Streams

Haley Richardson

Haley Richardson joined the New York Public Radio Archives department in 2010 to digitize, catalog, and present online hundreds of hours' worth of WNYC recordings from the 1930s to 1970s for a National Endowment for the Humanities-funded grant. Before coming to New York, Haley digitized and cataloged at National Public Radio in Washington, D.C., the Library of Congress in Culpeper, VA, and the Harry Ransom Center in Austin, TX. Now she lives in Brooklyn and writes about archives on the Internet.

Haley Richardson appears in the following:

Marya Mannes Unbuttons Minds

Monday, August 13, 2012

WNYC

In this 1965 broadcast of a Books and Authors Luncheon, critic Marya Mannes discusses American women, including the work of Helen Gurley Brown, who had recently achieved success with her book Sex and the Single Girl (1962).

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German Science Writer Willy Ley on 'Rockets, Missiles and Space Travel'

Monday, August 06, 2012

WNYC

On this 1957 broadcast of The New York Herald-Tribune Books and Authors Luncheon, the German-American scientist and science writer discusses satellite technology and the recent launch of Sputnik.

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Twenty-Four Years Later: Celebrating the 88th Anniversary of WNYC

Sunday, July 08, 2012

On Sunday, July 8, 2012, WNYC will mark 88 years on the air. Originally established as New York City's municipal radio station, WNYC has since become the flagship station for the country's public radio networks. In 1948, station founder Grover A. Whalen spoke briefly about what he believed to be WNYC's primary role in the lives of New York's residents.

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Larry Rivers Interviewed at the Tibor de Nagy Art Gallery, 1951

Saturday, April 28, 2012

In 1951, as part of WNYC's annual American Art Festival, arts commentator (and future host of WQXR's "This Is My Music"!) Lloyd Moss wandered through the rooms of the Tibor de Nagy Gallery at its original location, 206 E. 53rd Street. Along with gallery co-director John Myers, Moss explores the work of "unknown" artists and even runs into a young Larry Rivers, who explains to the WNYC audience the importance of the New York School of Painting and his own place within that movement.

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A New Year's Message from Mayor La Guardia

Saturday, December 31, 2011

On New Year's Eve, 1944, Mayor F. H. La Guardia devoted the first few minutes of his weekly "Talk to the People" broadcast to bidding a somber farewell to a harsh year of international war, domestic hardship and staggering loss of life. Listen to his short address to New York City citizens, delivered on the last day of a year many Americans were glad to see end.

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Merry Christmas To All, From Mayor La Guardia

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Americans had plenty to celebrate in December 1945. The Second World War had just ended in September, making this the first peacetime holiday season they had seen in several years. In his regular Sunday "Talk to the People" broadcast on Christmas weekend, Mayor Fiorello H. La Guardia recited the Nativity story and told New Yorkers to "resolve to live the spirit of Christmas."

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Archives Thanksgiving: Peppers and Zesty Cheese Croquettes

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

The second installment of the Archives' celebration of Thanksgiving continues today with a 1952 show focusing on cayenne peppers, featuring Mrs. Gannon, WNYC's Mistress of Markets. Tune in to learn all about incorporating this "pepper-upper" into your diets -- and be sure to catch her recipe for cheese croquettes!

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Senator John F. Kennedy on Overseas Press Club, 1957

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

WNYC

Three years before he was elected President of the United States, Massachusetts Senator John F. Kennedy won the Pulitzer Prize in Biography for his book Profiles in Courage, which he co-wrote with his adviser and speechwriter Ted Sorensen. The day the award was announced, May 6, 1957, Senator Kennedy addressed a special Overseas Press Club event honoring the accomplishments of members of the foreign press, which was broadcast over WNYC on May 31, 1957.

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Archives Thanksgiving: Healthy Vegetables in Tough Times

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

Howdy, Homemakers! Welcome to the first in a special holiday series of Annotations featuring a few culinary highlights from the WNYC radio collection. Today the crew at the Department of Markets brings you their program on "food and rationing with a silver lining," featuring the wisdom of Commissioner Daniel P. Wooley and the experience of Frances Foley Gannon, Director of the Bureau of Consumer Services.

