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Soundcheck

Google's Big Music Plans; Caffe Lena; Swearin' Plays Live

Friday, November 08, 2013

In this episode: In the wake of the first YouTube Music Awards, and with Google planning a music subscription service, Rolling Stone's Steve Knopper talks about whether Google has a grand -- some would say nefarious -- plan to take over the music world.

Then, Saratoga Springs' Caffe Lena has been an integral part of the folk scene since the 1960's. Musician Pete Kennedy and Jocelyn Arem -- editor of a new book and box set -- discusses the musical history of the famed coffee house.

And power punk band Swearin' strips away its fuzzy and loud songs for a surprisingly intimate set in the Soundcheck studio.

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On The Media

THE FUTURE OF STREAMING VIDEO

Friday, August 30, 2013

As eyeballs continue to shift from TV to streaming online video, it remains doubtful that digital ad dollars will ever rival their analog predecessors. Meanwhile, companies like Netflix, Hulu, and YouTube continue to experiment with subscription and advertising models. Brooke sits down with Peter Kafka of All Things Digital, to ask him what the future holds for shows like Mad Men, and for YouTube stars like Ryan Higa.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

How YouTube Changes Everything

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Fortune's Miguel Helft talks about how YouTube has grown 50 percent this year and is making money and changing the media world. His story. “How YouTube Changes Everything” appears in the latest issue of Fortune magazine.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Assisted Living; Richard Russo's Memoir of His Mother; Mystery, Revenge, and Cheese; YouTube and the Media

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

A. C. Thompson talks about his year-long investigation into a multi-billion-dollar assisted-living company. Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Richard Russo on his complex relationship with his mother. Then, the story of a man who was lured to Spain by a famous cheese and its mysterious history. Plus, a look at what’s happened to YouTube since it was bought by Google in 2006, and whether the site could help transform entertainment.

WNYC News

One NY Artist: Actor and Video Producer Gary Lee Mahmoud

Saturday, July 20, 2013

There are thousands of artists in New York City. Some are famous internationally, while others are scratching out a living while perfecting their craft in basements or on stage. WNYC is bringing a few of them to the spotlight, in their own voices.

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Studio 360

The Trouble With Streaming Music

Friday, June 28, 2013

The title of David Lowery’s blog post said it all: “My Song Got Played On Pandora 1 Million Times and All I Got Was $16.89, Less Than What I Make From a Single T-Shirt Sale!” Lowery, the singer and songwriter from Camper Van Beethoven and Cracker, posted that article on ...

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Radiolab

The Little Metronome That Wouldn't

Monday, May 20, 2013

Take a metronome. Then take another. Then another. Set them ticking at different times. Look. Lift. (That's the key part.) Watch. Then Laugh. Because you will be dumbfounded.

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On The Media

The Future of Streaming Video

Friday, May 10, 2013

As eyeballs continue to shift from TV to streaming online video, it remains doubtful that digital ad dollars will ever rival their analog predecessors. Meanwhile, companies like Netflix, Hulu, and YouTube continue to experiment with subscription and advertising models. Brooke sits down with Peter Kafka of All Things Digital, to ask him what the future holds for shows like Mad Men, and for YouTube stars like Ryan Higa.

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Soundcheck

Contractually Obligated Creativity; Nataly Dawn Shows Her Dark Side; Musical Hoaxes

Monday, April 01, 2013

In this episode:  

• When Bang Records held singer Van Morrison to his contract and forced him to produce another album for the label – they ended up with songs like “Ring Worm” and “Want a Danish.” We take a look at how artists have dealt with their contractual disagreements – from Marvin Gaye to Lou Reed.

• Plus, singer-songwriter Nataly Dawn is one half of the perky, wide-eyed, YouTube-famous duo Pomplamoose. She comes in-studio to play a subdued set of songs off of her solo debut, How I Knew Her.

• And: APRIL FOOLS’! We revisit a discussion about musical hoaxes and trickery from John Flansburgh of They Might Be Giants. (Seriously. That part is not a joke.)

