Streams

Brooke Gladstone

Host, On The Media

Brooke Gladstone appears in the following:

So Many Keys

Friday, March 21, 2014

Four times a year, members of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICAAN, take part in an elaborate ceremony (iris scanners!) designed to assure the world that the organization is doing its best to keep the web connected and safe. Brooke explains the meeting of the keyholders, with insight from Guardian reporter James Ball, who attended one of the ceremonies last month.

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The Re-Birth of the First Amendment

Friday, March 14, 2014

Fifty years ago, the Supreme Court made a decision in the case New York Times v Sullivan that would forever alter the way journalists practiced journalism. Brooke speaks with Andrew Cohen, contributing editor at The Atlantic and fellow at the Brennan Center for Justice, about the decision's impact on the First Amendment.

Supreme Court audio courtesy of Oyez®, a multimedia judicial archive at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law

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Stepping into the Light

Friday, March 14, 2014

As we’ve previously reported, US Customs and Border Protection, under the aegis of the Department of Homeland Security, is one of the least transparent agencies in the country. But late last week, sparked by a leak of a review done by the Police Executive Research Forum, CBP shone a little light on its processes. Brooke speaks to Brian Bennett, National Security Correspondent for the Los Angeles Times and the Chicago Tribune, who was the recipient of that initial leaked report. 

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FOIA's Report Card

Friday, March 14, 2014

The Freedom of Information Act has been around since 1966, but according to a new report card, federal agencies haven’t yet mastered the art of disclosing. Brooke speaks with Sean Moulton of the Center for Effective government, which just released The Access to Information Scorecard 2014, a sobering look at government transparency.

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Device Searches at the Border

Friday, February 28, 2014

The border is a legal gray area where the same constitutional protections one expects inside the country don't necessarily apply. When graduate student Pascal Abidor had his electronic devices searched and seized at the border back in 2010, he filed lawsuit against the federal government. But in December, a federal judge upheld the government's right to search travelers' devices at the border without a warrant. Brooke speaks with Pascal about his experience at the border and the lawsuit.

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My Detainment Story or: How I Learned To Stop Feeling Safe In My Own Country and Hate Border Agents

Friday, February 28, 2014

Back in September, OTM producer Sarah Abdurrahman, her family, and her friends were detained for hours by US Customs and Border Protection on their way home from Canada. Everyone being held was a US citizen, and no one received an explanation. Sarah tells the story of their detainment, and her difficulty getting any answers from one of the least transparent agencies in the country.

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Shedding Light on DHS

Friday, February 28, 2014

Getting information from Customs and Border Protection and the Department of Homeland Security is not just difficult for journalists and private citizens—even members of Congress have a hard time getting answers. Brooke speaks with Representative Beto O'Rourke of Texas' 16th District about the oversight needed to ensure more transparency from DHS.

And a crowdsourcing project to Shed Light on DHS!

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Capturing Egypt’s Neverending Story

Friday, February 21, 2014

The Oscar-nominated documentary “The Square” turns a lens on the Egyptian revolution and its aftermath through the eyes of three very different men whose lives intersected in Tahrir Square in 2011. Brooke talks with director Jehane Noujaim and producer Karim Amer about capturing Egypt’s unfolding narrative on camera. Audio courtesy of the Paley Center for Media.

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Cable Barons

Friday, February 21, 2014

The proposed merger of Comcast and Time Warner Cable could do more than mess with our TV and Internet bills. It could shape how many of us experience the flow of ideas. Brooke talks with communications law scholar Susan P. Crawford about the potential impact of this mega-merger on the information we access through Comcast's digital pipe. 

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A Rabble-Rouser On Jeopardy

Friday, February 07, 2014

The latest Jeopardy sensation has thus far amassed $102,800 dollars on a four-game winning streak -- but his playing style is making traditionalists shudder. Arthur Chu has rejected the unwritten rule that the guy (or gal) with the most facts wins, and replaced it with the idea that you can outwit your opponent with the wily application of game theory.

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"Winter Chill" for Russian Media

Friday, February 07, 2014

As the global spotlight fixes on Sochi this weekend, the Russian government is crushing dissent...and there’s a lot of it. As the Committee to Protect Journalists notes in a new report, people there have suffered long-lasting power outages, environmental damage, evictions, corruption, and widespread violation of labor laws. But local news organizations are silent on these issues, instead functioning as public relations agencies for the government. Brooke talks with Nina Ognianova about the stories that aren't being told in the Russian media. 

