Bob Garfield

Host, On The Media

Bob Garfield appears in the following:

Will the Phone Hacking Scandal Bring Down The British Government?

Friday, April 27, 2012

In Britain’s inquiry into the Murdochs this week the big revelation was a trove of 163 emails highlighting a cozy relationship between the office of the UK culture minister and one of James Murdoch’s closest aides. Daily Beast reporter Peter Jukes talks to Bob about the latest travails of the ...

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Dear Government: Make Yourself Plain

Friday, April 27, 2012

Bob speaks with former government employee Dr. Annetta Cheek who began advocating for clearer government writing after seeing a single, beautifully clear regulation.

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Do Book Copyrights Hide Them From View?

Friday, April 20, 2012

Copyright protections for books have had the effect of driving the vast majority of them from public view.  Meanwhile books in the public domain are surprisingly visible in places like Amazon.com.  So says law professor Paul Heald, who’s been testing this idea. He explains to Bob the negative effects of copyright extension and the not-so-threatening reality of the public domain.

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The Problem of Knock-Off Books

Friday, April 20, 2012

Buying a cheap knock-off is not just a problem with watches and hand bags—if you go onto Amazon's website to buy the latest bestseller, you might accidentally end up with an imitation book. Bob speaks to Fortune senior editor Stephen Gandel, who looked into the knock offs on Amazon, and found a number of books that he says were clearly meant to confuse people by trading off of more popular titles.

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Taking On Amazon

Friday, April 20, 2012

Most big publishers fear running afoul of Amazon, but one very small publisher has proven to be fearless. Bob talks to Randall White, who recently pulled all of his company's books from Amazon's web site.

 

Quartetto d’Archi Dell’Orchestra Sinfonica di Milano Giuseppe Verdi - Paperback Writer

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No Pulitzer Prize for Fiction

Friday, April 20, 2012

This year, for the first time in 35 years, there was no Pulitzer Prize awarded for fiction.  Was it a bad year for novels, is the Pulitzer selection process broken or is it a dire sign of things to come for the fiction industry?  Author, Salon senior writer and past Pulitzer fiction judge Laura Miller explains to Bob which way to read the Pulitzer’s non-award.

 

Papa Razzi and the Photogs - I Like the Books of Jane Austen

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Forecasting Political Scandals

Friday, April 13, 2012

Brendan Nyhan is a Dartmouth political scientist who studies why scandals break when they do. According to Nyhan, before this month's GSA fiasco, President Obama had the longest streak of scandal-free coverage of any President in recent history. Nyhan tells Bob that according to his theory, we can expect the coming months to be full of scandal coverage.

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The Failure of 'Failing Schools'

Friday, April 13, 2012

Schools are failing.  At least that’s the consensus if you’ve read any school reporting or heard any politicians promising much needed school reform since, well, approximately the beginning of American public education. But … is it true?  Washington Post reporter and columnist for the American Journalism Review Paul Farhi explains to Bob why the story doesn’t add up.   

 

The Spinanes - Kid in Candy

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Media Access Project Shutting Down

Friday, April 13, 2012

The non-profit Media Access Project has advocated on behalf of consumers in the areas of media diversity, freedom of expression and universal communication access for almost 40 years. But now the funding well has run dry and the organization is closing its doors. Bob speaks to Andrew Schwartzman who has been MAP's policy director for more than 30 years.

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The Perils of Reporting in North Korea

Friday, April 13, 2012

This week, news organizations selected by the North Korean government were permitted to report inside the country on the launch of a supposed weather satellite by the autocratic regime. The launch, which was more about military power than meteorology, was a spectacular failure. Bob speaks with B.R. Myers, who says that despite that failure, the mere presence of international media is useful to North Korean domestic propaganda.

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Making Laws More Public

Friday, April 13, 2012

Carl Malamud, government transparency advocate and president of public.resource.org believes safety standards should be easily accessible to all citizens for free. Yet many of these standards  --  from the design of bicycle helmets to water treatment components to hazmat suits – are the copyrighted creation of the industry organizations that have promulgated them. So Malamud has ponied up the dough to purchase exactly 73 of these standards, which he will publish online, copyright or no copyright.

 

The Spinanes - Lure and Cast

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The Associated Press in North Korea

Friday, April 13, 2012

The world’s media may have been invited for a rare peek into North Korea this week but one news organization was already there - the Associated Press.  After a year of negotiations the AP opened the first all format, full-time bureau in Pyongyang in January, the first western journalism outfit to ever do so.  Executive Editor and Senior Vice President of the Associated Press Kathleen Carroll talks to Bob about what it means to bring the AP’s journalistic standards to reporting in North Korea.

 

Smog - I'm New Here

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The Upside of Legal Advertising

Friday, April 06, 2012

Late night ads for lawyers on TV seem like the lowest form of advertising - they prey on the weak and sleep deprived, encouraging them to monetize their misery by starting frivolous lawsuits. But might they actually serve a purpose? In a piece that originally aired in 2011, Bob talks to legal experts as well as the grandfather of legal advertising, and finds that even the sleaziest ad does something for the common good.

 

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Misconceptions about Gas Prices and the Presidency

Friday, April 06, 2012

With gas prices on the rise, the cost of fuel is set to become a defining issue of the presidential race. Bob speaks to NPR's Planet Money reporter Adam Davidson about how the media haven't done a good job correcting misconceptions about the president's role in rising fuel costs and how the staggering price of gas doesn't really change consumer behavior.

 

Errors - Tusk

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YouTube's Reply to the "Reply Girls" and Other Irrelevant Videos

Friday, April 06, 2012

OTM recently looked at the phenomenon of "Reply Girls," the cleavage baring women crowding YouTube with nonsensical videos. YouTube says it is trying to fix the problem of irrelevant videos on its site. Bob speaks to YouTube engineering director Cristos Goodrow about how the site is changing its algorithm to show users more of what they want to see.

 

Smog - Held

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President Obama, Press Critic

Friday, April 06, 2012

President Obama addressed journalists at an Associated Press luncheon and warned them against practicing “false equivalency” – pretending that both sides in a disagreement are equally at fault, even when they’re not. The Atlantic’s James Fallows talks to Bob about the President’s attempt at media criticism.

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A Problematic Test Case for Bloggers As Journalists

Friday, April 06, 2012

In November, an Oregon Federal court awarded a $2.5 million judgment against a blogger named Crystal Cox for defamation. In his opinion, the judge took controversial positions about whether bloggers deserved the protections granted to traditional journalists. The Electronic Frontier Foundation's Trevor Timm tells Bob that even though the judgment against Cox may be warranted, that opinion could set dangerous precedents for all online journalists.

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The First Cell Phone Call

Friday, April 06, 2012

Last week marked the anniversary of the first public cell phone call. It was 1973, ten years before cell phones would become commercially available and many more years before they would become wildly popular. Bob speaks with Martin Cooper, the former Motorola-man who made the first call about his company's rivalry with AT&T and the future of cell phones.

 

The Durutti Column - Sketch for Summer

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Combating "Bad" Speech with More Speech

Friday, April 06, 2012

First Amendment lawyer Marc Randazza disagrees with the Electronic Frontier Foundation's position on the Crystal Cox case despite being the target of one of her attacks. Randazza talks to Bob about that experience and whether it has tested his faith in the First Amendment.

 

Tanlines - Rain Delay

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Letters

Friday, April 06, 2012

Bob reads from a few of your letters and comments.

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