Streams

Recent Episodes and Articles

Latest Episode / Wednesday, April 16, 2014 Edit This

Sarah Jessica Parker Guest Hosts

Sarah Jessica Parker fills in again for Leonard Lopate. World-famous ballet dancer Gelsey Kirkland and her husband, Michael Chernov, talk about the history of classical ballet and about launching the Gelsey Kirkland Conservatory of Classical Ballet. Ashley Bouder and Sara Mearns tell us what it’s like to be principal dancers with the New York City Ballet. Anthony Marra discusses his debut novel, A Constellation of Vital Phenomena. And Glenn Lowry, director of the Museum of Modern Art, describes what goes into MoMA’s major shows and talks about the future of museums.

Segments and Articles

Dancers Gelsey Kirkland and Michael Chernov on Creating an Academy of Classical Ballet

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Legendary ballet dancer Gelsey Kirkland and her husband, Michael Chernov, talk about creating The Gelsey Kirkland Academy of Classical Ballet. They discuss ballet’s role in the city’s culture, the history of classical ballet, how they came together, and their own individual paths in dance. Their new production of “Sleeping Beauty” will be presented in mid-May at the Schimmel Center at Pace University and their new summer camp begins at the end of June.

Read More

Comment

Ashley Bouder and Sara Mearns on Dancing in the New York City Ballet

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Ashley Bouder and Sara Mearns, principal dancers with the New York City Ballet, talk about their careers as dancers, and the demands and rewards  of dancing in the NYCB.

Read More

Comment

MoMA Director Glenn Lowry

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Glenn D. Lowry, director of The Museum of Modern Art, explains what goes on behind-the-scenes to organize major exhibitions, such as the current “Gauguin Metamorphoses” show, the museum’s transformation over the past two decades, and MoMA’s place in the cultural landscape in New York and around the world.


Read More

Comment

A Constellation of Vital Phenomena, a Novel by Anthony Marra

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Anthony Marra discusses his debut novel, A Constellation of Vital Phenomena. It’s set in Chechnya and explores the transcendent power of love in wartime.

Read More

Comment

Dexter Filkins: Covering War Distorts Everything

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Guest host Sarah Jessica Parker talked to journalist Dexter Filkins about covering war and his experiences covering war in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Iraq. He joined The New Yorker in January of 2011; before that he was with the New York Times since 2000.

Read More

Comments [10]

Artist Alex Katz

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Alex Katz discusses his long career as a painter, printmaker, and sculptor. He's best known for his large-scale portraits and landscapes.

Read More

Comments [4]

"Mothers and Sons"

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Playwright Terrence McNally talks about his play “Mothers and Sons,” along with stars Tyne Daly and Frederick Weller. The play is about a woman who pays an unexpected visit to the New York apartment of her late son's partner, who is now married to another man and has a young son. Challenged to face how society has changed around her, generations collide as she revisits the past and begins to see the life her son might have led. “Mothers and Sons” is playing at the Golden Theater.

Read More

Comments [4]

Jessie Mueller and Doug McGrath on "Beautiful: The Carole King Musical"

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Jessie Mueller, who plays Carole King in “Beautiful: The Carol King Musical,” talks about her role, along with Doug McGrath, who wrote the book for the show. It tells the story of how Carole Klein, an awkward teen living in Brooklyn, became a hit songwriter. She and her husband and songwriting partner Gerry Goffin become a songwriting powerhouse, churning out hits like “One Fine Day,” “Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow,” and “The Loco-Motion.” “Beautiful” is playing at the Stephen Sondheim Theatre.

Read More

Comments [3]

Sarah Jessica Parker in the Host's Chair

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Sarah Jessica Parker fills in for Leonard Lopate. On today’s show: New Yorker writer Dexter Filkins talks about the challenge of war reporting. Then, artist Alex Katz discusses his long career. Jessie Mueller talks about playing Carole King in the Broadway musical, “Beautiful,” along with Doug McGrath, who wrote the show’s book. And playwright Terrence McNally on his play, “Mothers and Sons,” along with stars Tyne Daly and Frederick Weller.

