Streams

Christopher Joyce

Christopher Joyce appears in the following:

Can A Big Earthquake Trigger Another One?

Friday, August 23, 2013

A new scientific report claims that a powerful quake can, in effect, be contagious. The finding could have important implications for hazard planning in earthquake zones.

Comment

Where The Whale Sharks Go

Thursday, August 22, 2013

A nine-year study tracked more than 800 of the massive and largely mysterious whale sharks. For the first time, researchers have tracked the sharks' far-flung migration and where they may go to give birth.

Comment

Old Hawaiian Menus Tell Story Of Local Fish And Their Demise

Friday, August 09, 2013

An ecologist wondered if Hawaiian menus might help explain what happened to Hawaii's sea turtle population. But the menus revealed another marine tragedy: that local fish numbers had dropped to about a tenth of what they once were.

Comment

Earth Scientists Pin Climate Change Squarely On 'Humanity'

Tuesday, August 06, 2013

The federal government's top climate scientists announced Tuesday that 2012 was really hot — among the top 10 hottest years on record and the hottest ever in the U.S., with rising sea levels, less Arctic sea ice and warmer oceans. And the American Geophysical Union called humanity "the major influence" on global climate change.

Comment

Jack Longino, 'The Astonishing Ant Man,' Finds 33 New Species

Thursday, August 01, 2013

All told, the scientist has discovered 131 new species of animals in his career, and some are so scary-looking, he's named them after demons. It's a task that's taken more than 30 years of crawling through rain forests to accomplish, and Longino says he's still only scratched the surface.

Comment

Once Resilient, Trees In The West Now More Vulnerable To Fires

Monday, July 29, 2013

Many forests in the American West have evolved with fire, and actually benefit from the occasional wildfire. But researchers are finding that trees that once would survive and thrive with small fires are now losing their ability to do so.

Comment

Why The Latest Gulf Leak Is No BP Disaster

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

Deep-sea natural gas reservoirs sometimes contain oil, but experts say it's highly unlikely Tuesday's accident in the Gulf of Mexico would leak anything like the BP spill. And there are signs suggesting the only thing crews have to deal with is leaking gas.

Comment

Fighting Fire With Fire: Why Some Burns Are Good For Nature

Sunday, July 21, 2013

Fire is a natural part of the western landscape, and a push over the last century to eliminate fires has threatened the habitats that some plants and animals need. In a Montana valley, fire scientists are trying to show that they can actually save wilderness by burning it.

Comment

Wildfires Will Worsen, And Further Strain The Forest Service

Thursday, July 18, 2013

Over the past decade, fires in the American West have grown in intensity and size. "We're on a growth trajectory that is very scary," says one fire tracker. "And if we think it's expensive and dangerous now, we're just now seeing the very beginnings of how big this problem is going to be very soon."

Comment

Om Nom Nom: T. Rex Was, Indeed, A Voracious Hunter

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

A fossilized tyrannosaur tooth found lodged between bones in a hadrosaur's tail is giving paleobiologists pretty firm clues about the tyrant king's meal plan. And Hollywood may have been right all along — T. Rex definitely knew how to kill.

Comment

Wastewater Wells, Geothermal Power Triggering Earthquakes

Thursday, July 11, 2013

Pumping industrial wastewater into storage wells deep underground can prime nearby faults for an earthquake. And studies show that a large quake — even one on the other side of the planet — can also push faults over the edge and set off a swarm of mini-earthquakes.

Comment

Saving One Species At The Expense Of Another

Thursday, July 11, 2013

In Montana's Centennial Valley, conservationists made a grievous mistake while trying to save the trumpeter swan — they nearly wiped out Arctic grayling. Now they're looking for ways to make sure both species get a place on the ark.

Comment

In Montana Wilds, An Unlikely Alliance To Save The Sage Grouse

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

The chicken-size sage grouse is as much a part of America's Western range as antelopes and cowboys. The birds nest beneath sagebrush, and as it disappears, so do the grouse. Biologists hope to protect the bird without starting a 21st century range war.

Comment

Radiocarbon Clues Help Track Down Poached Elephant Ivory

Tuesday, July 02, 2013

Nuclear bomb tests in the 1950s and '60s pumped a lot of radiocarbon into the atmosphere. It went everywhere, including into plants that elephants eat. By measuring the levels of this carbon in elephant tusks, scientists can tell when an elephant died — and whether the ivory is being traded illegally.

Comment

Tiny, Ancient Tree-Dweller Was One Of Earth's Earliest Primates

Wednesday, June 05, 2013

About 55 million years ago, a teacup-sized critter in China was helping to pave the way for apes and humans. This insect eater had fingernails and stereo vision, a newly published analysis of a fossil suggests. And it weighed just 1 ounce.

Comment

Big-Mouthed Toucans Key To Forest Evolution

Friday, May 31, 2013

As humans have cut into Brazil's forests, the toucan population has taken a dive. The trees, in turn, have changed, too: Without large-billed birds to eat fruit with big seeds, only trees with small seeds thrive. Eventually, one scientist says, "the impacts on the forest could be quite dramatic."

Comment

With Rising Seas, America's Birthplace Could Disappear

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

By the end of the century, ocean levels could rise by 2 or 3 feet. That's enough to flood the colonists' first settlement at Jamestown, Va. And it's putting pressure on archaeologists to get as many artifacts out of the ground as quickly as possible — before it's too late.

Comment

Bones Tell Tale Of Desperation Among The Starving At Jamestown

Wednesday, May 01, 2013

The winter of 1609-1610 has been called the "starving time" for the hundreds of men and women who settled the English colony of Jamestown, Va. They ate their horses, their pets — and, apparently, at least one person. Scientists say human bones recovered from the site provide the first hard evidence that the colonists may have resorted to cannibalism.

Comment

How Doctors Would Know If Syrians Were Hit With Nerve Gas

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

An international team of doctors is helping Syrian health workers recognize the signs of a chemical attack. They're also teaching them how to collect and preserve tissues as potential evidence if war crimes charges are brought.

Comment

What's Behind The 'Fairy Circles' That Dot West Africa?

Thursday, March 28, 2013

Fly from Angola down to South Africa and you'll see thousands of circles of bare dirt covering the land. They're up to 30 feet across and ringed by tufts of grass. The origin of the shapes has long been a mystery, but researchers now say hordes of termites may be acting as engineers.

Comment