Tom Huizenga

Tom Huizenga appears in the following:

Sax Ed: The NPR Music Saxophone Quiz

Thursday, November 06, 2014

In November 1814, Col. Andrew Jackson marched on Pensacola, taking the Florida city away from Britain and Spain, while the Congress of Vienna was busy drawing new boundaries after the Napoleonic Wars. And 200 years ago today, in a little 10th-century town south of Brussels, Adolphe Sax was born.

Sax ...

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Ghosts In The Music: A Spooky Songs Quiz

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Where would Halloween be without ghosts — those wispy spirits either friendly or fiendish in disposition? They've haunted our consciousness for ages, thanks to appearances in visual art, literature, film and music. And now they've overrun this puzzler. From country and classical to rock and jazz, ghosts glide through these ...

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Danish String Quartet: Tiny Desk Concert

Saturday, October 25, 2014

An abundance of facial hair is not restricted to the sensitive male indie-rocker set. Three of the four players in the Danish String Quartet could easily pass for hipster Brooklyn beard farmers. "We are simply your friendly neighborhood string quartet with above average amounts of beard," the group's website says.

...

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After 200 Years, A Schubert Song Still Resonates

Sunday, October 19, 2014

Two hundred years ago today, a 17-year-old kid from Vienna wrote a song that would change the way composers thought about songwriting. That kid was Franz Schubert, and his song "Gretchen am Spinnrade" (Gretchen at the Spinning Wheel) put German art song — or lieder as ...

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Everything You Wanted To Know About Classical Music (But Weren't Afraid To Ask)

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

A few weeks ago, in an act of brazen thievery, your devoted NPR Classical hosts appropriated an idea from our colleague Bob Mondello, NPR's film critic. Each Friday he tweets movie suggestions for the weekend. Realizing we could easily capitalize on his brilliance (less work for ...

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If It's Not Scottish ... Classical Contributions Of The Scots

Friday, September 19, 2014

The votes are in. The people of Scotland have chosen to remain in the United Kingdom. To mark the historic occasion, a wee reminder of what the Scots have contributed to classical music is in order.

When British classical music gets mentioned, the big guns always come to mind — ...

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Gotta Know Mexico: A Mexican Music Puzzler

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Today is Mexican Independence Day. On Sept. 16, 1810, the Grito de Dolores ("Cry of Dolores") was delivered in the town of Dolores near the city of Guanajuato, marking the beginning of the Mexican War of Independence that ended Spanish rule.

To celebrate, we've got a few gritos ...

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Listen To The Atlanta Symphony While It's Locked Out — Again

Friday, September 12, 2014

Alas, it is déjà vu all over again for the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. At midnight Saturday, the ASO musicians and management failed to meet the deadline to agree on a new contract after eight months of negotiations. That means the players, while still employees of the orchestra, are effectively locked ...

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Enduringly Dramatic Italian Soprano Magda Olivero Dies At 104

Monday, September 08, 2014

One of the last great Italian divas, and one of opera's most thrilling voices, has finally gone silent. Soprano Magda Olivero died in Milan, Italy today, according to multiple media organizations including the newspaper La Repubblica. She was 104. Olivero never had a glitzy recording career, but she did have ...

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Great Expectations: A New Season of New Music

Wednesday, September 03, 2014

Musicologist and pianist Charles Rosen once quipped: "The death of classical music is perhaps its oldest continuing tradition." But it's tough to see much gloom when faced with the diversity of premieres and provocative programming around the country in the 2014-2015 season.

John Adams reboots the Thousand and One Nights ...

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A Surge Of Scarlatti Sonatas

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Three centuries ago a man named Domenico Scarlatti churned out an enormous number of keyboard sonatas — more than 550. Pianists, harpsichordists and even accordionists still can't get enough these inventive, bite-sized pieces.

A clutch of Scarlatti albums have appeared this year and more are on the way. ...

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Enigmatic Endings: A Farewell To Summer Quiz

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Well, it's happened again. Vacations are over. Kids are returning to school. "And where," you're wondering, "did my summer go?"

You can get the same feeling in music sometimes. No matter how long a piece is, its end might sneak up on you. Try this mysterious little quiz filled with ...

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Masters And Disasters: The Met Opera Quiz

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Now that the embattled Metropolitan Opera has surmounted most of its labor squabbles, it's time to take a break from reading about the rancorous negotiations. See how many of these nerdworthy Met questions you can answer. Score high and bellow out your best Wagnerian "Hojotoho!" Score low and ...

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Pacifica Quartet: Tiny Desk Concert

Monday, August 18, 2014

With this Tiny Desk Concert by the Grammy-winning Pacifica Quartet, we have the opportunity to explore the world of a single composer. With the arguable exception of Béla Bartók's six string quartets, it's generally accepted that the 15 by Dmitri Shostakovich are the strongest ...

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First Listen: Cameron Carpenter, 'If You Could Read My Mind'

Saturday, August 16, 2014

Don't let the spandex pants, bejeweled shoes and modified mohawk fool you: Cameron Carpenter is a serious musician. He's a modern-day throwback to the flamboyant virtuosos of the 19th century. Like Liszt or Paganini, Carpenter dazzles audiences with blazing technique, igniting enthusiasm for his music ...

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Soul-Searching Music From A Serene Desert Monastery

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Inspiration can come from unlikely places. For composer Robert Kyr, the silence of a desert monastery is key to the radiant music on his new disc of recent choral works performed by the vocal ensemble Conspirare and its director Craig Hella Johnson.

Kyr travels frequently to the Monastery of Christ ...

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Drum Fill Friday: Classical Headbanging Edition

Friday, August 08, 2014

Sooner or later it had to happen — an all-classical Drum Fill Friday. This week's puzzler proves that the world of Beethoven, Stravinsky and Bartók can serve up beats as thunderous as any double drummer metal band.

Try to identify the classical pieces that ...

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Ask Us Anything About Beethoven

Tuesday, August 05, 2014

What do you know about Beethoven? He wrote the Fifth Symphony (da da da dummmm ...) and he became deaf.

There's obviously a lot more to the man and his music, and one person who surely knows is composer and writer Jan Swafford. He's ...

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Meet The Cast Of The Met Opera's Labor Drama

Friday, August 01, 2014

Think opera plots are tough to follow? Try wading through the complicated drama playing out offstage at the Metropolitan Opera. At its most basic, it's the story of management and labor unions fighting over a supposedly dwindling pot of money. The deadline to solve the squabble before a ...

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The Great War At 100: Music Of Conflict And Remembrance

Monday, July 28, 2014

One hundred years after the start of World War I, hear a range of pop and classical music from artists of the era. Some music reflects the war's violence, some gives solace.

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