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Celebrating the Charter of Flushing, 1945

Friday, October 07, 2011

On October 7, 1945, New York City's Mayor La Guardia solemnly celebrated the 300th anniversary of the Charter of the Town of Flushing from the historic home of John Bowne, who played a major role in abolishing New Amsterdam Director-General Peter Stuyvesant's limitations on religious freedom in the Dutch colony of New Netherland.

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Archives Mixtape: Water Conservation Jingle, 1949

Thursday, September 22, 2011

In 1949, the State of New York's Board of Water Supply was in the middle of constructing the Delaware Aqueduct as a means of augmenting New York City's water supply. During this time, residents and officials were deeply concerned with how all of the city's water was used -- or wasted.

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Museum of Modern Art Matisse Forum, 1951

Monday, August 22, 2011

The Museum of Modern Art's 1951 exhibition of paintings, sculptures, and drawings by French artist Henri Matisse nearly didn't happen. In this recording, broadcast over WNYC on the evening of November 15, 1951 (and with the artist's son in the audience), museum officials discussed the trouble the museum had in receiving the artworks and the importance of the materials presented.

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Books and Authors Luncheon: Rachel Carson, 1951

Friday, August 12, 2011

Before achieving national acclaim for her exposé of the chemical industry, Silent Spring (1962), marine biologist and nature conservationist Rachel Carson wrote prolifically about the world of the ocean. Her sea trilogy, Under the Sea Wind (1941), The Sea Around Us (1951), and The Edge of the Sea (1955), quickly made her a New York Times bestselling author and a literary star.

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Joseph Papp and Shakespeare in the Park, 1962 & 1965

Sunday, July 31, 2011

It's summertime in New York, which means theater lovers all over the city have been scrambling to get tickets to the Public Theater's near-daily Shakespeare in the Park performances. Today we celebrate the tradition with two archival recordings from the WNYC/Municipal Archives collection featuring Joseph Papp, founder of the Public Theater (and, later, Joe's Pub).

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Happy Fourth of July From Mayor La Guardia

Monday, July 04, 2011

Mayor La Guardia's weekly Talk to the People is one of our favorite programs here in the New York Public Radio Archives. It was broadcast every Sunday from January 1942 until he left office in December 1945. The primary purpose of these broadcasts was to keep New Yorkers up-to-date on the city administration and services.

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Happy Birthday, Brooklyn Bridge!

Friday, May 27, 2011

The Brooklyn Bridge is celebrating its 128th anniversary this week by undergoing heavy rehabilitation and causing problems for late-night borough-hoppers, a drastic change from its 60th anniversary celebrations, when the Bridge reminisced on WNYC with Public Works Commissioner Irving Huie about its grand opening and the changes it brought to Manhattan and Brooklyn.

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Henry Kissinger, 1958

Thursday, May 26, 2011

In this WNYC broadcast from 1958, a young Henry Kissinger discusses ways to correct the United States' loss of stature in the international community.

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Have Fun With Your Children, 1945

Sunday, May 08, 2011

"Ten o'clock each morning serves the housewife and the homemaker Monday through Saturday." So proclaims WNYC announcer Tommy Cowan at the beginning of the first presentation of "Have Fun with Your Children" (sometimes called "City Fun with Children"), a public affairs program produced specifically for mothers by author Becky Reyher. For three years, Ms. Reyher welcomed experts on local cultural events and educational programs into the studio to discuss ways to entertain children in the city. In honor of Mother's Day, we're taking a closer look at this show and its dynamic hostess.

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Operation: Clean Up, 1952

Friday, April 22, 2011

In 1952, the New York Department of Public Works opened up the Owl's Head Pollution Control Plant in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, one of three new plants designed to combat the massive pollution running in and around the city's public shores. But as this dramatization points out residents were conflicted about the impact the plant would have on their communities.

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Freedom's Ladder: WNYC and New York's Anti-Discrimination Law

Saturday, March 12, 2011

On March 12, 1945, when Governor Thomas E. Dewey signed in to law the Ives-Quinn Anti-Discrimination Bill, New York became the first state to enact legislation curtailing the practice of discriminating against job applicants and employees on the basis of race, religion, or creed.

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