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°F We should be hitting 90 degrees today. Hear what this means for Maeve, a curator at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden.

Bill McQuay

Bill McQuay appears in the following:

Good Vibrations Key To Insect Communication

Thursday, August 27, 2015

For some insects, sound waves or vibrations are the real social media — high-speed rumbles sent through the air and along leaf stems to help the bugs claim territory, send warnings and find mates.

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To Decode Elephant Conversation, You Must Feel The Jungle Rumble

Thursday, August 20, 2015

The trumpeting roar of an elephant is loud. But scientists living with herds in the forests of central Africa say the deep rumbles that humans can't hear, but can feel, carry crucial messages, too.

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Listening To Whale Migration Reveals A Sea Of Noise Pollution, Too

Thursday, August 13, 2015

Christopher Clark, an engineer turned whale biologist, wired the world's oceans with hydrophones. Whales sing as they migrate, he learned. And the ship sounds clouding the ocean can deeply interfere.

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It Took A Musician's Ear To Decode The Complex Song In Whale Calls

Thursday, August 06, 2015

Male humpback whales create "songs" together, scientists say. Katy Payne was the first to hear the shifts in pitch and pattern in the collective calls as complex music — haunting, evolving tunes.

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Close Listening: How Sound Reveals The Invisible

Thursday, July 30, 2015

The stethoscope seems so simple — a 19th century tool for listening more closely to the human heart or lungs. It also sparked a culture of listening that is transforming the way scientists learn.

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Former Commando Turns Conservationist To Save Elephants Of Dzanga Bai

Friday, May 09, 2014

Nir Kalron was once an Israeli commando, then private security consultant to African leaders, and a dealer of legal arms. Today he's working with African locals to hunt ivory poachers via satellite.

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Civil War Invades An Elephant Sanctuary: One Researcher's Escape

Thursday, May 08, 2014

Andrea Turkalo spent 22 years in central Africa, studying rare forest elephants. Then civil war forced her to flee — and poachers killed many of the elephants she'd shared a life with.

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