The Takeaway talks to Red Wings fans Michele Rastelli and Jason Dritsan about the city's hopes for a win.

Highlights from Game 6:

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Urban Planning and the Environment

Friday, June 12, 2009

For the last twenty five years, America has built-up the suburbs. But now Americans are beginning to rethink whether these communities are environmentally sustainable. Joining The Takeaway is James Howard Kunstler, one of the urban thinkers gathering in Denver this week for the Congress for New Urbanism. He’s the author of "The Long Emergency: Surviving the Converging Catastrophes of the 21st Century."

"We have a railroad system at every level in this country that the Bulgarians would be ashamed of. We have to do better. And if we don't we're not going to be going anywhere."
— Author James Howard Kunstler on changing the American landscape

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