David Remnick

Host, The New Yorker Radio Hour

David Remnick has been editor of The New Yorker since 1998 and a staff writer since 1992. He has written many pieces for the magazine, including reporting from Russia, the Middle East, and Europe, and Profiles of Barack Obama, Bill Clinton, Katharine Graham, Mike Tyson, Ralph Ellison, Philip Roth, and Benjamin Netanyahu.

Remnick began his reporting career as a staff writer at the Washington Post in 1982, where he covered stories for the Metro, Sports, and Style sections. In 1988, he started a four-year tenure as a Washington PostMoscow correspondent, an experience that formed the basis of his 1993 book on the former Soviet Union, “Lenin’s Tomb: The Last Days of the Soviet Empire.” In 1994, “Lenin’s Tomb” received both the Pulitzer Prize for nonfiction and a George Polk Award for excellence in journalism.

Since Remnick became editor, The New Yorker has garnered a hundred and forty-nine nominations for National Magazine Awards and has won thirty-seven. In 2001 and again in 2005, the magazine won an unprecedented five National Magazine Awards; in 2014, the magazine won four awards. In addition, in 2000 Remnick was namedAdvertising Age’s Editor of the Year.

Remnick has written six books: “Lenin’s Tomb,” “Resurrection: The Struggle for a New Russia,” “King of the World” (a biography of Muhammad Ali), “The Bridge” (a biography of Barack Obama), and “The Devil Problem” and “Reporting,” which are collections of some of his pieces from the magazine. Remnick has edited many anthologies of New Yorker pieces, including “Life Stories,” “Wonderful Town,” “The New Gilded Age,” “Fierce Pajamas,” “Secret Ingredients,” and “Disquiet, Please!”

Remnick has contributed to The New York Review of BooksVanity FairEsquire, andThe New Republic. He has been a Visiting Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and has taught at Princeton, where he received his B.A., in 1981, and at Columbia. He lives in New York with his wife, Esther Fein; they have three children, Alex, Noah, and Natasha.

David Remnick appears in the following:

At the Brink with North Korea

Friday, September 22, 2017

The growing tensions between the U.S. and North Korea make war sound inevitable, but Evan Osnos says that in spite of appearances, neither country has an appetite for war.

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At the Brink with North Korea

Friday, September 22, 2017

The growing tensions between the U.S. and North Korea make war sound inevitable; Evan Osnos investigates. Plus, Julia Louis-Dreyfus on President Selina Meyer.    

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For Teen Activists, What Good Is a Protest Song?

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Vinson Cunningham talks with teen-age activists about the value of an old-fashioned protest.

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David Remnick and Hillary Clinton discuss “What Happened”

Monday, September 18, 2017

Hillary Clinton has no doubt that allies of Donald Trump colluded with Russia and WikiLeaks to derail her election.

Hillary Clinton Explains What Happened

Friday, September 15, 2017

In a long interview with David Remnick, Hillary Clinton makes her case that a Trump ally or allies colluded with Russia and WikiLeaks to derail her election.

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Hillary Clinton on the “Clear and Present Danger” of Collusion with Russia

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Hillary Clinton harbors no doubts that allies of Donald Trump, as yet unknown, colluded with Russia and WikiLeaks to derail her election.    

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Hillary Clinton on the “Clear and Present Danger” of Collusion with Russia

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Hillary Clinton harbors no doubts that allies of Donald Trump, as yet unknown, colluded with Russia and WikiLeaks to derail her election.    

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What Was It Like Before the Internet?

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Jenny Slate reads a story about a magical time of unfettered creativity—and zero productivity. And Susan Orlean gets life lessons from an origami guru.    

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After Charlottesville, the Limits of Free Speech

Friday, September 08, 2017

When is speech no longer just speech? Bloody unrest in Charlottesville and protests at campuses like U.C. Berkeley are testing the limits of free expression.

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After Charlottesville, the Limits of Free Speech

Friday, September 08, 2017

When is speech no longer just speech? Bloody unrest in Charlottesville and protests at campuses like U.C. Berkeley are testing the liberal consensus on freedom of expression.

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Neil Gorsuch and the Uses of History

Tuesday, September 05, 2017

Conservative and liberal legal scholars make history their battleground. And a voice-recognition program calls to mind “2001: A Space Odyssey” and “The Golden Girls.”  

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A Visit with Harry Belafonte, and an Isolated Tribe Emerges

Friday, September 01, 2017

Harry Belafonte, now ninety, discusses his lifelong activism. And an isolated tribe emerges from a forest in the Amazon.

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A Visit with Harry Belafonte, and an Isolated Tribe Emerges

Friday, September 01, 2017

In this episode, Harry Belafonte discusses his lifelong activism; an isolated tribe emerges from a forest; and we try out a voice-recognition gadget that doesn’t know when to shut up.  

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Nick Lowe Gets Better with Age

Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Aging and mortality are on the singer-songwriter’s mind, and he wants to make great rock and roll out of them.    

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John Ridley on Charlottesville and the Legacy of Racism

Friday, August 25, 2017

The writer of “12 Years a Slave” says that, despite the spectacle of white supremacy on the rise, America can change for the better. And Mark Lilla on the cost of identity politics.

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John Ridley on Charlottesville, and Nick Lowe Gets Old

Friday, August 25, 2017

Writer and director John Ridley confronts the legacy of racism without giving up hope; singer-songwriter Nick Lowe confronts aging and mortality without giving up humor.  

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Why Men Should Read Romance Novels

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

The New Yorker’s Josh Rothman explains why men are missing out on romance novels, and Sherman Alexie reads a new story about a motel maid confronting the ugly sides of human nature.

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Russian Spies Never Go Out of Style

Friday, August 18, 2017

A former C.I.A. operative writes about the struggle between East and West, and Annie Dillard describes the awesome, frightening experience of a total eclipse.  

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Steamy Summer Reads: Spies, Sex, and a Total Eclipse

Friday, August 18, 2017

Russian spies in fiction and reality, why men should read romance novels, Annie Dillard describes a total eclipse, and a new story by Sherman Alexie.

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Foraging for a Salad in Central Park

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Patricia Marx goes foraging in Central Park, and Kathryn Schulz recommends a country music album, a poet, and a movie about magicians.  

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