Anya Kamenetz

NPR

Anya Kamenetz appears in the following:

Kids are losing school days to quarantines. Here's a way to keep them in classrooms

Friday, October 08, 2021

Test-to-stay policies could help keep students in in-person school. But amid a national shortage, rapid tests can be hard to come by, and the practice isn't common.

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Facebook's own data is not as conclusive as you think about teens and mental health

Wednesday, October 06, 2021

It's grabbed a lot of headlines, but the evidence on social media and teen mental health — including that Facebook and Instagram research — is far from a smoking gun.

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Hearing about Facebook was billed as focusing on protecting kids online

Wednesday, October 06, 2021

It's grabbed a lot of headlines, but the evidence on social media and teen mental health — including that Facebook and Instagram research — is far from a smoking gun.

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School boards are asking for federal help as they face threats and violence

Thursday, September 30, 2021

School board meetings, usually one of the most mundane examples of local democracy in action, have exploded with vitriol across the country in recent months, and many school leaders are scared.

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It's Back-To-School Season In NYC. Here's How 3 Moms Are Handling It

Monday, September 13, 2021

School districts are once again making enormous changes at the last minute. New York City, the nation's largest district, is one of the few holdouts against offering a remote option.

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Biden Dangles New Federal Funds For Schools That Defy Mask Mandate Bans

Thursday, September 09, 2021

On Thursday, the president announced a series of actions to encourage K-12 schools to mandate masks for all and require vaccines for employees.

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Hurricane Ida's Impact On Students Could Be Worse Than Katrina, Expert Says

Friday, September 03, 2021

Many New Orleans area students had re-enrolled in other schools within two weeks after Hurricane Katrina. This time, one expert predicts "five or six weeks of essentially no learning happening."

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National Survey Finds Severe And Desperate School Bus Driver Shortage

Wednesday, September 01, 2021

"In previous years, we've seen regionalized driver shortages, but nothing to the extent that we're seeing today," one researcher told NPR.

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A Picture Book About Children At The Border Aims To Spark Family Conversations

Monday, April 12, 2021

The new children's book Hear My Voice/Escucha Mi Voz pulls from the author's interviews with migrant children detained in U.S. facilities in 2019.

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Why So Many Asian Americans Are Learning Remotely

Friday, April 09, 2021

Multigenerational households and anti-Asian bullying may play a role.

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Asian Americans Most Likely To Be Learning Remotely

Thursday, April 08, 2021

Federal data suggests Asian Americans as the most likely to be learning remotely this year. Experts and community members say the reasons range from differing views of the pandemic to racist bullying.

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New Data Reveals School Attendance Numbers During The Pandemic

Wednesday, April 07, 2021

On Wednesday, the U.S. Education Department released the first set of national data on school attendance during the pandemic. Experts predicted chronic absenteeism has increased over the past year.

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COVID-19 Lockdowns Have Been Hard On Youth Locked Up

Monday, March 29, 2021

Juvenile incarceration is down, but many young people still in facilities have gone months without seeing their families.

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New Data Highlight Disparities In Students Learning In Person

Wednesday, March 24, 2021

The first federal survey on school reopening shows racial and geographic differences in participation in full-time, in person learning.

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The CDC Says A Distance Of 3 Feet Between Students In A Classroom Setting Is Safe

Friday, March 19, 2021

The CDC has updated its guidance for schools, saying it "now recommends that, with universal masking, students should maintain a distance of at least three feet in classroom settings."

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CDC Says Schools Can Now Space Students 3 Feet Apart, Rather Than 6

Friday, March 19, 2021

In many places, the 6-foot guidance was interpreted as requiring schools to operate on part-time schedules in order to reduce class sizes. A 3-foot rule would allow many more schools to reopen fully.

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The Latest Stimulus Package Includes $130 Billion For K-12 Education

Wednesday, March 17, 2021

American Rescue Package includes almost $130 billion for K-12 education. Some of the things it may be spent on are supplies, renovating buildings and helping with "learning loss" during the pandemic.

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A Year Of School Like No Other: How A Teacher, A Student And A Parent Have Coped

Thursday, March 11, 2021

We've talked with hundreds of people since the pandemic shut down schools and colleges a year ago. We checked back back in with three of them about how their lives have changed.

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Checking Back With A Teacher, College Student and Mother After A Year At Home

Wednesday, March 10, 2021

On the one year anniversary of COVID-19-related school closures, NPR checks back in with a teacher, a college student and the mother of a student with disabilities about how the year has gone.

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What The $300 A Month Child Benefit Could Mean For A Family On The Edge

Tuesday, March 09, 2021

The monthly checks would mark a big shift in the federal government's approach to child poverty. One study estimates they could cut the number of poor children by half.

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