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Yahoo

Money Talking

Now Yahoo Will Have to Stand On its Own

Friday, January 30, 2015

CEO Marissa Mayer announced that Yahoo will spin off its $40 billion stake in Alibaba. Now she has to prove her plan to turn around the struggling company will work.

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Money Talking

What's in Store for Business in 2015

Friday, January 02, 2015

The U.S. economic recovery was a global bright spot last year, as Europe, China and the oil states all experienced setbacks and slowdowns. So what stories will shape 2015?

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New Tech City

7 Things New Yorkers Need to Know About the Tumblr Deal

Monday, May 20, 2013

Forget about Yahoo and Silicon Valley for a minute. How do the people who matter here in New York City — tech people and Tumblr users — feel about Yahoo's $1.1 billion acquisition of the social blogging platform?

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The Takeaway

Yahoo to Buy Social Media Site Tumblr

Monday, May 20, 2013

Users of the photo rich blogging and social media site Tumblr aren't happy. Yahoo has plans to buy the site for $1.1 billion dollars in an all cash deal which extends the brand of Yahoo into this social media space. The deal would be one of the largest acquisitions of a social networking company in years. 

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New Tech City

In Boost for Silicon Alley, Yahoo to Buy Tumblr for $1.1B

Monday, May 20, 2013

The board of the long-faltering tech giant Yahoo has reportedly agreed to pay $1.1 billion for Tumblr, a New York-based social blogging platform with more than a hundred million blogs and a young, engaged user base. The deal might just make Yahoo hip again. So, what does it mean for Tumblr and the Silicon Alley startup scene here in New York? New Tech City host Manoush Zomorodi explains on Morning Edition. 

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The Brian Lehrer Show

Yahoo! For Tumblr

Monday, May 20, 2013

Yahoo agreed to purchase the blogging site Tumblr for $1.1 billion. Sam Biddle, blogger for Valleywag, explains the site and the purchase. Do you use Tumblr?

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New Tech City

A Tumblr Boost for Silicon Alley?

Friday, May 17, 2013

New York City's tech scene is on fire, but it has yet to produce a Facebook, a Google or an Amazon. But now Yahoo is in talks to acquire Tumblr, the micro-blogging service that's a Silicon Alley darling. What does that mean for investors, Tumblr users and the other startups in New York?

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New Tech City

NYC Women in Tech on Equality, Work-Life Balance

Tuesday, March 05, 2013

This week on New Tech City, Anna Sale talks to women in New York City's tech scene about what they think of the messages coming down from on high.

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New Tech City

What NYC Tech Women Think of Sheryl + Marissa

Monday, March 04, 2013

So guess who’s leading the debate about women, equality, and work-life balance? Turns out it’s two high-powered women in tech. Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer recently banned working from home and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg has a book coming out on March 11 that urges women to push harder and "lean in" to their careers.

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Money Talking

Money Talking: Stock Market Rises as Sequester Looms

Friday, March 01, 2013

The Dow is hovering near record highs even as massive federal spending cuts are coming.  Is there a bubble in the making?

+ Hospitals, Researchers to be Hard Hit by Sequester

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The Brian Lehrer Show

The Changing Work-Life Balance

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Lisa Belkin, Huffington Post’s senior columnist on life/work/family, talks to Brian Lehrer about the new policy at Yahoo! that you may no longer work from outside the office, and the "Lean In Initiative" launched by Sheryl Sandberg of Facebook.

Live Event: How Tech is Changing the Way Women Work

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Transportation Nation

Uncovered: The Secret Routes of Silicon Valley Company Shuttles

Thursday, December 27, 2012

@jimgreer posted this photo of a Google bus on Twitter: "@google bus stuck at 23rd and Chattanooga."

(Queena Kim - Marketplace) By now you’ve heard about the perks that come with working in Silicon Valley. Free lunch, 20 percent time -- that’s the work time you can use to pursue independent projects.

Well, another perk? A private bus that picks you up in your neighborhood in San Francisco and shuttles you down to your corporate campus about an hour south in the suburbs of Silicon Valley.

During rush hour in San Francisco, you see them everywhere, said Eric Rodenbeck, the creative director of Stamen Design in the Mission District of San Francisco.

“They’re just so big," Rodenbeck says. "These buses are two stories high and they’re barrelling down residential streets, and no one knows where they’re going except the people who are on them.”

Rodenbeck is talking about the private shuttle buses that run up and down the Peninsula. They look like fancy tour buses. Google’s buses are white. Facebook’s are a sleek blue. But beyond that, they’re sort of a mystery to most San Franciscans.

“You know it’s almost like this masonic ritual,” Rodenbeck says.  "If you've got the key, this whole other city layer unlocks itself to you. And that’s the kind of urban puzzle we like to solve."

So, Stamen decided to map the private shuttle buses connecting San Francisco to Silicon Valley.

(image courtesy of Stamen Design)

But getting the data wasn’t easy. The tech companies don’t comment on the buses. They don’t tell you where they stop or how many people ride on them. But in the era of big data, the information was easy enough to find.

“Even though the companies might not have wanted their locations public, we started looking around and we realized on Foursquare -- if you typed in “shuttle” and “google” or “shuttle” and “apple” all these locations came up because their employees were checking in at those bus stops,” Rodenbeck says.

