Streams

Brooke Gladstone

Host, On The Media

Brooke Gladstone appears in the following:

Reporting on Foot From Around the World

Friday, August 16, 2013

Reporter Paul Salopek has filed stories from all over the world, but never like he is right now. Since January, Salopek has been on what he calls the “Out of Eden Walk,” a 21,000 mile trek, on foot, which began in East Africa’s Great Rift Valley, will end seven years from now in Tierra del Fuego, the southernmost tip of South America. Brooke talks to Salopek about why he's chosen to report this way, and his milestones so far.

Jenny Scheinman - A Ride With Polly Jean

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A Role Model for Security Savvy Journos

Friday, August 16, 2013

The first time Edward Snowden wanted to leak information to Glenn Greenwald it didn't go so well -- Greenwald was stymied by the security requirements Snowden demanded before communicating sensitive information online. Brooke talks with journalist Peter Maass about the documentary filmmaker Laura Poitras and how Snowden ended up securely communicating with her.

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Patchy

Friday, August 16, 2013

Patch, AOL's hyper-local reporting site, has announced it is cutting its staff of 1,100 nearly in half. Brooke talks with the Wall Street Journal's Keach Hagey about what this means for local reporting and about AOL CEO Tim Armstrong's snap firing of an employee during a Patch-wide conference call.

 

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Difficult Men

Friday, August 09, 2013

Breaking Bad returns this weekend for its final 8-episode run this weekend. You can find an answer to why the show has joined the pantheon of greats including The Sopranos, The Wire, Mad Men and more in TV’s current Golden Age, in Brett Martin’ s new book, Difficult Men: Behind the Scenes of a Creative Revolution. Brooke talks to Martin about how we ended up in this TV renaissance. 

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Creation of the Media

Friday, August 09, 2013

It's often been observed that technological innovations are the primary force driving the evolution of the mass media. But make your way through the 402 pages Paul Starr's book The Creation of the Media, and that notion will be left in dust - along with many other common assumptions. In the book, Starr argues that the government has played a much more fundamental role in the growth of the American media than is commonly thought. He discusses his research with Brooke.

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From Russia with Love (And Heroin)

Friday, August 02, 2013

Journalist Brian Krebs has been writing about computer security for years, much to the chagrin of the online fraudsters and identity thieves he reports upon. He often finds himself on the receiving end of online attacks from these criminals, but last month, they hatched a much more elaborate plan. Brooke speaks to Krebs about being harassed by Russian cyber criminals.

Shigeto - Ringleader

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On the Media's Unpaid Interns

Friday, August 02, 2013

Brooke talks to former On the Media intern (and current producer) Alex Goldman, and current On the Media intern Molly Buckley about their experiences as interns for the show.

Zissou Society Blue Star Cadets - Ned's Theme

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The World of Unpaid Internships

Friday, August 02, 2013

For years, unpaid internships have been a media industry standard. But over the past couple of months, there have been a rash of lawsuits against media companies for not paying interns. Brooke investigates the state of the unpaid internship.

Mark Mothersbaugh - Let me tell you about my boat

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Telegram Surveillance

Friday, August 02, 2013

Back in the pre-digital 1940's, telegrams were the basis of the first large scale domestice surveillance program, launched by an agency that would become the NSA. Brooke speaks to "Daily Dot" writer Joe Kloc about the history of US surveillance, from the telegram to email.

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Dirty Laundering

Friday, July 26, 2013

This week, the gossip website The Dirty posted screenshots of explicit chats between an anonymous woman and New York City mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner. Even though the legitimacy of the screenshots could not be confirmed, other news outlets ran the information, and within hours Buzzfeed had identified and named the woman in the chats. Brooke talks to McKay Coppins, Buzzfeed's political editor, about reporting, transparency, and veracity.

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France Strikes "Three Strikes"

Friday, July 26, 2013

France's infamous anti-piracy law, known as Hadopi, was supposed to kick copyright infringers off the internet after giving them three warnings, or "strikes." But this month, after spending almost four years and millions of Euros to disconnect just one lowly pirate, France finally dropped the Hadopi law. Brooke asks Techdirt writer Glyn Moody what went wrong with Hadopi and what's next in the war against piracy.

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The FBI's Anti-Piracy Warning

Friday, July 26, 2013

For years, Brooke's husband Fred has been pestering her to find out if anyone has received the "5 years in prison and or a $250,000 fine" for violating the FBI's anti-piracy warning you see at the start of DVDs. Brooke talks to the FBI's Financial Crimes Section Chief Angela Byers to see if she can get Fred his answer.

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The Dirty, Buzzfeed, and the Changing Media Landscape

Thursday, July 25, 2013

Two days ago, chances are nobody had ever heard of The Dirty. But now the website is in all major headlines as the place where the latest X-rated pictures involving Anthony Weiner surfaced. Another website, Buzzfeed, also published a piece on the woman who allegedly received the pictures from Weiner. The fact that two online publications are at the center of this story is raising questions about credibility and the evolution of media.

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Voice of America

Friday, July 19, 2013

We are often reminded of the privileges we enjoy as Americans, but here's one thing we can't do on native soil - tune in to Voice of America. The U.S. government radio station that was created as a propaganda tool during World War II was prohibited from broadcasting at home. In an interview that originally aired in 2003, Brooke talks to lifetime VOA staffer Alan Heil about his book Voice of America: A History.

Matmos - Y.T.T.E.

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After the Verdict

Friday, July 19, 2013

Last Saturday, George Zimmerman was found not guilty in the shooting of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. Since then, everyone from protesters to politicians to pundits have weighed in. Brooke talks to Tampa Bay Times media critic Eric Deggans about the reaction and how the verdict has reignited discussions of race in the U.S.

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Axis Sally

Friday, July 19, 2013

More than fifty years ago, Mildred Gillars was released from prison.  Known more widely as Axis Sally, Gillars broadcasted pro-Nazi propaganda during World War II on German state radio.  After the war, she became one of the only women ever convicted of treason in the United States. In an interview from 2011 Brooke talks to historian Richard Lucas, who wrote Gillars’ biography, about her broadcasts, her trial, and her quiet life in Ohio after her imprisonment.

Toots Thielemans - La Vie En Rose

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Trayvon Martin and the National Conversation on Race

Monday, July 15, 2013

George Zimmerman's acquittal in the death of Trayvon Martin is re-igniting calls for a national conversation about race. CNN news analysts and other on-air personalities repeated the phrase several times over the weekend as emotions ran high. But is it the media's job after racially charged events like this to facilitate the conversation?

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I want my slow TV!

Friday, July 12, 2013

The Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation has been creating some of the world's slowest TV - shows like a 7 hour train ride or 18 hours of salmon fishing. Norwegian audiences are loving it. Brooke speaks with Rune Moklebust of the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation about why he thinks so-called "boring TV" is actually quite exciting.

Nina Rota - Il Casanova di Federico Fellini 

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The Tech Lobby Comes of Age

Friday, July 12, 2013

Last year the single largest corporate lobbyist was General Electric.  The second biggest? A new arrival, called...Google. Time Magazine White House correspondent Michael Scherer tells Brooke what took the tech industry so long to get lobbying and what they're doing to influence politics.   

Andrew Bird - Orpheo Looks Back

 

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A Dark, Complex Story

Friday, July 12, 2013

Unlike the Egyptian revolution of 2011, the ouster of President Mohamed Morsi is a story without a clear protagonist or an easy, happy summary. Brooke talks with NPR's Deb Amos about the way the media both here and in the region has been handling that complexity. Amos covers the Middle East for NPR News.

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