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Yemen

The Takeaway

Sheryl WuDunn on This Year's Nobel Peace Prize Winners

Friday, October 07, 2011

Three women were awarded the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, becoming the first women to win since 2004. Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Leymah Gbowee, also of Liberia, and Tawakul Karman of Yemen will share the award. The Norwegian Nobel committee honored the three women for "their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women's rights to full participation in peace-building work." Johnson Sirleaf is the first democratically-elected female head of state in Africa, Gbowee is an activist, and Karman is a leading figure in Yemen's pro-democracy movement.

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The Takeaway

Three Women Awarded Nobel Peace Prize

Friday, October 07, 2011

Three women were awarded the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, becoming the first women to win since 2004. Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Leymah Gbowee, also of Liberia, and Tawakul Karman of Yemen will share the award. The Norwegian Nobel committee honored the three women for "their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women’s rights to full participation in peace-building work." Johnson Sirleaf is the first democratically-elected female head of state in Africa, Gbowee is an activist, and Karman is a leading figure in Yemen's pro-democracy movement.

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The Takeaway

Qaeda Leader Anwar al-Awlaki Killed in Yemen

Friday, September 30, 2011

Leading Al Qaeda figure Anwar al-Awlaki was killed in Yemen, according to government officials in the country. Al-Awlaki is connected with many plots against Americans including the failed Christmas Day bombing of 2009, the foiled Times Square car bombing, and the Fort Hood shootings. The American-born Al Qaeda leader was a target of an American operation for months although it is unclear if American forces were involved in the operation. U.S. officials did not have an immediate comment.

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The Takeaway

How Important was Anwar al-Awlaki?

Friday, September 30, 2011

He was perhaps the Obama Admnistration's most wanted terrorist figure. The CIA reportedly was given the green light to assassinate him, his death has been reported in the past at least twice, he some say he is linked in some way to terrorist attacks and attempts going back 10 years. And it appears this morning that the U.S. born Islamic cleric Anwar Al-Awlaki has finally met his end somewhere in the dusty wilderness of Yemen. A defense ministry official in Yemen confirmed his death early this morning.

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The Takeaway

Role of the CIA in Yemen

Friday, September 30, 2011

We continue our coverage of the death of Anwar Al-Awlaki, the U.S.-born cleric killed early this morning in northern Yemen. It is still not clear whether the operation was carried out by Yemeni forces or American intelligence but the CIA has had the greenlight to target the leading terrorist figure. Joining us is Eric Schmitt, terrorism correspondent for our partner The New York Times and co-author, along with The Times' Thom Shanker of the book "Counterstrike: the Untold Story of America's Secret Campaign Against Al Qaeda".

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The Takeaway

What is America's Influence in the Middle East?

Monday, September 26, 2011

Yemen is the latest country in the Arab world to see violence between protesters and police lead to bloodshed and deaths. 18 protesters were killed over the weekend, as Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh announced a special election to transfer power. As revolution sweeps through the Middle East, we're looking at the influence the United States has on these areas.

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The Takeaway

Yemeni Government Responds to Reports of Crackdown in Sanaa

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

More than 60 people have reportedly been killed in a crackdown by the Yemeni government against protesters in the capital of Sanaa. Yemen's minister of trade and industry, Hisham Sharaf Abdullah responds to the reports, and claims they have been fabricated.

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The Takeaway

Top of the Hour: Yemen Cracks Down on Civil Unrest, Morning Headlines

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

More than 60 people have been killed in a crackdown by the Yemeni government against protesters in the capital of Sanaa. Hakim Almasmari, editor in chief of The Yemen Post, reports on the latest.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Backstory: Continuing Unrest in Yemen

Thursday, August 18, 2011

As a brutal crackdown on protesters continues in Syria, the unrest in Yemen has slipped from the headlines. On today’s Backstory, Fawaz Gerges, a professor of Middle Eastern Politics and International Relations at the London School of Economics, describes what’s happened in the drought-stricken, poor country over the last few weeks, including the formation of a national council by those opposed to President Ali Abdullah Saleh.

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The Takeaway

Which Country Will Define Arab Spring?

Thursday, June 09, 2011

In watching the developments across the Middle East region, there seem to be one of two paths that nations experiencing the Arab Spring can take. Although 800 Egyptians died in revolts leading up to the removal of Hosni Mubarak’s long-standing regime, the country is now on a path toward more democratic rule. The same can’t be said for Libya, Syria or Yemen where entrenched regimes—or a solitary figure, in the case of Muammar Gadaffi—refuse to cede power.

While some call Egypt and Tunisia the shining model for the Arab Spring’s revolutions — isn’t it more accurate to see it as an exception to the rule of civil war? 