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Knox Found Guilty...Again

Friday, February 07, 2014

Last week an Italian court found Amanda Knox guilty of the murder of British student Meredith Kercher. Again. Knox was first found guilty in 2009. In the almost seven years since this story broke, an industry of books, websites and made-for-tv movies has emerge to exploit  - or investigate - the case of Amanda Knox. Brooke speaks to author Nina Burleigh, who wrote one of the best accounts of the Knox case, “The Fatal Gift of Beauty, The Trials of Amanda Knox."

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The Inventor of Instant Replay

Friday, January 31, 2014

This weekend’s superbowl comes just over 50 years after the Army-Navy football game of December 1963, when we saw the very first use of instant replay. As Anna Clark wrote in Pacific Standard, the television trick that transformed the way we watch and officiate sports is thanks to an intrepid producer named Tony Verna, who would go on to achieve acclaim overseeing myriad live TV events like the bi-continental charity concert “Live Aid” and specials with Pope John Paul II. Brooke talks with Tony Verna about why it was so hard to replay live television back then, and how he found a way to outsmart his equipment. 

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The 10th Anniversary of the "Wardrobe Malfunction"

Friday, January 31, 2014

10 years ago, the 90 million people who were watching the 38th Super Bowl's half time show bore witness to the first so-called "wardrobe malfunction" when Justin Timberlake accidentally exposed Janet Jackson's breast. That nine-sixteenths of a second had profound and far reaching effects on our culture, writes Marin Cogan for ESPN Magazine. Brooke talks with Cogan about her article, "In the Beginning, There Was a Nipple," that explores how history changed in the wake of "Nipplegate."

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The Belfast Project

Friday, January 31, 2014

Begun in 2000, the Belfast Project was an oral history project that aimed to document combatants’ stories in the clashes between the Irish Republican Army and the Irish Loyalist Army in the 1970s through the 1990s. But the charged nature of what interviewees told the project has brought immense pressure on the project's organizers to release records of the interviews, which they'd promised to keep secret. Brooke talks with Anthony McIntyre who recorded many of the interviews for the project.

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The Future of Oral History Projects

Friday, January 31, 2014

Brooke speaks with Jack Dunn, the Director of the Boston College News and Public Affairs office about what Boston College has done to protect the tapes from the Belfast Project and the future of academic oral history projects.  

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Do the Motivations of Leakers Matter?

Friday, January 24, 2014

A recent Pew poll found that although 45% of Americans believe Snowden's leak helped the public, 56% wanted criminal charges brought against him. Did he act to protect the rights of Americans, or dismantle what he considers a surveillance state? Does it matter why he acted? Brooke talks to New Republic contributing editor Sean Wilentz about his cover story that asks that very question.

Beacon - Late November

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Banning The Other N-Word?

Friday, January 24, 2014

The Israeli Knesset has given preliminary approval to a bill that would criminalize use of the word Nazi, and Nazi symbols, except in certain educational or artistic contexts. Violators could face fines as high as twenty-nine thousand dollars, and up to six months in jail. Backers of the bill seek to prevent disrespect of the Holocaust that results when Nazis are invoked casually, whether in political invective or adolescent insults. Brooke talks with linguistic anthropologist Paja Faudree about this legislative attempt to control the use of language.

The Bees - Winter Rose

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Obama Threads the NSA Needle

Friday, January 17, 2014

Today President Obama announced changes to the United States’ surveillance policies. While Obama addressed greater security measures for telephone data, much of the NSA’s surveillance practices remain intact. Listen to a sneak preview of this week’s On the Media, where Brooke Gladstone examines the President’s proposal for the future of the NSA surveillance program.

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Policing Gangs Through Rap Videos

Friday, January 17, 2014

In New York City, 30 percent of all shootings are tied to youth gang rivalries. There are over 300 street crews in the city, loosely affiliated gangs that battle mainly over turf. The rivalries often play out in rap videos made by the gangs and posted on YouTube. Those videos - and threats of violence in their lyrics - are being used as evidence by New York City police to make arrests. Brooke talks with WNYC reporter Kathleen Horan about this policing technique. 

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