Tom Huizenga

Tom Huizenga appears in the following:

One Feisty Victorian Woman's Opera Revived

Thursday, July 23, 2015

A skilled mountain climber who knew Tchaikovsky and Brahms, Ethel Smyth was a big personality whose politically charged opera The Wreckers gets its first fully staged production in the U.S.

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New Music From Iceland Steps Back In Time

Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Iceland might be small and isolated but the country's music scene is substantial, resonating far beyond the island nation. One Icelandic group that thrives on both new and old classical music is Nordic Affect. Formed in 2005, the quartet of women is equally at home playing 17th century dance music ...

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Jon Vickers, Intense Canadian Tenor, Dies At 88

Monday, July 13, 2015

With the death of Jon Vickers, opera has lost one of its most intense voices. The Canadian tenor, often hailed as one of the greatest opera singers of the 20th century, died Friday in Ontario. In a note to London's Royal Opera House, Vickers' family said he lost a prolonged ...

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Why Conductor Kirill Petrenko Fits The Berlin Philharmonic

Tuesday, July 07, 2015

When the Berlin Philharmonic chooses a new chief conductor, it's a big deal. In May the orchestra, often hailed as the world's finest, sequestered itself for a secret vote and some European papers likened the event to a papal conclave. That vote failed, but on June ...

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'Tristan Und Isolde,' The Love Story That Changed Opera For Good

Wednesday, June 10, 2015

Artistic revolutions are rarely born easy. They complained about cubism, they grumbled about the "talkies" — and boy, did they bellyache over Wagner's trailblazing operas, especially Tristan und Isolde, which debuted 150 years ago Wednesday.

A four-hour epic meditation on love and death, the opera was considered unperformable ...

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Evenly Odd: Carl Nielsen's Distinctive Symphonies

Tuesday, June 09, 2015

"Quirky" is a descriptor that seems to have stuck to Danish composer Carl Nielsen, born 150 years ago on June 9, 1865.

The late music critic Michael Steinberg said Nielsen was a "very great and very quirky composer at the same time." New York Philharmonic music ...

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High School Graduation Rates: The Good, The Bad And The Ambiguous

Tuesday, June 09, 2015

Officially, the U.S. has a high school graduation rate of 81 percent — a historic high.

But our months-long investigation, in partnership with reporters at 14 member stations, reveals that this number should be taken with a big grain of salt. We found states, cities and districts pursuing a ...

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Jason Vieaux And Yolanda Kondonassis: Tiny Desk Concert

Friday, May 22, 2015

We rarely invite Tiny Desk alumni back to the confines of Bob Boilen's work space, but we couldn't resist this time. Harpist Yolanda Kondonassis and Grammy-winning guitarist Jason Vieaux have both given solo Tiny Desk performances. Since then they've paired up for concerts and a new ...

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Drum Fill Friday, With Sō Percussion

Friday, May 22, 2015

May is international drum month! To celebrate, we bring you a discussion in percussion with a group of guys who will bang on almost anything (including a cactus). The members of Sō Percussion are the guest quizmasters for this week's Drum Fill Friday. Eric ...

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Bruce Brubaker's Flowing, Meditative Glass

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

In his new memoir, Words Without Music, Philip Glass tells the story of how he slugged a man in the jaw in Amsterdam. At a concert, a quarrelsome audience member climbed onto the stage and began banging on the composer's keyboard. That was in 1969, when ...

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Camané: Tiny Desk Concert

Friday, May 15, 2015

Great fado singers sound as if they carry the weight of the world's sadness. They don't just wear their hearts on their sleeves — they bare their souls.

Fado, which means "fate" in Portuguese, emerged from the gritty barrios and docks of Lisbon in the early 19th century ...

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Lang Lang Live At The Met Museum

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

For more than half of his 32 years, Lang Lang has been in the spotlight, as an international star and arguably the most crowd-pleasing classical pianist on the planet. From venues as diverse as the Beijing Olympics and Brazil's World Cup to New York's Central Park and Stockholm's ...

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András Schiff's Confessional Schubert

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Twenty years ago, pianist András Schiff did not hide his disdain for the fortepiano — the smaller, quieter precursor to the modern grand piano. In the liner notes of five separate Schubert albums Schiff released in the early 1990s, he wrote: "Schubert's piano music has luckily ...

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Flower Songs: A Springtime Opera Puzzler

Wednesday, May 06, 2015

Spring finally seems to have arrived with an abundance of flowers. In the old poem, it's April showers that bring May flowers. But in opera, flowers pop up for a variety of reasons, and not all of them are pretty. While operatic flowers can be enjoyed for their beauty, their ...

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Dazzling Trumpeter Rolf Smedvig Dies Suddenly

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Trumpeter Rolf Smedvig, praised for his beautiful tone and virtuosic style, died Monday afternoon at his home in West Stockbridge, Mass. The cause of death, according to his long-time manager Mark Z. Alpert, was a heart attack.

Perhaps best known as one of the founding members of the widely acclaimed ...

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Bang On A Can Riffs On John Cage

Friday, April 24, 2015

Life changed a lot after that day in 1877 when Thomas Edison spoke "Mary had a little lamb" into a contraption he called a phonograph and discovered he could reproduce sound. Back then, tinfoil cylinders captured just a few flickering moments. Today Wagner's entire Ring cycle fits on a 16GB ...

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Get Out And Hear Some New Music This Summer

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Now that the weather, at least in much of the country, has turned from polar to pollen vortex, it's time to start mapping out musical road trips. This year bodes well for exploring contemporary work. There are new-music meccas like California's Cabrillo, where all the music is current. At other ...

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Julia Wolfe Wins Music Pulitzer For 'Anthracite Fields'

Monday, April 20, 2015

Julia Wolfe, a composer associated with the New York music collective Bang on a Can, has won the Pulitzer Prize for music for Anthracite Fields. The Pulitzer jury described the piece as "a powerful oratorio for chorus and sextet evoking Pennsylvania coal-mining life around the turn ...

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The Hypnotic Groove Of Xenakis

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Percussionists back in Beethoven's day could be forgiven for feeling a little bored, waiting for the infrequent roll of the kettledrum or the occasional cymbal crash. But as orchestras grew bigger, percussionists got busier — even more so after World War I, when a new generation of composers ...

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Multifaceted Music Critic Andrew Porter Dies At 86

Friday, April 03, 2015

Andrew Porter, a renowned music critic and scholar and translator of opera, died early today in London's Chelsea and Westminster Hospital. His twin sister, Sheila Porter, told NPR his death was the result of complications from pneumonia. He was 86.

Among an unusually wide range of pursuits, Porter is perhaps ...

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