Deborah Solomon

Deborah Solomon is the art critic for WNYC. Her reviews appear on Morning Edition and The Brian Lehrer Show. Solomon is a longtime contributor to The New York Times, and she is also a prize-winning biographer. Her books include Jackson Pollock: A Biography and Utopia Parkway: The Life and Work of Joseph Cornell. She is currently writing a biography of the artist Jasper Johns. She lives on the Upper West Side with her husband, Kent Sepkowitz, and their corgi, Belle, a frequent visitor to the American Museum of Natural History dog run.

Deborah Solomon appears in the following:

Review: Max Beckmann’s Brief But Intense New York Years

Friday, October 21, 2016

The Metropolitan Museum Atones for Henry Geldzahler’s Mistake.


Review: “Gay Gotham” Is a Catchy Title for an Art Show

Friday, October 14, 2016

A first of its kind exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York examines the history of gay culture in New York.


Review: 50 Shades of White

Friday, October 07, 2016

Agnes Martin, whose retrospective at the Guggenheim may be one of the two or three best shows in New York this season, is known as a 1970s Minimalist. She was anything but.


Review: Carmen Herrera is No Grandma Moses, Which Is a Good Thing

Friday, September 16, 2016

Plus "How to Get Free Art Swag!" At two new exhibits, one introduces you to an artist you should know (but probably don't). The other lets you touch the art, even take it home.


Review: A Brave Show on Art and AIDS

Friday, July 29, 2016

It should be at the Metropolitan Museum rather than the Bronx Museum.


Review: Diane Arbus’s Baby Photographs

Friday, July 15, 2016

A marvelous show of Diane Arbus’s early and never-seen work confirms her reputation as a total original. 

Comments [2]

Review: Photo Center Moves to the Bowery, But Has No Room for Pictures of Bums

Friday, June 24, 2016

The International Center of Photography rejects its own history in an effort to be digitally-correct.


Review: Stuart Davis at the Whtiney

Friday, June 10, 2016

A new exhibit of his work presents him as a forerunner of the artists like Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein.


Review: Holy Moholy!

Friday, May 27, 2016

A new exhibit at the Guggenheim explores the life's work of Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, an artist who defied every boundary.

Comments [4]

Review: Nicole Eisenman’s 'Al-ugh-ories'

Friday, May 06, 2016

The show inserts the "ugh" into all the "aah's" of art history and mingles humor with actual attempts at beauty. 

Comments [1]

Review: Sol LeWitt Collected the Art of Everyone But Sol LeWitt

Friday, April 29, 2016

Some of the best art collections are put together by artists who swap work with each other. A new exhibit at the Drawing Center presents the works LeWitt gathered over time.


Review: Edgar Degas’s Fingerpaintings

Friday, March 25, 2016

A new exhibit at MoMA reveals a more modern and experimental artist than his reputation suggests.


Review: Japan’s Photographers Remember 3-11

Friday, March 11, 2016

"In the Wake: Japanese Photographers Respond to 3/11" is an intelligent memorial commemorating the 5 year anniversary of Japan's triple disaster.

Comments [1]

Met Breuer Sneak Peek

Monday, March 07, 2016

Close your eyes and listen for a visual "sneak peek" of the Metropolitan Museum of Art's expansion to its third site, located at the former Whitney building on Madison at 74th Street.

Comments [3]

Review: More Than Just 'The Scream'

Thursday, February 18, 2016

Edvard Munch is perhaps best known for his image of a man caught in a swirl of agony. A new exhibit at the Neue Galerie explores the breadth of his work.


Review: Painter of the 1% (Before the Revolution)

Monday, February 15, 2016

The work of Vigée Le Brun is on view at the Met Museum of Art. It’s the first-ever retrospective in New York of the self-taught artist and the elite world she painted.


Review: Laura Poitras Exposes a New Secret: Her Art

Friday, February 05, 2016

Filmmaker, journalist — artist? The Whitney Museum offers new work by Laura Poitras, who is best known for helping intelligence analyst Edward Snowden leak state secrets.


Review: Drawing’s Golden Age in New York

Friday, January 29, 2016

Two new exhibits highlight the pleasure and thoughtfulness of drawings.

Comments [3]

Rocks for Non-Jocks

Friday, December 18, 2015

The Noguchi Museum explores the art of rocks and stones through the course of human history.

Comments [1]

Coney Island on my Mind

Friday, November 20, 2015

Most of us feel we know Coney Island, even if we've never spent much time there. The enduring memory of America's 'Dreamland' on display at the Brooklyn Museum.