Soundcheck

Robyn Hitchcock; Musical Top Dogs; YouTube Shakes Up Billboard's Hot 100

Monday, February 25, 2013

In This Episode: English troubadour and former leader of The Soft Boys Robyn Hitchcock plays songs from his upcoming album, Love From London.

Plus: We talk with New York Times bestselling authors Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman about competition in the music world -- and the science behind why some musicians deal with it better than others.

And: We learn about YouTube’s new role in calculating Billboard’s Top 100 singles chart. 

Soundcheck

Billboard Shakes Up The Charts With YouTube

Monday, February 25, 2013

Billboard magazine, which has charted popular music for decades, announced that it will now count YouTube views when tabulating the Hot 100 singles. The means that viral videos can now top the charts -- just in time for Baauer’s 'Harlem Shake' to debut at #1. Joining us to explain the change is Billboard's director of charts, Silvio Pietroluongo

 

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WNYC News

YouTube Joins Billboard Rankings

Thursday, February 21, 2013

The video-sharing service YouTube is now part of the Billboard Ratings.

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On The Media

Machinima

Friday, February 08, 2013

YouTube "networks" that specialize in niche content have created a lucrative business model that relies on vacuuming up the content of independent artists' and giving them a cut of the advertising profits. But some of these networks have begun to sign their talent to restrictive and exploitative contracts. Brooke talks to Tessa Stuart, who wrote about the plight of YouTube creators in LA Weekly.

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Soundcheck

'Hava Nagila': From Ukraine To YouTube

Monday, September 24, 2012

A new exhibit at the Museum of Jewish Heritage charts the surprising history of the universally familiar, if not universally popular song, "Hava Nagila." Curator Melissa Martens shares the story of the Jewish tune, and its journey from Ukraine to YouTube. Plus, check out a playlist of some of our favorite versions of the song. And -- tell us what you think of Hava Nagila.

 

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On The Media

Why Are All the Religious References in "Innocence of Muslims" Dubbed? [UPDATED]

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

I had been avoiding watching the inflammatory video posted on YouTube that has sparked anger and violence in Egypt and Libya this week (I had no interest in giving the nonsensical film any more attention than it has already been getting). But we are a media analysis show, and here at OTM we started doing some of our own digging into how this little known movie by a guy in California managed to get the attention of people on the other side of the world. As part of that research, one of my colleagues asked me to compare the original English trailer with a version dubbed in Arabic. Clips of the Arabic version had been shown on Egyptian television, and we were trying to see if the translation was accurate. From the clips that I saw, the translations seemed fine, but what I discovered was far more interesting than an inaccurate translation.

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On The Media

Syrian Rebels Appeal to Donors Through Video

Friday, July 27, 2012

With limited foreign media on the ground in Syria, our picture of the conflict is being assembled largely through citizen videos posted online and Syrian government television. Added to the mix is a new type of video made by rebels, aimed at getting funding from donors abroad. Brooke speaks to NPR Middle East correspondent Deb Amos about making videos in order to get weapons.

The Weeknd - Thursday

 

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The Takeaway

A Conversation with Your 12-Year-Old Self

Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Filmmaker Jeremiah McDonald of Portland, Maine, is the creator of the latest viral sensation where he sits down for a conversation with his 12-year-old self. What would you say to your 12-year-old self?

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WNYC News

Taking a Page From TV, YouTube Makes a Pitch to Advertisers

Wednesday, May 02, 2012

YouTube now gets four billion views a day, and that’s the audience parent-company Google will be pitching to advertisers Wednesday during the YouTube Brandcast at the Beacon Theater, where agencies and marketers will get a first-look at YouTube’s new, original programming.

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On The Media

YouTube's Reply to the "Reply Girls" and Other Irrelevant Videos

Friday, April 06, 2012

OTM recently looked at the phenomenon of "Reply Girls," the cleavage baring women crowding YouTube with nonsensical videos. YouTube says it is trying to fix the problem of irrelevant videos on its site. Bob speaks to YouTube engineering director Cristos Goodrow about how the site is changing its algorithm to show users more of what they want to see.

 

Smog - Held

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