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Wwii

The Leonard Lopate Show

Hollywood and World War II

Monday, March 03, 2014

Legendary directors John Ford, William Wyler, John Huston, Frank Capra, and George Stevens played major roles in World War II. We'll find out how their time in the armed services changed Hollywood, and how Hollywood, in turn, influenced the war.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Life After Exoneration; "The Americans"' What's Wrong with Fraternities; Hollywood and WWII

Monday, March 03, 2014

We’ll take a look at assistance for exonerated inmates as they make the transition back to life outside. Noah Emmerich talks about starring in the FX series, "The Americans," which just began its second season. Atlantic contributing editor Caitlin Flanagan discusses the power that college fraternities around the country have. Mark Harris describes how World War II was shaped by Hollywood and how the war changed the film industry in general, and five directors in particular.

The Leonard Lopate Show

A Japanese War Crimes Suspect and an Unsolved Mystery from World War II

Thursday, February 13, 2014

In the wake of World War II, the Allied forces charged 28 Japanese men with crimes against humanity. Eric Jaffe tells the story of one of the accused, a civilian named Okawa Shumei. On the first day of the Tokyo trial, he made headlines around the world by slapping star defendant and wartime prime minister Tojo Hideki on the head. Had Okawa lost his sanity? Or was he faking madness to avoid a grim punishment? Jaffee tells the story in his book A Curious Madness

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Mussolini, the Pope, and the Rise of Fascism

Monday, February 10, 2014

David I. Kertzer talks about the complex and secret relationship that Pope Pius XI’s had with Italian dictator Benito Mussolini. The two men both came to power in 1922, and together changed the course of the 20th-century. Kertzer’s book The Pope and Mussolini: The Secret History of Pius XI and the Rise of Fascism in Europe, shows how Pius XI played a crucial role in making Mussolini’s dictatorship possible and keeping him in power. But as Mussolini moved closer to Hitler, the pope started to lash out.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Japan 1941

Wednesday, December 04, 2013

Eri Hotta considers the attack on Pearl Harbor from the Japanese perspective and argues that when Japan launched hostilities against the United States in 1941, its leaders largely understood they were entering a war they were almost certain to lose. Her book Japan 1941: Countdown to Infamy poses an essential question: Why did these men—military men, civilian politicians, diplomats, the emperor—put their country and its citizens so unnecessarily in harm’s way? She draws on material little known to Western readers to find an answer.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Japan in 1941; Rhino Records; Paul Auster's Early Life; Disappearring Monarch Butterflies; Bruce Dern

Wednesday, December 04, 2013

Eri Hotta takes a look at the attack on Pearl Harbor from the Japanese point of view and examines Japan’s leaders entered a war they thought they were likely to lose. Harold Bronson tells the story of his Rhino Records, which was born in the backroom of a record store in the 1970s. Paul Auster discusses his early intellectual life— from his love of cartoons to writing his first poem at the age of 9. We’ll find out why scientists are worried about the monarch butterfly population. And Bruce Dern talks about playing Woody in Alexander Payne’s latest film, “Nebraska.”

The Leonard Lopate Show

Art Stolen by the Nazis Discovered in Munich

Thursday, November 07, 2013

More than one thousand works of art stolen by the Nazi’s were discovered in a Munich apartment this week. Valued at nearly $1.35 billion, the trove includes works by Matisse, Picasso, Dix and Chagall believed to have been seized from museums and Jewish collectors. It has also been revealed that the US military may have inspected part of collection after World War II and then returned it to Nazi art dealer Hildebrand Gurlitt. Dr. Christoph Zuschlag, a professor of art history at the University of Koblenz in Landau, Germany, and David Lewis, co-chair of the Commission for Looted Art in Europe, talk about the discovery.

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The Leonard Lopate Show

Terry Lenzner on his Legal Career; Women and the Holocaust; Ethan Coen's First Full-Length Play; The Gurus of How-To

Wednesday, October 09, 2013

Investigative lawyer Terry Lenzner looks back at his varied career, including investigating the 1964 deaths of 3 civil rights workers and his work for the Senate Watergate Committee. Wendy Lower discusses the role German women played in the Holocaust. Susan Pourfar and Halley Feiffer talk about their roles in Ethan Coen’s new off-Broadway play, “Women or Nothing.” And our gurus of how-to, Al and Larry Ubell on how to prepare your home for the cooler weather.

The Leonard Lopate Show

German Women in the Nazi Killing Fields

Wednesday, October 09, 2013

Wendy Lower gives a stunning account of the role of German women on the World War II Nazi eastern front, arguing that we have ignored the reality of women’s participation in the Holocaust. Hitler’s Furies: German Women in the Nazi Killing Fields makes the case for the massive complicity, and participation, of the 500,000 young German women in the killing fields of the Third Reich.

