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Wwii

Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Robert Sherwood Humanizes Wartime Efforts and Urges 'Enduring Peace'

Friday, December 21, 2012

WNYC

Calling himself a "Broadway wise-cracker and a Hollywood hack," Robert Sherwood, author, soldier, pacifist, and speechwriter, gives a stirring account of his wartime work for the Roosevelt administration at this 1948 Books and Authors Luncheon.

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Radiolab

Mr. Bliss

Monday, December 17, 2012

First: a perfect moment. On day 86 of a 3-month trek to and from the South Pole, adventurer Aleksander Gamme discovered something he'd stashed under the ice at the start of his trip. He wasn't expecting such a rush of happiness in that cold, hungry ...

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The Leonard Lopate Show

The Noir Forties

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Historian Richard Lingeman examines the years between VJ Day and the beginning of the Korean War, describing how we went from hot war to Cold War, and from there to here. The Noir Forties is a reexamination of America’s postwar period, and it traces the attitudes, sentiments, hopes and fears, prejudices, behavior, and collective dreams and nightmares of the times.

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Fishko Files

Post-War Painters

Thursday, November 22, 2012

From fistfights in bars…to inspiration in cold water flats…the post WWII art scene in New York is legendary.  In this edition of Fishko Files, WNYC’s Sara Fishko hears tales from postwar painters who were in downtown Manhattan just as Abstract Expressionism was taking hold. (Produced in 2010)

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Susanna Moore's The Life of Objects

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Susanna Moore talks about her new novel, The Life of Objects. It’s about a 17-year-old Irish woman who joins the Berlin household of Felix and Dorothea Metzenburg. Art collectors, and friends to the most fascinating men and women in Europe, the Metzenburgs introduce Beatrice to a world in which she finds more to desire than she ever imagined. But the threat of Nazi terror, the deportation and murder of Jews, and the hordes of refugees fleeing the advancing Red Army cast a dark shadow.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

W. Somerset Maugham Contemplates the Future of American Writers

Friday, November 16, 2012

WNYC

In this 1950 speech given at a Books and Authors Luncheon, W. Somerset Maugham lays out his surprisingly detailed plan for a foreign academy to promote the growth of American literature.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Inspiration Strikes After Tragedy: Alfred Kazin on His New Yorker Trilogy

Friday, November 02, 2012

WNYC

Starting Out in the Thirties (1965), the second installment of Kazin's New Yorker Trilogy, had just been published when he gave this brief talk on the genesis of his artistic motivation at a 1965 Books and Authors Luncheon.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Thomas Ricks on Military Leadership

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Thomas Ricks discusses the decline of American military leadership from World War II to Iraq. History has been kind to the American generals of World War II—Marshall, Eisenhower, Patton, and Bradley—and less kind to the generals of the wars that followed. He looks at why in his new book The Generals: American Military Command from World War II to Today.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

The Political Playwright Rolf Hochhuth Assails the Catholic Church for 'Immoral Inaction'

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

WNYC

Chaos rules at this rowdy 1964 meeting of the Overseas Press Club. The guest panel includes Catholic Church critic, Rolf Hochhuth, and a Catholic Church official. 

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The Leonard Lopate Show

German Soldiers in WWII

Friday, October 12, 2012

Sönke Neitzel, Professor of International History, London School of Economics, discusses his investigations into the mind-set of the German fighting man during World War II. Soldaten: On Fighting, Killing, and Dying, written with social psychologist Harald Welzer, is based on declassified transcripts of covert recordings taken within the confines of the holding cells, bedrooms, and camps that housed the German POWs, providing a view of the mentality of the soldiers in the Wehrmacht, the Luftwaffe, the German navy.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

John Gunther, Author of 'Inside' Travel Guides, Offers Glimpse of African Continent, 1955

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

WNYC

Formerly a foreign war correspondent, Chicagoan John Gunther drew on his background to write the 'Inside' travel series, which included Inside Europe (1936), Inside Asia (1939), Inside Latin America (1941), and here, Inside Africa.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Günter Grass on American Vagaries: Boxing, Dancing, and Creating Art

Friday, October 05, 2012

WNYC

In May 1965, the Overseas Press Club hosted the German novelist Günter Grass, who had arrived in New York to teach a seminar at Columbia University. 

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

The "Overpoweringly Witty" Fiction of Noël Coward

Wednesday, August 29, 2012

WNYC

Celebrating the appearance of his first published novel, Pomp and Circumstance (1961), Noël Coward coolly rebuts those critics calling him "antiquated, snobbish, and belonging to an earlier, more complacent age." 

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Radiolab

Double Blasted

Monday, July 16, 2012

In early August of 1945, Tsutomu Yamaguchi had a run of the worst luck imaginable. A double blast of radiation left his future, and the future of his descendants, in doubt. In this short: an utterly amazing survival story that spans ... well, 4 billion years when you get down to it.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

American Business During World War II

Monday, June 04, 2012

Arthur Herman tells how American businessmen—automobile magnate William Knudsen and shipbuilder Henry J. Kaiser—helped mobilize the “arsenal of democracy” that propelled the Allies to victory in World War II. Freedom’s Forge: How American Business Produced Victory in World War II tells how Knudsen and Kaiser helped transformed America into an economic and military superpower.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Madeleine Albright's Personal Story of Remembrance and War

Tuesday, May 15, 2012

Former U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright discusses the Nazi invasion of Czechoslovakia—the country where she was born—and the events of World War II that shook her life before she turned twelve. Her memoir Prague Winter: A Personal Story of Remembrance and War: 1937–1948 draws on the memories of her and her family, her parents' written reflections, interviews, and newly available documents to give an account of the most tumultuous 12 years in modern history.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Hitlerland

Thursday, May 03, 2012

Andrew Nagorski discusses Hitler’s rise to power and Nazi Germany as seen through the eyes of Americans—diplomats, military, expats, visiting authors, Olympic athletes—who lived and worked there and watched it happen. Hitlerland: American Eyewitnesses to the Nazi Rise to Power offers surprising twists and a fresh perspective on this era.

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The Takeaway

Japanese American WWII Veterans Look Back on Pearl Harbor

Wednesday, December 07, 2011

Seventy years ago today, Japan attacked a naval base at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, killing and wounding thousands of Americans. The enemy might have been Japan, but in the American melting pot there were many Japanese faces. The Pearl Harbor inspired solidarity in America soon gave way to distrust and a staggering suspension of the U.S. Constitution. "War Relocation Camps" for 100,000 Japanese-Americans were set up, and entire families of American citizens were forced to halt their lives and move. Some of those relocated Japanese-Americans petitioned the U.S. to serve in combat as a way of demonstrating their loyalty. The petitions were accepted, and soon Japanese-Americans were fighting as both volunteers and drafted servicemen.

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

Overseas Press Club: Dickey Chapelle, 1964

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

Pioneering woman photojournalist is heard over WNYC!

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Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

"The Bid was Four Hearts," the story of the Four Chaplains

Monday, May 30, 2011

The story of the Four Chaplains seems largely unknown now, but throughout the 1940’s and 50’s their story served as a symbol of bravery and sacrifice to many. In 1948, February 3rd was declared Four Chaplains Day by a unanimous vote of Congress, and the chaplains were mentioned in President Eisenhower’s famous 1953 “Back to God” speech. The docudrama presented here originally aired on Memorial Day 1950.

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