Brooke Gladstone

Host, On The Media

Brooke Gladstone is best known for the …pause…that Bob Garfield inserts before mentioning her name in the credits for On the Media. Among her other accomplishments, she was an NPR Moscow-based reporter, its first media reporter, senior editor of NPR’s All Things Considered, and the senior editor of Weekend Edition with Scott Simon. As the years progress, she grows ever more senior.

She’s the recipient of two Peabody Awards, a National Press Club Award, an Overseas Press Club Award and many others you tend to collect if you hang out in public radio long enough.

Just before coming to On the Media, she did some pilots for WNYC of a call-in show about human relationships with Dan Savage called A More Perfect Union. That was pretty cool.

She also is the author of The Influencing Machine (W.W. Norton), a media manifesto in graphic form, listed among the top books of 2011 by The New Yorker, Publisher’s Weekly, Kirkus Reviews and Library Journal, and among the “10 Masterpieces of Graphic Nonfiction” by The Atlantic.

Gladstone always wanted to be a comic hero and she finally did it. Here she is animated.

At WNYC’s 2012 Christmas party, backed by the fabulous Radio Flyers band, she sang “Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen,” with her sisters Lisa and Stacey, thus fulfilling all her dreams.

Shows and Blogs:

Brooke Gladstone appears in the following:

John Hodgman v. Dan Pashman: Are Hot Dogs Sandwiches?

Monday, November 30, 2015

This long-running feud comes to a head live on stage, with WNYC's Brooke Gladstone moderating. It's like a presidential debate, but with more dignity.

Surveillance Beyond the Patriot Act

Friday, November 27, 2015

We all know the Patriot Act, but lesser-known programs like Executive Order 12333 account for the bulk of government surveillance--and receive even less oversight. 

Present At The Creation

Friday, November 27, 2015

A mere six weeks after 9/11, the USA PATRIOT Act was passed. Brooke and Bob relive the act's conception amid a climate of fear, confusion, and deceit.

The Patriot Act's Unintended Consequences

Friday, November 27, 2015

Ultimately, our assumption that the Patriot Act is at the center of our nation's struggle between privacy and security...may not be true. 

What's in the Bill?

Friday, November 27, 2015

For almost fourteen years we've been hearing about the Patriot Act. What's in it, again?

"Collect It All" Doesn't work

Friday, November 27, 2015

Debate about mass surveillance for counter-terrorism purposes has resurged post-Paris attacks. But evidence shows that bulk data collection isn't the solution to fighting terrorism. 

Lessons Unlearned

Friday, November 20, 2015

The Paris attacks have been deemed "France's 9/11." But do the politics and rhetoric of this week reflect what we've learned in the 14 years since 9/11? 

Why Paris, And Not Beirut?

Friday, November 20, 2015

More than 40 people died in two ISIS bombings in Beirut just a day before the Paris attacks. A Lebanese journalist describes the different language used to describe the Beirut victims.

Breaking News Consumer's Handbook: Terrorism Edition

Friday, November 20, 2015

Drawing on reporters, terrorism experts, and the media's best and worst impulses, a Breaking News Consumer's Handbook for the coverage after an act of terror.

The Turkey Who Loved My Wife (Repeat)

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Radiolab's Robert Krulwich tells the story of a turkey that put the moves on his wife, and On The Media's Brooke Gladstone shows us how NOT to make dessert.

This guy reads the New York Times over brunch. But probably not the way you do.

Friday, November 13, 2015

Many seek out articles not because they inspire them but because they infuriate. Hence the venerable tradition of "hate-reading" the New York Times' Style and Real Estate sections.

He doesn't just want you to click; he wants you to care. Meet the 'Carebot.'

Friday, November 13, 2015

The current metric for online articles shows how much we click. NPR is creating a metric that shows how much we care.

We all cried when we saw this photo. Then we forgot.

Friday, November 13, 2015

A close study of European newspapers found that the moving image of a dead Syrian boy, Aylan Kurdi, only made a small impact on the overall coverage of the migrant crisis in Europe. 

Is the Internet broken? Can we fix it?

Friday, November 13, 2015

In the desperate pursuit of clicks - and the advertising dollars that come with clicks - online publishers have realized the best way to grab our attention is to make us furious.

Want to know how Upworthy makes you feel things? Here's how.

Friday, November 13, 2015

Upworthy is built on curating and creating content that moves its audiences enough to share it on social media. But its also reviled for its sensationalist brand of headline.

The Media Skirmish in Missouri Isn’t About the Media. It’s About Race.

Friday, November 13, 2015

Student protesters at the University of Missouri blocked media access in a confrontation caught on video. A reporter reflects on why the movement is keeping the press at arm's length.

Virtual reality might change the way you see the world

Friday, November 13, 2015

Last week, the New York Times sent 1.2 million subscribers a set of virtual reality cardboard headsets. How much does the technology really move the needle on empathy?

Twitter Turned Its Star Into a Heart. :’-(

Friday, November 13, 2015

Twitter replaced its icon for favorites, the star, with a heart. Emily Bell, director of the Tow Centre for Digital Journalism, explains why she really doesn’t heart... the heart.  

Marco Rubio: The Frontrunner in Third

Friday, October 30, 2015

Marco Rubio has been polling at a steady third - or lower - for months, so why have so many in the media tapped him as the favorite to win the Republican nomination?

"Ferguson Effect" Theory Falls Apart

Friday, October 30, 2015

Law Professor Jeffrey Fagan debunks the "Ferguson effect" theory - the idea that increased visibility and public scrutiny of police action impedes policing and encourages crime.