Streams

Dylan Mattingly

Composer

A native of Berkeley, California, Dylan Mattingly (born 1991) began playing cello when he was 5 years old and wrote his first composition at the age of 7. He currently studies composition at the Bard College Conservatory of Music with George Tsontakis, Joan Tower, and Kyle Gann. His music has been performed in Sydney, Berlin, New York, San Francisco, and numerous other cities around the world. He has studied conducting with David Ramadanoff and Nathan Madsen, and has worked with David Tcimpidis, Yiorgos Vassilandonakis, Katrina Wreede, and John Adams, taking part, as well, in the John Adams Young Composer's Program.

His work has been influenced alike by John Adams, Olivier Messiaen, Magnus Lindberg, Joni Mitchell, the old American blues and folk field recordings of the Lomaxes, and the giants of post-Partch American microtonality such as Ben Johnston and James Tenney. For two years he was the co-director of Formerly Known as Classical, a San Francisco Bay Area new music ensemble whose young members play only music written in their lifetimes, and he is now the co-artistic director and co-founder of Contemporaneous, a New York new music ensemble. He performs frequently as a cellist, bassist, pianist, guitarist, and singer.

Mattingly is also a painter, playwright, and a pitcher for Bard College's club baseball team. In the past he has played cello in an improv string quartet called the Superdelegates and was guitarist and vocalist in the blues/funk/classic rock band Funky Bus & the U-Turns. He is currently part of the multi-instrumentalist free folk jam trio the Ghosts of Electricity. Mattingly recently completed his first year at Bard College, pursuing a double degree in music composition and classics.

Dylan Mattingly appears in the following:

Dylan Mattingly

Tuesday, June 15, 2010

Sometimes people write music because the world seems off-kilter, because the world seems to be missing something and there's only one way to fix it. And sometimes people write music because the world seems so overwhelmingly beautiful that you want to preserve it anyway you can.

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