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Soundcheck

Guitar Special: Kalamazoo Gals, Richard Thompson Plays ‘Electric’

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Soundcheck is revisiting some of our favorite segments from the past year. Today, we're presenting a "Guitar Special," featuring a Rosie the Riveter guitar mystery and an iconic folk guitar master still going strong.

In this episode: John Thomas shares the story of unsung heroines, as detailed in his book, Kalamazoo Gals: A Story Of Extraordinary Women And Gibson’s ‘Banner’ Guitars of WWII.

Plus: Veteran English folk singer and guitarist Richard Thompson performs songs from his latest album, Electric, and reveals a passion for birding and NHL hockey.

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    The Leonard Lopate Show

    The War in Western Europe 1944-1945

    Thursday, May 30, 2013

    Rick Atkinson discusses the final book of his acclaimed Liberation Trilogy about the Allied triumph in Europe during World War II. The Guns at Last Light: The War in Western Europe 1944-1945, tells the story of the titanic battle for Western Europe:  D-Day, the brutal fight in Normandy, the liberation of Paris, the disaster that was Operation Market Garden, the horrific Battle of the Bulge, and finally into the heart of the Third Reich.

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    The Leonard Lopate Show

    Helping Women in Africa; The Dramatic End of WWII; A Billion Dollar Online Poker Empire; Amazon and Taxes

    Thursday, May 30, 2013

    We’ll talk with Molly Melching, who went to Senegal as an exchange student and has stayed for almost 40 years, trying to improve the lives of women and girls there. Rick Atkinson talks about the conclusion of his monumental Liberation Trilogy, The Guns at Last Light, which chronicles the fight in Europe from D-Day to VE Day. Plus, the story of six college friends who turned their weekly poker game into a billion-dollar online gaming empire. And we’ll take a look at Amazon’s fight not to charge its customers state sales tax.

    The Leonard Lopate Show

    Rescuing Italian Art from Nazis

    Wednesday, May 08, 2013

    Robert Edsel talks about the men and women who rescued great Italian art from destruction during WWII. In May 1944 two unlikely American heroes—artist Deane Keller and scholar Fred Hartt—set out from Naples to track billions of dollars of missing art, including works by Michelangelo, Donatello, Titian, Caravaggio, and Botticelli. Edsel tells the story in Saving Italy: The Race to Rescue a Nation’s Treasures from the Nazis.

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    The Leonard Lopate Show

    Roosevelt, Lindbergh and America's Fight Over World War II

    Wednesday, April 03, 2013

    Lynne Olson discusses the debate over American intervention in World War II—a bitter, sometimes violent clash of personalities and ideas that divided the nation. Her book Those Angry Days focuses on the years 1939 to 1941 and on he two most famous men in America: President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Charles Lindbergh.

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    The Leonard Lopate Show

    Looking Back at Iraq, Soprano Diana Damrau, Piecing Together WWII Stories, Celebrating MAD Magazine

    Tuesday, March 19, 2013

    We’re launching a three-day series to mark the tenth anniversary of the invasion of Iraq. Today we’ll start by looking at how the Bush Administration made the case to invade. German soprano Diana Damrau talks about singing opposite Placido Domingo in “La Traviata” at the Metropolitan Opera. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Dale Maharidge describes trying to find the surviving members of his father’s WWII Marine Company. And illustrators Drew Friedman, Al Jaffe, and Arnold Roth on the life and work of MAD Magazine founding editor Harvey Kurtzman.

    The Leonard Lopate Show

    Dale Maharidge on Bringing Mulligan Home

    Tuesday, March 19, 2013

    Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Dale Maharidge discusses his quest to find surviving members of his father’s WWII Marine Company and uncover their experience fighting in the Pacific. In Bringing Mulligan Home: The Other Side of the Good War, Maharidge tells the stories of men in their 70s and 80s who’d never spoken so openly and emotionally about the war that followed them home. The survivors show that the scars and demons of war remain for decades.

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    The Brian Lehrer Show

    Madeleine Albright on Writing and World Politics

    Thursday, February 21, 2013

    Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright talks to Brian Lehrer about diplomatic transitions and her memoir, now in paperback, Prague Winter: A Personal Story of Remembrance and War, 1937-1948.

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    Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

    Friendship Train Attempts to Humanize Postwar Effort

    Friday, February 08, 2013

    WNYC

    These two 1947 broadcasts mark the start and finish of the Friendship Food Train's U.S. journey, a project conceived to help the people of Europe get through the winter. 

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    Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

    Herman Wouk Bucks Literary Trends to Produce Best-Selling Novels

    Friday, January 25, 2013

    WNYC

    Herman Wouk, appearing in this 1955  Books and Authors Luncheon, contests what he perceives as the common view of his being "a conformist." 

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    Annotations: The NEH Preservation Project

    William L. Shirer on Nazi Germany After 'The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich'

    Monday, December 24, 2012

    WNYC

    Though it is already two decades after the start of World War II, the shadow of Nazi Germany still looms large over this 1960 talk given by journalist and historian William L. Shirer at a Books and Authors Luncheon. 

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