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Yemen

The Takeaway

Yemeni Forces Attack Protesters with Guns, Trucks and Bulldozers

Monday, May 30, 2011

Forces loyal to Yemen's embattled president Ali Abdullah Saleh opened fire on protesters in the city's liberation square killing several and wounding many more. Liberation square has been at the center of Yemen's protest movement with the county's initial protests beginning their in the wake of the Tunisian and Egyptian revolutions. Dr. Abdulkadir al-Gunaid is a doctor in Yemen. He has been following news of the protests in Taizz. He says that the hospital has been looted and that the forces have damaged everything.

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The Takeaway

'War Zone' in Sanaa, Yemen as Crisis, Fighting Intensifies

Thursday, May 26, 2011

Fighting has intensified in the capital city of Yemen, Sanaa, where parts of the city are being called “a warzone” by international journalists. There are reports that at least 100 people have been killed in the violence. On Wednesday, opposition tribesmen controlled at least the trade and tourism ministries as well as the building which houses the country's state-run news agency, Saba. Is it possible that President Ali Abdullah Saleh will weather the storm? Robert Worth, correspondent for The New York Times, has been following the crisis. Hakim Almasmari, editor of the Yemen Post reports in Sanaa.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Update on Yemen

Thursday, May 12, 2011

While protests have continued across Syria for days, security forces in three cities across Yemen fired on protesters on Wednesday. In the capital city of Sana’a, there were reports that at least six had died and about 100 were wounded. Jeb Boone, a special correspondent for the Washington Post, joins us from Yemen to describe yesterday’s violence and what it means for the protest movement there.

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The Takeaway

This Week's Agenda: Middle East, Oil, Federal Reserve, Royal Wedding

Monday, April 25, 2011

Despite promises of reform from both the Syrian and Yemeni governments, demonstrations — and serious bloodshed — rage in both countries. NATO continues to support the rebels in Libya while some U.S. Senators call for Gadhafi's ouster. Marcus Mabry, editor-at-large of the International Herald Tribune, looks at protests throughout the Middle East and NATO's role in Libya. Middle East turmoil has also led to rising oil and gas prices in the U.S. Oil companies are set to release their earnings this week and Charlie Herman, economics editor for The Takeaway and WNYC, looks at rising oil profits and potential price gouging investigations.

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The Takeaway

3 Dead in Clashes in Yemen, Protests Continue

Wednesday, April 20, 2011

Protesters in Yemen continue to demand that President Ali Abdullah Saleh step down. Three people died and dozens were wounded in the unrest yesterday and more than 120 people have been killed in the protests in recent months. UN Security Council members have called for restraint and dialogue between protesters and authorities in Yemen. However, the council's first talks on the crisis ended in New York without an agreed public statement, with diplomats saying Russia objected. Hakim Almasmari, editor of The Yemen Post reports that despite the violence, 2.5 million people are expected to march today.

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The Takeaway

Fighting for Change in Yemen

Monday, April 18, 2011

Tensions are escalating in Yemen, where thousands have protested the rule of President Ali Abdullah Saleh, who remains in power. In the meantime, violence is worsening, parts of the country have fallen out of the government's control and Yemen's economy is collapsing. A correspondent for the BBC reports on some changes that Yemenis are seeing.

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The Takeaway

Yemen Sees Continued Protests

Friday, April 15, 2011

An estimated three million people are expected to participate in protests in Yemen today. Laura Kasinof has been reporting for The New York Times from Yemen and she has the latest on the protests. Each Friday for the past three weeks, over 100 thousand people have been protesting after prayers. At the same time, there's a pro-government rally that happens each Friday, with supporters bussed in. Is there still possible change for Yemen?

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Ali Abdullah Saleh

Thursday, April 07, 2011

Despite 32 years of near absolute rule, the regime of President Ali Abdullah Saleh is teetering. A rapidly intensifying protest movement, along with an insurgency in the north and a secessionist movement in the south have put Yemen on the brink of unraveling. Christopher Boucek, an associate in the Carnegie Enowment for International Peace’s Middle East program, looks at how President Saleh has kept a grip on power, even as ambassadors from the six Gulf Cooperation Council countries meet opposition representatives in Saudi Arabia to work on negotiating a deal for his exit.

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The Takeaway

US Shifts Position in Push for Yemen President to Step Down

Tuesday, April 05, 2011

In Tunisia, Egypt and Libya, the choice to support protesters and put political pressure on those countries' leaders to step down seemed like relatively easy political decisions for the Obama administration. But in Yemen, it has been more complicated for the U.S. to come out in direct opposition to Ali Abdullah Saleh and his 30 year rule. Yemen has been a key ally in the fight against al-Qaida in the country, and during the uprisings there, President Obama had maintained his support for Saleh behind closed doors.