Read More

Food Insecurity and Hunger in America

Monday, April 14, 2014

For this week’s installment of our series Strapped: A Look at Poverty in America, Joel Berg, Executive Director of New York City Coalition Against Hunger talks about food insecurity, hunger, and obesity among the poor in New York and across the country.

The term “food insecurity,” Joel Berg said, “is the best description of hunger in American context. People rationing food, choosing between food and rent, choosing between food and health care, parents going without meals to feed their children, children sometimes having to go through the dumpsters in back of their school to get a meal.”

If people can’t afford enough food, they often end up buying cheap food. “There’s no question that hunger and obesity are flip sides of the same malnutrition coin. If you can’t afford healthier food which of often more expensive, if you live in a low-income neighborhood where you can’t even find healthier food, there’s no question that one of the top coping strategies is to buy less healthy, less expensive food that you can just fill your bellies, fill your kids’ bellies, more calories but its less healthy. That’s why we have this amazing irony in America: you can be food insecure, you can be hungry, you can be low-income, and you can still be overweight.”

Compared to other industrialized nations, the United States has the highest rate of food insecurity—49 million people, including 16  million children, live in food insecure households in this country. SNAP benefits (food stamps), WIC benefits, and free and reduced school lunch and breakfast are some of the federal programs that many food insecure families depend on. Berg said the recent cuts to SNAP benefits are having an impact, making it harder for food stamp recipients to buy enough food for the month.

Berg sees hunger as a political issue, and that reducing hunger requires advocacy and action. “If you really want to end hunger in America, you need to join with groups like New York City Coalition Against Hunger to fight for living wage jobs, to fight for an adequate safety net, to ensure that eligible families get the nutrition assistance they deserve,” Berg said. “And that’s what’s going to end this problem in America.”

Read More

Comments [11]

How Our Genes Change Our Lives—and Our Lives Change Our Genes

Monday, April 14, 2014

The human genome is far more fluid and fascinating than your ninth grade biology text book revealed. Dr. Sharon Moalem looks at what rare genetic conditions can teach us all about our own health and well-being. His book Inheritance: How Our Genes Change Our Lives—and Our Lives Change Our Genes is a wide-ranging and entertaining interdisciplinary approach to science and medicine-- explaining how art, history, superheroes, sex workers, and sports stars all help us understand the impact of our lives on our genes, and our genes on our lives.

Read More

Comments [5]

Genes, Going Hungry, and John Turturro as a Gigolo

Monday, April 14, 2014

Andy Borowitz fills in for Leonard Lopate. On today’s show: Find out how our lives shape our genes and how our genes shape our lives. Adam Begley discusses the life and work of the Pulitzer Prize-winning author John Updike. Our Strapped series continues with a look at the connection between poverty and food insecurity, hunger and obesity. John Turturro talks about writing, directing and starring in “Fading Gigolo.”

 

Read More

John Updike's Life and Writing

Monday, April 14, 2014

John Updike is one of the most celebrated writers in American literature. Adam Begley talks about his biography of the Updike—a candid, intimate, and richly detailed look at his life and work. Updike explores how Updike’s fiction was shaped by his tumultuous personal life—including his enduring religious faith, his two marriages, and his first-hand experience of the “adulterous society” he was credited with exposing in the bestselling Couples.

Read More

Comments [1]

John Turturro, “Fading Gigolo"

Monday, April 14, 2014

John Turturro talks about writing, directing, and starring in “Fading Gigolo.” The film is about people’s endless and never fully satisfying quest to find happiness through sex and love, and it features Woody Allen, who plays a man who helps develop a scheme to get out of debt by entering into the world’s oldest profession. Turturro will also talk about his role in the film “God’s Pocket,” directed by John Slattery and also starring Philip Seymour Hoffman, which will be released in May.