Stamen also hired bike messengers to follow the buses. And then they had people just sit at a cafe on the corner of 18th and Dolores and count the people getting on and off the buses.

I checked out the Google bus stop a little after 7 a.m. one rainy morning and the “G-bus,” as the display on its windshield reads, was already picking up Googlers. For the next few hours, the buses would arrive in 15-20 minute intervals and a steady stream of 20-30 somethings, holding coffee cups and wearing sneakers and backpacks, would get on board.

It might have been the early morning hour or the rain but few people were willing to talk. When I approached a group of 20-somethings and asked them about the bus, they said they couldn’t talk because Google was in "a quiet period." A quiet period is when a company can’t say anything that might affect its stock price, and that was the nicest response I got until I met 35-year-old Tanya Birch, who works on the Google Earth outreach team. I asked her what it’s like on the bus.

“It’s pretty sweet,” Birch said. “They let us choose the type of seats and decor inside. And it’s got dim lighting with the Google colors.”

There’s also free Wi-Fi on the shuttles, and Birch said it's basically another hour of work.

The tech world is driven by young, educated largely urban workers. But companies like Facebook, Google and Apple are located in the suburbs of Silicon Valley, which is about an hour south of the San Francisco.

“I think a lot of young people who work at the tech companies they want the city life they want something that’s fun and entertaining, and you don’t get that in the suburbs,” Birch said.

So,  to compete for that talent pool, big tech companies have to provide transportation. Rodenbeck says he expected to find the shuttles in the city’s hip, young neighborhoods.

“What we were surprised to learn is that the network is much more extensive than that,” says Rodenbeck.

When the map was finished, Stamen counted buses from Apple, eBay, Electronic Arts, Facebook, Google and Yahoo, and they found the buses ran through almost every neighborhood in San Francisco. Stamen estimates that about 14,000 people ride the private shuttle buses every day.

Rodenbeck says he thinks the locations are secret because the companies are “sensitive to this idea that they are funding a change in the infrastructure in San Francisco without it being regulated.”

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency is in the midst of studying what’s essentially emerging as a private mass-transportation system, says Jerry Robbins, a transportation planner for the agency.

“The increase in employer buses has sparked some reaction from residents,” Robbins says.

He says that since tech companies contract out the work to private bus companies, which are regulated by the state, the city has little say in what they do.

But Robbins says the agency has fielded complaints that the the private shuttle buses, which often stop at public bus stops, are causing delays and traffic.

Another impact is rising real estate prices, says Amanda Jones, a realtor in San Francisco for nearly a decade. Today, about half her clients work in the tech industry.

“Unquestionably the shuttle stops are transforming real estate values,” Jones says. “When I interview new clients, we get out the real estate map and they want to show me where their corporate shuttles are. I recently sold a house. He does trading for Google and gets in early in the morning. Literally, if it wasn’t five blocks from a shuttle stop, we didn’t look at it.”

Jones says even fixers-uppers and homes with shaky foundations are selling for a premium if they’re located near a private shuttle bus stop.

“They have so little time to have with family and their friends they want to go home and be able to walk to the restaurant and not be stuck in their car for two hours,” says Jones.

Jones says she gets it because until someone comes up with an app that can beam you to work, the private shuttle bus is as close as you get.

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Slate Political Gabfest

Slate: The Live From Seattle Gabfest

Friday, October 05, 2012

A special live show of Slate's Political Gabfest, featuring David Plotz, John Dickerson, Emily Bazelon and guest Dan Savage. This week: The debate, the election aftermath and the maternity leave that wasn't.

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WNYC News

ICYMI: Off-Beat Business

Wednesday, August 08, 2012

You’ve see the headlines, read the front pages and checked out the business section. But In Case You Missed It, here are a few, under-the-radar business stories you might have overlooked.

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Listen to Lucy

Jobs, motherhood and varieties of wrong

Wednesday, August 01, 2012

Jobs, motherhood and varieties of wrong

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Money Talking

Money Talking: Do Star CEOs Turn Around Troubled Companies?

Friday, July 20, 2012

Former tech darling, Yahoo, has been struggling in a world dominated by Apple, Amazon, Google and Facebook. Even with an estimated 700 million users around the world, it’s had difficulty turning that reach into profits.  This week, the company reported that revenues were down 1 percent for the quarter that finished June 30, and profits fell to $226 million from $237 million a year earlier.

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The Takeaway

Motherhood and Work: Is the Recent Criticism of Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer Fair?

Friday, July 20, 2012

 Is it possible to balance impending motherhood with the responsibility of running a large company like Yahoo? Marissa Mayer has  been criticized recently for trying.

Comments [21]

The Takeaway

The Glass Cliff: Marissa Mayer is Yahoo's New CEO

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

"The glass cliff" — it's a concept coined by two female University of Exeter professors that has since been used to analyze gender roles in senior leadership for companies that are struggling to keep above ground.

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Matters of Economy

Yahoo's CEO Blunder

Friday, June 01, 2012

At one time, Yahoo! owned the world's most-visited Internet site. But the company is in turmoil, in part because of increased competition. Find out what the future may hold.

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