Kelly McEvers

Kelly McEvers appears in the following:

Former Air Force Pilot Has Cautionary Tales About Drones

Friday, May 10, 2013

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A Close-Up Of Syria's Alawites, Loyalists Of A Troubled Regime

Monday, April 08, 2013

The film on Syria's Alawite community isn't finished yet, but filmmaker Nidal Hassan's favorite scenes are beginning to take shape.

It opens with fireworks on New Year's Eve in Tartous, Syria. "May God preserve the president for us," one young man yells in a reference to Syrian leader Bashar Assad.

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Members Of Assad's Sect Break Ranks With Syrian Regime

Tuesday, April 02, 2013

The Alawites of Syria were a poor, little-known Shiite minority until longtime dictator Hafez Assad, a member of the sect, rose to power in 1970. His son, President Bashar Assad, is now fighting to maintain that power in a country that has risen up against him. Now, even some Syrian ...

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Revisiting Iraq: A Sister On The Edge

Friday, March 22, 2013

It's been 10 years since the U.S. invaded Iraq. This week we're taking a look back, revisiting voices you first heard on NPR in 2007. We brought you the story of two sisters who had lost their parents. The older sister wore conservative clothes and recited poetry. The younger sister, ...

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Face To Face With Death In Iraq

Thursday, March 21, 2013

On the 10th anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Iraq, NPR is catching up with some of the people we encountered during the war. In 2006, at the height of the violence, we brought you the story of a woman who performed the Muslim ritual of washing and preparing ...

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Baghdad, A Decade Later

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Ten years after the U.S.-led war in Iraq, NPR is looking at where the country stands now. NPR's Kelly McEvers recently visited Baghdad and offered this take on how the Iraqi capital feels today.

I think the single word that would best describe Baghdad these days is traffic. It ...

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Letters To My Dead Father

Saturday, March 16, 2013

Ten years after the U.S. invaded Iraq, NPR is taking a look back, revisiting people and places first encountered during the war. In 2006, NPR aired a story about a 9-year-old girl who loved her father so much, she wrote him letters to take to work with him. Even ...

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A Chat With A Radical Fighter In Syria

Saturday, March 09, 2013

The Islamist rebel group Jabhat al-Nusra has been secretive, keeping to itself and refusing to meet Western journalists. The group has been designated a terrorist organization by the Obama administration and was thought to be made up mostly of foreign fighters, working alongside Syrian rebels.

But lately, members are starting ...

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U.N. Envoy To Syria Heads To Damascus To Discuss Cease-Fire

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

This is Lakhdar Brahimi first serious attempt for peace. One of the issues he'll have to deal with is disarray among the rebels.

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As Syrian Peace Plan Crumbles, What's Next?

Thursday, May 10, 2012

Two deadly explosions on the outskirts of Damascus further undercut a peace plan for Syria. It's clear the current plan isn't working. But there's no consensus on what's the best alternative.

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Syrian Exiles Seek To Spread Word On Internet Radio

Monday, April 02, 2012

New Start Radio is an Internet radio station that was launched by a brother and sister team who fled their Syrian homeland. The station's reports come mostly from citizen journalists in hot spots around Syria.

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President Obama: All Troops Out Of Iraq By Dec. 31

Friday, October 21, 2011

Obama has always been opposed to the war in Iraq, and is fulfilling a campaign promise to bring the American involvement to an end. He says troop levels in Afghanistan will also be coming down.

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Unfinished Arab Revolutions

Tuesday, October 11, 2011

Kelly McEvers, Baghdad correspondent for NPR, talks about her time in Bahrain, Yemen and Syria and how the Arab Spring continues throughout the region.

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'The Other Iraq' Has Its Own Problems

Thursday, March 31, 2011

These days, it seems like there are two Iraqs.

There's the Iraq that we know, where Baghdad is the capital, and where low-level bombings and political infighting are the norm.

And then there's a place that tour groups are calling "the other Iraq": the semi-autonomous region of Kurdistan. There, the ...

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