Read More

Comments [7]

The Stuff That Dreams (and Nightmares) Are Made Of

Friday, April 11, 2014

When we fall asleep, our brains invent incredibly realistic and memorable dreams. Sometimes those dreams are dark and terrifying, making falling asleep something to fear. On this week's Please Explain, we'll find out what goes on inside our brains as we sleep. Dr. Andrew Gerber, a Neuroscientist and Clinician at Columbia University, and David K. Randall, journalist and author of Dreamland: Adventures in the Strange Science of Sleep , explain the neuroscience of dreams and nightmares.

Why do we dream? Do dreams have a purpose? When the brain is asleep it's inundated by impulses and senses and experiences, and the brain puts them together. A necessary function of sleep, especially of REM sleep, is to consolidate the information that was gathered in the previous day and even in the more distant past, into coherent, long-term memories that get stored for later use. That's what dreams are. Dr. Gerber explained that the general scientific theory is that “Every night when we sleep our brains are consolidating what we should remember and letting go what we don’t.”

According to  Dr. William Domhoff, a professor at UC Santa Cruz who collected 50,000 dream logs, most dreams are by and large negative. “People are attacked, people don’t like you, it’s kind of like the worst days of middle school,” said David Randall.

Are dreams and nightmares different? Dreams that have the same basic structure—a narrative, imagery, a plot—have the same kind of neural substrate to them, whether they be positive or negative. When you wake up with a generally bad feeling but not with any recollection of a bad dream, it might mean that you had a dream with a different kind of structure that involved different parts of the brain.

 

Read More

Comments [23]

Anna Chlumsky on Keeping It Together on "Veep"

Friday, April 11, 2014

Anna Chlumsky talks about her Emmy-nominated role in the HBO comedy “Veep.” She plays Amy Brookheimer, the ambitious chief of staff to Vice President Selina Meyer, played by Julia Louis-Dreyfus.

Read More

Comments [3]

Guest Picks: Anna Chlumsky

Friday, April 11, 2014

Anna Chlumsky was on the Leonard Lopate Show recently to talk about her role in HBO's Veep. She also told us about the song that's become her personal anthem. Find out what else Anna Chlumsky's reading, watching and hearing...

Read More

Comment

Bad News about Pesticides

Friday, April 11, 2014

Reporter Susan Freinkel talks about what happens to brains of children who have been exposed at a young age to pesticides. She’s joined by Lee Fang, who reports on how the pesticide companies have influenced regulations in Washington and at the local level. Both Freinkel and Fang are contributors to The Nation magazine. Freinkel is the author of the book Plastic: A Toxic Love Story and her article Warning Signs: How Pesticides Harm the Young Brain and Fang’s article The Pesticide Industry vs. Consumers: Not a Fair Fight appear in the March 31, 2014, issue of The Nation magazine.

Find consumer guides about pesticides and produce and more at the Environmental Working Group's web site: ewg.org.

Read More

Comments [10]

Pesticides, Veep, and What Happens When We Sleep

Friday, April 11, 2014

Andy Borowitz fills in for Leonard Lopate. On today’s show: we’ll find out what happens to the children’s brains when they’re exposed to pesticides. Anna Chlumsky talks about her role on the HBO show, “Veep.” Isla Morley discusses her new novel, Above. And this week’s Please Explain is about dreams and nightmares.

Read More

Above, a Novel by Isla Morley

Friday, April 11, 2014

Isla Morley discusses her novel Above. It’s about a teenager who’s abducted by a survivalist and locked away in an aban­doned missile silo in Eudora, Kansas. At first, she focuses frantically on finding a way out, until the harrowing truth of her new existence settles in—the crushing loneliness, the terrifying madness of a captor who believes he is saving her from the end of the world, and the persistent temptation to give up.

Read More

Comment