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The Takeaway

US Steps Up Covert War Effort in Yemen

Thursday, June 09, 2011

As the unrest in Yemen continues, several different parties are vying to fill a potential power vacuum in the country, including the US. Over the past month, Washington has expanded the number of air and drone attacks in Yemen in an attempt to prevent Al-Qaeda-affiliated militants from establishing a foothold in the country. Meanwhile, American and Saudi spies are reportedly ramping up intelligence collection efforts inside Yemen. Both countries have a strategic interest in preventing Yemen from becoming a failed state.

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The Takeaway

Heavy Fighting Rocks Yemen

Tuesday, June 07, 2011

There have been continued reports of heavy clashes in Yemen between troops and suspected al-Qaida gunmen in the south of the country. Meanwhile, Ali Saleh remains in medical care in Saudi Arabia. The BBC's Lina Sinjab reports from Sanaa. She says that it's still challenging to get a clear picture of what is happening outside of the country's capital.

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The Washington Report

Obama Administration Considers Faster Withdrawal from Afghanistan

Monday, June 06, 2011

NYT's David Sanger weighs in on a potential troop reduction in Afghanistan, American interests in Yemen, and the latest unemployment figures.

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It's A Free Country ®

Melinda Henneberger Sets Washington's Week

Monday, June 06, 2011

In a way she’s doing exactly what she promised, because she promised that this trip around America would be to get us talking and remembering and being grateful for American history, and I can’t remember when Paul Revere got more ink than he has since Sarah Palin started talking about him.

Melinda Henneberger, contributing editor to Time.com, on The Brian Lehrer Show.

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The Takeaway

Yemen: Is This the End of Saleh?

Monday, June 06, 2011

Yemen's embattled president, Ali Abdullah Saleh has been flown to Saudi Arabia for medical treatment leaving a hole in its leadership. The main opposition group says it backs a transfer of power to the vice president in line with a deal that international mediators have been trying to broker for months. Hakim Almasmari, Editor in Chief of the Yemen Post and correspondent for the Wall Street Journal says that Saleh's son is currently taking control, not the vice president. Gregory Johnsen, a Yemen expert at Princeton University says that it's "Saleh's son, Ahmed, and a quartet of nephews who have men with guns who are still loyal to them and they can be a force for a lot of chaos."

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The Takeaway

Yemen in Upheaval as Leader Goes to Saudi Arabia

Monday, June 06, 2011

Jubilant crowds took to the streets in Yemen over the weekend, celebrating the departure of President Ali Abdullah Saleh. Following a rocket attack on his compound on Friday, Saleh was flown to the Saudi Arabian capital of Riyadh on Saturday to have wood splinters surgically removed from his chest. Vice President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi has taken over for the interim, and international leaders are calling on Ali Abdullah Saleh to step down. But it's unclear whether the man who ruled the country with an iron fist for 33 years will try to return – and if not, what will happen in the power vacuum.

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Unrest in Yemen

Monday, June 06, 2011

Robert Powell, a Middle East analyst for The Economist Intelligence Unit, discusses the latest in Yemen, where an attack has injured President Saleh, and where the threat of Al-Qaeda looms in the background of instability. 

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The Takeaway

Yemen: Update on Fighting in Sanaa

Wednesday, June 01, 2011

In Yemen, tribal fighters have occupied a number of government buildings in the capital city, Sanaa, including the headquarters of the ruling party and a house of parliament. Nasser Arrabyee has been reporting from Sanaa for The New York Times. Beginning Tuesday evening, "the clashes intensified very, very much when missiles were fired at the headquarters at the defected troops in Sanaa. After that, there were a lot of clashes in the area around the palace of the tribal leader, Hamid al-Ahmar," reports Arrabyee. These clashes resulted in the killing of 30-40 people from both sides.

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The Takeaway

'It Sure Looks Like Civil War to Me,' Nicholas Kristof on Yemen

Tuesday, May 31, 2011

The UN Human Rights office has said that it received reports that at least 50 people have been killed in Taiz since Sunday. Forces loyal to President Ali Abdullah Saleh also bombed the city of Zinjibar with airstrikes after Islamic militants had overtaken the city.Nasser Arrabyee is in Sanaa, Yemen reporting for The New York Times. He says that "many of the protesters are peaceful, but the majority of the protesters belong to the Islamist party." Nicholas Kristof, columnist for The New York Times says that the fighting looks like a civil war to him, but that intervention is not an option. "The problem with intervention is that one reason why al-Qaida and Islamists have already grown pretty strong is because of real resentment at what they see as American influence there."

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The Takeaway

Yemen: Update on Fighting Between Islamists and Ali Saleh's Forces

Monday, May 30, 2011

In Yemen, Islamist militants have been fighting to control cities in Southern Yemen and the government airforce has responded with airstrikes. Monday morning, soldiers loyal to President Ali Abdullah Saleh stormed a protest camp in the city of Taiz, Yemen killing 20 protesters. In the coastal city of Zinjibar, residents reported seeing warplanes and military shelling. Laura Kasinof has been reporting on the protests in Yemen for The New York Times.

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