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The Washington Report

Yemen's President, Iran and the Middle East Uprisings, President Obama and the Economy

Monday, April 04, 2011

NYT's David Sanger weighs in on Yemen's president, U.S. diplomacy and military action in the Middle East, and how economic indicators will come into play in President Obama's re-election campaign.

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The Takeaway

Moral Imperatives in the Middle East

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

In his address to the nation on Monday, President Barack Obama explained the rationale behind sending US military troops to Libya. In describing the situation, the President reminded Americans that "If [America] waited one more day, Benghazi, a city nearly the size of Charlotte would suffer a massacre that would have reverberated across the region and stained the conscience of the world. It was not in our national interests to let that happen. I refused to let that happen.But what if it happens in other countries, like Yemen?

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The Takeaway

Competing Demonstrations in a Divided Yemen

Friday, March 25, 2011

There are protests from both pro and anti-government groups in Sana'a Yemen, Friday, as President Ali Abdullah Saleh vowed to "stand firm" in the face of calls for his resignation. Defections of high-level government officials has indicated that the opposition movement was gaining ground, but so far the president has refused to step down. Laura Kasinof, has been reporting from Sana'a for The New York Times. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Unrest in Yemen Leading Toward Civil War?

Monday, March 21, 2011

"I think, I really fear, that the countdown to civil war in Yemen has just begun. It’s not just about protests in Yemen. You have some major defections by army generals in the last 24 hours. You have internal divisions within the ruling party of Pres. Ali Abdullah Saleh. Some elements from his own tribe are calling for him to step down. You have now a military standoff between special forces led by his son and the first division of the army of which the generals, some of his closest generals, have defected. You have turmoil engulfing most of the Yemen. You have a separatist movement in the South; you have a tribal insurgency in the North. But most important of all, I would argue, the new democratic revolt that has been sweeping the Arab world has reached Yemen with a vengeance."

Fawaz Gerges, professor of Middle Eastern Politics and International Relations at the London School of Economics. For more of the interview, click here

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The Takeaway

Another Revolution for Yemen?

Monday, March 21, 2011

Revolution may be coming quickly to Yemen. The country's president, Ali Abdullah Saleh, is losing support. A division of the Army says it will now protect protesters who have been calling for the president's resignation. Tanks and armored vehicles under the command of three generals who have defected this morning have positioned themselves in the main square and outside the Presidential Palace. Gregory Johnsen, a Yemen expert at Princeton University and Hakim Almasmari, editor of the Yemen Post newspaper discuss a country on the brink of change.

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The Takeaway

Uprising in Yemen

Monday, March 21, 2011

Protests continue in Yemen. Yemen's President Ali Abdullah Saleh fired his cabinet on Sunday, two days after government-linked forces shot and killed protesters. The president has received criticism from the United States and a division of the Yemen's military has allied itself with protesters. Laura Kasinof is reporting for The New York Times from Sanaa, Yemen.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Continuing Protests Across the Middle East

Monday, March 21, 2011

The protests in Yemen and Bahrain have turned violent over the past week. Fawaz Gerges, professor of Middle Eastern Politics and International Relations at the London School of Economics, and Mustapha K. Al-Sayyid, professor of political science at The American University in Cairo and director of the Center for the Study of Developing Countries at Cairo University, describe the government reaction to the protests, how other governments in the region are reacting to the unrest, and where the protest movements go from here.

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Soundcheck

Picks of the Week

Friday, March 11, 2011

This week’s picks bring us torchy pop from Sweden and soulful music from Yemen via Israel. 

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The Takeaway

Yemeni Protesters Get New Support

Wednesday, March 02, 2011

It's been over a month since protesters took to the streets of Sanaa, Yemen's capital city, calling for the removal of President Ali Abdullah Saleh. Opposition parties have joined the demonstrations and have said they would reject any offer from Saleh to form a unity government. Protesters also received support from Sheikh Abdul-Majid al-Zindani, who the U.S. believes has links to al-Qaida, and has called for an Islamic state to replace Yemen's current government.

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It's A Free Country ®

Comments Roundup: Voices of Arab New Yorkers

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

WNYC

On the Brian Lehrer Show today, North African and Middle Eastern New Yorkers called in with thoughts and feelings about the uprisings raging across the region. Plus, Debbie Almontaser, an educator and board chair of the Muslim Consultative Network whose brother lives in Yemen, discussed her views on what's happening in the Middle East.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Open Phones: Middle Eastern New Yorkers

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Listeners, what have you been hearing from your contacts in the Middle East region? Call us with your thoughts and feelings about the uprisings there. Plus, Debbie Almontaser, an educator and board chair of the Muslim Consultative Network, whose brother lives in Yemen, will discuss her views on what's happening in the Middle East. 

→ Read a Recap and Join the Conversation at It's A Free Country